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112 of 116 people found the following review helpful
on August 29, 2013
I bought this edition, even though I had the green (4E) version. I use this book every day since the first day of my third year rotations for Internal Medicine topics (now I am a resident). Pocket Medicine gives you everything you need, regarding the latest information about Internal medicine. Now for those who've never heard of it, or are considering buying this book, why is it so good? It is concise and it gives you the key points. If you really wanted to get more information then you probably need to go to uptodate or the next step up, the holy bible of IM itself, Harrison's. Pocket Medicine is designed to give you everything you need, in your pocket (as if our white coats aren't heavy enough). And the best part about this book versus other pocket manuals is that it cites real articles. NEJM, JAMA, Lancet, real sources of evidence based medicine. Evidence based should be the goal of every medical student, resident, and physician's basis of how they practice. Now the book takes some use to with the abbreviations, acronyms, and how it's formatted out, but once you get used to it, you will be looking up things very fast and before you know it, you will be citing pages in Pocket Medicine. For medical students, anything that your attending is pimping you on, its probably in this book (and its probably more updated than what your attending is looking for). For residents, don't waste any more time trying to figure out admit orders off uptodate, just get it done with this book.

Now for those who had the green medicine book, you're wondering, is it really worth the 60 dollars? Medicine doesn't change very much and many treatment protocols are still the same (except for maybe chemotherapy regimens). However, after scanning through about 10 topics, there's at least a one line update (usually more in the range of 3-5). Will it change how you will practice? Unlikely, especially if you were following the green book. But yes, there's abundance of changes everywhere. For example, they updated cystitis even though it's a bread and butter IM issue - I'll leave it to you to buy the book to find out the update ;) although I warn you, its not drastically different. But there are some definite useful updates such as how aggressive you want to be on diabetic management according to the latest guidelines. How aggressive should you be on HgA1c or the BP? You could spend tons of time looking it up, or just flip to the page in 5 seconds. The new consult sections aren't real deal breakers in my opinion (Surgical, Ob/Gyn, Optho) because you're probably going to consult those specialists anyways, but its nice to have. At least you'll sound a little smarter when you talk to them for the consultation? The new sections like anaphylaxis and nutritional issues aren't major additions to warrant to buy this book over the green/4e book.

Would I still recommend buying this book? Yes. But if you're a poor resident who already had the green book and don't want to spend money that should be going to payback your loans, I would stick to the green book.

My only real negative about this edition is that they used the new "recycle"-like paper (the thin type) over what they were using for the green 4e book. It feels cheaper and easier to rip. Otherwise, I recommend it as the gold standard of pocket manuals :D

Note: This was not a paid recommendation of the book. I just enjoy Pocket Medicine a lot.
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80 of 84 people found the following review helpful
on March 13, 2014
This book is obviously a must-have book for your internal medicine inpatient work whether it's as a medical student, intern, or resident. It is extremely concise, has wide breadth, and is full of citations and evidence. The thing is, it can be a bit too concise. With all the acronyms, you feel like you're reading a different language sometimes. Also, sometimes the guidance is not that flushed out. As you get more and more accustomed throughout residency, it becomes better and better. As such, I'd recommend complementing it with a couple other must-haves:

1) UCSF Hospitalist Handbook - the info is a bit more practical and step-by-step than Pocket Medicine. It's a great complement or alternative (you can get the iPhone/Android version for cheaper through AgileMD). Because it gives way more tangible, practical diagnostic and management steps than the Red/Green book, all my residents would be super surprised at how much more "mature" and "relevant" my diagnostic and management plans were in my presentations. They thought I was a genius and further along than most of my classmates...(and I wasn't too keen on letting them know where most of that genius was coming from :)

2) Sanford Guide (microbio) - this is really the best book for any microbio you'll need on the wards. You'll look like you actually paid attention during microbio with this book. The typie is very small ad the paper quality sucks. can be a bit slow to navigate through. You can look stuff up by organism or condition, and it has a spectrum of bacteria sensitive to each antibiotic.

3) Tarascons (pharm) - It is far and away the fastest way to get your hands on dosage, forms available, and pricing data. I can't tell you how much of a superstar you'll look like if you actually are talking about dosing as a medical student. This is not something any med students are familiar with. That alone makes this book worth it. Color tabs have made it easier to navigate through. Some of the older drugs are gone. The tables are awesome.

4) Download medscape for general reference questions here n' there. Personally, I like it more than epocrates...and it's free.

5) +/- Maxwells...quickly becomes unnecessary but nice to have in the beginning when you're just learning the ropes and need refreshers on some of the stuff you learned back in 2nd year.

6) Netflix- for call-nights and unwinding when you actually get a day off! True Detective is a phenomenal series.
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45 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2013
As a medical student to lighten the load of pocket books, I decided on the Kindle version. I found it extremely difficult to navigate in our fast paced environment & difficult to notate. If I had it to do I would go with the paper version.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
THIS is a classic and must-have for med students and residents.

I had the 4th edition which, sadly, was stolen. Now, who would take a beat-up, VRE & MRSA ridden old book?!? Well, that all depends on the book. And apparently, THIS one was worth grabbing for keepers.

Full of quick signs, symptoms and management WITH references to landmark journal articles to impress your attendings! Heck, I've even seen attendings with this baby. (Yeah, they don't admit it.)

Definitely worth getting a replacement pristine copy, even at $60. Fits in your pocket, more valuable than a stethoscope (maybe). Don't bother with the e-version, having this on your person, being flip-able is half the value (not to mention there is a HUGE perception difference between looking up things on your phone-slash-tablet and this very recognizable resource. Take my word for it, with the former everyone will assume you're just texting or something.). Whipping this out to looks stuff up is always welcome in the hospital, under most any circumstances. Plus, the mini-binder format (rather than a spiral or bound type format) allows you to add your own pages!

5 stars! I recommend getting even if you're not going into internal medicine, as this really covers the stuff we should know.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on October 7, 2013
This kindle version is not very navigable. Printed version is far superior in both material and in that it is way easier to read
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 30, 2013
I think this is a great resource. It is amazing how much information they can fit into such a compact book. Of course it is important to have access to other more detailed reference materials at times, but this is the best pocket handbook I have found.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 22, 2014
This will save you on the wards, mostly on the medicine clerkship. Residents will pimp you, firing questions at your defenseless body, sometimes relentlessly. That is their sword.

This is your shield.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2014
Best Pocket text you can find!!
Tried many others but none compares to this one. I have both paper and kindle one but I think paper one is better some how.
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14 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on October 13, 2013
I am currently reading this e-book and wasn't going to take time out to write up a review until I felt compelled to by the many formatting errors sprinkled throughout its pages. In a book as concise and dense as this, such errors can make reading a chore. Specifically the use of bullet-less and period-less lists, while easier on the eye on paper, is now a nightmare of machine-processed run-on sentences. As evidence take a look at, say, the section on "potassium homeostasis".

While I understand many technical e-books suffer similarly, this is no excuse for not proofreading. e-publishers really need to push out updates to correct these errors. This nice book deserves better treatment.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 31, 2013
This is the fourth iteration of this reference book that I've ordered now. I don't know what I'd do without it. As my experience level increases, I use it less but it's invaluable when needed.
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