Kindle Price: $1.99
Read this title for free. Learn more

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

OR
Read for Free
with Kindle Unlimited

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Get the Free Kindle App

Enter email or phone number to get a link

Processing your request...

Plundering the Till Kindle Edition

9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$1.99

Length: 236 pages

The One I Was
The One I Was by Eliza Graham
A beautiful and haunting tale of friendship, redemption and forgiveness across generations. Learn more

Product Details


More About the Author

Ken Brimhall is a retired teacher living in San Antonio, Texas, USA. After graduating from the University of Northern Iowa, he bummed around a few years (Yes, there were no jobs then, too!) and in 1976 joined the Peace Corp in Guatemala, where he didn't accomplish much but married well, and now he has two lovely daughters (even if he does say so himself). He writes because he thinks he has something to say, but will leave it to the reader to decide. When not writing, you may find him uttering an irrelevant comment at some book club meeting, or chugging coffee and closing down Internet cafes in Central America. He wishes all his readers good health.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kathy Cunningham TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Ken Brimhall's PLUNDERING THE TILL is a mesmerizing tale of human perseverance in the face of political corruption. Phil Strias is a teacher in San Miguel, a border town in South Texas. He's married to Aide, who he met while he was in the Peace Corp in Guatemala. Their friend Ty Betancourt runs the local newspaper in San Miguel, and he's determined to bring to light the political corruption that runs rampant in the local government. But fighting corruption is dangerous, as Aide learned when her brother-in-law Xavier, an activist in Guatemala, was murdered for his anti-government protests. Will Ty's own activism in San Miguel bring him a similar fate? And will Phil and Aide get caught in the crossfire?

The best part of PLUNDERING THE TILL is the almost lyrical quality of Brimhall's prose. He uses detailed elements of his settings (both San Miguel and Guatemala) to plunge his readers into this unique and complex environment. He writes about wasps and fire ants and leaf-cutter ants in ways that make them reflective of the plight of our characters. A frenzied hunt for a pesky opossum seems more like a struggle for human survival. Brimhall writes about food and clothing and music and the local bars and cantinas, making his readers feel a part of them. I was captivated from the start

At its core, PLUNDERING THE TILL is about the conflict between reform and revolution. Phil, more stable and conservative, argues for reform. He pushes Ty to keep quiet about the corruption he has uncovered, and work instead to get the `politicos' to see the evils of their ways. "You've got to reform them," Phil argues, "because it's not just one or two politicians, it's the whole damn system." Ty, however, is the revolutionary. He has no patience for Phil's views on reformation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Joe TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
PLUNDERING THE TILL is described as a "hard-hitting account of love, lust and corruption." That it may be, but certainly not during the first 22 percent of it, i.e. the first seven chapters.

I know I'm at odds with the reviewers of this book who have gone before me and awarded four or five stars, but, of course, they presumably read the whole thing. They're made of stronger mettle than I.

By the time I'd reached that critical 22 percent, no one of a multitude of major and minor characters had engaged my interest even so much as a smidgen. And waiting for the plot to gain momentum was perhaps like watching the heat radiate off the pavement down in South Texas near where the border with Mexico meets the Gulf - the area where the story begins.

If you're hawking a one-of-a-kind item - I don't know, like self-washing windows or a breed of dog genetically programmed to scoop his own waste into a plastic baggie - then it'll market itself. But if you're selling books, tires, mattresses or breakfast cereal, then you've got to grab the attention of the punters from the get-go. And PLUNDERING THE TILL just didn't do that for me.

Not wishing to be unreasonably unfair since I didn't finish the remaining 78 percent, I'll award this novel three non-committal stars and let others do the heavy lifting. In the meantime, I'm just going to delete it from my e-reader and move on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lucy M. on October 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
PLUNDERING THE TILL is so realistic, it doesn't feel like fiction. It feels as if these are real people, living real lives, and the reader is watching them, listening to them talk, and sharing their emotions. The story moves between different time frames and different characters, bringing each into sharp definition. Many of the chapters are so complete and compelling, it seems they could stand alone as short stories. As much as the book has to do with what happened in Guatemala to the families and people we learn to care about, there is also a deceptively leisurely avant garde and literary feel to the writing. Ken Brimhall's writing is wonderfully descriptive and nuanced. This book is highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
*I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

I'm sorry Mr. Brimhall. I tried to like it, I really did.

Mr. Brimhall seems like a lovely person, so it pains me to say I couldn't finish this book. It was as interesting as watching hair grow. I forced myself to read it until I just couldn't stand it anymore. I would put it aside, read another book, then return to it hoping it would change. I made it to 39%, and it took months to get that far.

I agree wholeheartedly with Joseph Haschka's review. There's just no story here. There's no character development, no humor, no suspense, nothing at all to engage the readers' minds. I don't understand the "hard-hitting" description and the glowing reviews. The descriptions are so overdone, I found myself shaking my head repeatedly.

The house the protagonist is building, for instance; we know the exact mileage from his apartment to the house, the mileage from city limits, distance to his job, condition of nearby subdivisions and streets, name of the contractors (and their resumes), what materials have been used and why and where, the color and consistency of the soil in the yard, the location of plumbing and electrical cords underground, what types of wildflowers grow there in each season, and more. If reading that summary bored you, imagine reading 39% of a novel like that!

Even the dialogue is mind-numbing. With the excruciating amount of detail, somehow half the dialogue manages to avoid making any sense. It's actually impressive in a way to have so much detail yet still make no sense. There doesn't seem to be a plot. I read almost half, so a plot should be evident by now.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in