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At a Glance

Birthname: Annie Decatur Danielewski
Nationality: American
Born: Mar 23 1968


Biography

The Beginning
Born in New York City, Poe spent her childhood on the move. Her father Tad Z. Danielewski (a Polish born documentary/ feature filmmaker) traveled constantly, working on projects in Africa, India, Western Europe and points across the US; his wife Priscilla (a Philadelphia born actress) and the couple’s two children were always in tow. This constant exposure to changing environments gave Poe and her brother (critically acclaimed novelist Mark Z. Danielewski) an early love of music as the universal language.

“I learned at a very young age that every one speaks a different ... Read more

The Beginning
Born in New York City, Poe spent her childhood on the move. Her father Tad Z. Danielewski (a Polish born documentary/ feature filmmaker) traveled constantly, working on projects in Africa, India, Western Europe and points across the US; his wife Priscilla (a Philadelphia born actress) and the couple’s two children were always in tow. This constant exposure to changing environments gave Poe and her brother (critically acclaimed novelist Mark Z. Danielewski) an early love of music as the universal language.

“I learned at a very young age that every one speaks a different language. Even if two people are both speaking English, their personal and cultural histories come into play—and not always amicably. Music, as a means of communication, can provide a way of transcending those differences.”

When at the age of 16, Poe’s parents divorced, she packed up and headed for New York City—where she lived in a squat with other alienated teens and sold fake subway tokens to pay for food. I t was there that she stumbled upon the wonders of multi-track recording. “I’d written songs on piano since age 8. Then I met this guy in Central Park who had a sampler and a 4 track in his apartment. I fell in love with the art of recording the day I got my hands on those machines. ”

At 18, Poe earned a full scholarship to Princeton, where she was able to continue honing her writing, production, and performance skills thanks to the wide-array of facilities available on campus.
“I had been living on my own since I was 16, and then all of a sudden I had access to al l these incredible resources. There were music studios, theatres to rehearse in, film and video facilities, and best of al l there were plenty of musicians who could come to a rehearsal without worrying whether or not they would make enough money to keep eating.”

Shortly after graduating from Princeton, Poe received devastating news that her father had been diagnosed with terminal cancer. She immediately left for LA and along with her brother (esteemed author Mark Z. Danielewski) stayed there to care for him until his death. “I really had no idea what to do next. All the musicians I had played with at school had moved on, and I had sold most of my recording equipment…I was at a loss. On a fluke I picked up the phone and cal led a guy named RJ Rice in Detroit. I had met RJ in a club in New York and we had subsequently exchanged CD’s of our music. I had really loved his stuff and the feeling was mutual. As luck had it , RJ still had a recording studio in his living room and he wasn’t up to much. So I packed my bags and stayed there with he and his wife writing and recording songs for a couple of months.”

Poe’s Debut Release
The results of that “fluke” led to the release of Poe’s 1996 Modern/Atlantic debut album, “Hello” which drew a dedicated fan base, in part, by the songs “Trigger happy Jack” and “Angry Johnny” -which went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts. The title track “Hello” became a club hit and went top 10 on the billboard dance charts. Based on the success of the album at radio, MTV began playing the videos, and that brought the whole thing to a new level. In 1997 “Hello” went gold and after ending an intense two and a half year stint on the road Poe began work on her 2nd album “Haunted”.

“I toured practically non-stop from 1995 to 1998 opening for various acts (Lenny Kravitz, Kiss, Sponge) and eventually I started headlining. The experience was exhilarating. Suddenly I had friends in almost every city in America, and thanks to the internet my fan base evolved quickly into an incredibly well connected community and a force unto itself.”

“Haunted”
Recorded entirely on Poe’s Mac 9600, the critically acclaimed “Haunted” was released in November 2001. The album tells a remarkable story about life, love, loss and the architecture of memory. Inspired by her discovery of a box of audio-cassettes containing “letters” that her father had recorded before his death, the creation of “Haunted” implemented technology in the most personal way imaginable. “I’ll never forget the moment I pressed play on a tape recorder and heard my father’s voice. A considerable amount of time had passed since his death, and yet here he was, speaking directly to my brother and I, sharing his thoughts about everything that was important to him. He said strange and wonderful things, things he had never told us when he was alive. Finding these tapes provided the necessary clues to uncovering a past I still hadn’t made sense of.”

Poe transferred the audio from these cassettes into her computer, utilizing her father’s voice as audience, critic, and beloved friend throughout the album. The completion of “Haunted” firmly established Poe’s reputation as a pioneering artist with tremendous vision and the talent to execute that vision.

“By this point in time I had also spent a number of years working very closely with my brother Mark Z. Danielewski on his novel “House of Leaves”. I’d written a number of songs that were inspired by bits of his writing and conversely, pieces of Mark’s novel had sprung out of songs that I had written. It was slowly becoming clear that my album and his book were in fact 2 parts of the same project. We were telling the same story in two different mediums and before “Haunted” was completed each song on the album was footnoted to 3 different narratives in the book.”

Still “Haunted”
Upon its release in 2000, “Haunted” seemed off to a very promising start. The album received a good amount of critical acclaim, and the press also responded enthusiastically to the connection between “Haunted” and my brother’s novel “House of Leaves”, which by that time had been published by Pantheon and was making sizable waves in the literary world. “Haunted’s” first single, “Hey Pretty” went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts--despite the fact that those formats had made a conscious decision to keep women out of their playlists. In addition, MTV put the video for “Hey Pretty” into rotation and Depeche Mode invited Poe to open for them on the US leg of their arena tour. “Haunted” was selling much better than “Hello” had in its first 6 months. In addition, Atlantic, excited by “Haunted’s” successful debut, renewed its option to continue their relationship with Poe and in doing so committed a good amount of funding to Poe’s future.

“I had every reason to feel very secure. If someone had told me at that point in time that I was about to be suddenly and inexplicably dropped from my label--I would not have believed them. But that’s what happened. Just as soon as the promotional cycle of “Haunted’s” release was gearing up, it was over.”

Through the odd twist of fate of artist and distribution deals, it turned out that the masters belonged to the owner of Modern Records -- meaning that in exchange for all of their investments, Atlantic, upon accepting delivery of my 3rd album, would be left with nothing. Atlantic ended their relationship with Modern Records---and sadly, with Poe as well. And that was then end of “Haunted”. With additional problems being faced with ownership of masters as well as future investments in Poe’s material, Poe was stuck in a crux for a number of years - the case finally settled in 2007. “My future now belongs to me and I’ve been writing tunes and re-building my life ever since.”

“Hello” Again
Spring forward to 2009 – Ford Motor Company’s decision to license the song “Hey Pretty” (now under the control of Sheridan Square Entertainment) in their 2009 Ford Flex commercials had great timing. “The fact this song has surfaced again on a national level, almost to the date of Obama taking office seems sublimely coincidental. It feels as though I have suddenly been given the opportunity to pick up where I left off--finishing what I started with “Haunted” in 2000 and carrying on from there with the support of a more artist friendly culture and climate.”

This breath of life in Poe’s work caused an influx of e-mails through Poe’s site--from long time fans excited by the songs and some from new fans who have never heard of Poe. “It’s like a déjà vu: here I am again promoting “Hey Pretty” and discussing “Haunted” as though the last 8 years never happened! Of course they did happen, and certainly a lot has changed; but the fact that more people may have a chance to hear that album, makes me happier than you can imagine. A lot of blood, sweat, and tears went into the making “Haunted” (on the part of myself and all the musicians involved in its production)…I never dreamed the album would have a second chance and thanks to Ford it does and I’m very grateful.

So What’s Next?:
Though Poe’s legal troubles kept her out of the public eye for a long time, they did not stop her from writing and creating music. “Music is almost a compulsion for me and I found solace writing and creating it the same way I always have. When the law suit ended I was at a crossroads in terms of what to do with all of the music I had on my drives and I had an over powering desire to start playing it with a band as opposed to simply finishing it in my computer. I listened to that instinct and in a stroke of luck ended up crossing paths with a few different musicians that are at the center of the music I’m making now.”

“I certainly don’t want to jinx it, but I will say that a sound is starting to emerge now that really excites me. Because it will still be a while before I’m ready to release a new album, I’ve decided to reach out to fans again and invite them to share in this process with us. I’ve started filming some of our recording sessions and will start posting them soon. I’m simply collecting unedited clips of the actual recording and writing process. The very moment at which a song comes into being can be pretty cool to witness and participate in--even as a spectator. If we do write something of value, or get that one magical take, or find that definitive melody or groove on a given night, I’d love for fans to be able to say that they were there with us when it happened.”

Only time will tell what strokes of genius Poe has yet to release on the world and in the meantime – “Haunted” has had a second chance with the world – one deserving of another listen if you haven’t already.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The Beginning
Born in New York City, Poe spent her childhood on the move. Her father Tad Z. Danielewski (a Polish born documentary/ feature filmmaker) traveled constantly, working on projects in Africa, India, Western Europe and points across the US; his wife Priscilla (a Philadelphia born actress) and the couple’s two children were always in tow. This constant exposure to changing environments gave Poe and her brother (critically acclaimed novelist Mark Z. Danielewski) an early love of music as the universal language.

“I learned at a very young age that every one speaks a different language. Even if two people are both speaking English, their personal and cultural histories come into play—and not always amicably. Music, as a means of communication, can provide a way of transcending those differences.”

When at the age of 16, Poe’s parents divorced, she packed up and headed for New York City—where she lived in a squat with other alienated teens and sold fake subway tokens to pay for food. I t was there that she stumbled upon the wonders of multi-track recording. “I’d written songs on piano since age 8. Then I met this guy in Central Park who had a sampler and a 4 track in his apartment. I fell in love with the art of recording the day I got my hands on those machines. ”

At 18, Poe earned a full scholarship to Princeton, where she was able to continue honing her writing, production, and performance skills thanks to the wide-array of facilities available on campus.
“I had been living on my own since I was 16, and then all of a sudden I had access to al l these incredible resources. There were music studios, theatres to rehearse in, film and video facilities, and best of al l there were plenty of musicians who could come to a rehearsal without worrying whether or not they would make enough money to keep eating.”

Shortly after graduating from Princeton, Poe received devastating news that her father had been diagnosed with terminal cancer. She immediately left for LA and along with her brother (esteemed author Mark Z. Danielewski) stayed there to care for him until his death. “I really had no idea what to do next. All the musicians I had played with at school had moved on, and I had sold most of my recording equipment…I was at a loss. On a fluke I picked up the phone and cal led a guy named RJ Rice in Detroit. I had met RJ in a club in New York and we had subsequently exchanged CD’s of our music. I had really loved his stuff and the feeling was mutual. As luck had it , RJ still had a recording studio in his living room and he wasn’t up to much. So I packed my bags and stayed there with he and his wife writing and recording songs for a couple of months.”

Poe’s Debut Release
The results of that “fluke” led to the release of Poe’s 1996 Modern/Atlantic debut album, “Hello” which drew a dedicated fan base, in part, by the songs “Trigger happy Jack” and “Angry Johnny” -which went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts. The title track “Hello” became a club hit and went top 10 on the billboard dance charts. Based on the success of the album at radio, MTV began playing the videos, and that brought the whole thing to a new level. In 1997 “Hello” went gold and after ending an intense two and a half year stint on the road Poe began work on her 2nd album “Haunted”.

“I toured practically non-stop from 1995 to 1998 opening for various acts (Lenny Kravitz, Kiss, Sponge) and eventually I started headlining. The experience was exhilarating. Suddenly I had friends in almost every city in America, and thanks to the internet my fan base evolved quickly into an incredibly well connected community and a force unto itself.”

“Haunted”
Recorded entirely on Poe’s Mac 9600, the critically acclaimed “Haunted” was released in November 2001. The album tells a remarkable story about life, love, loss and the architecture of memory. Inspired by her discovery of a box of audio-cassettes containing “letters” that her father had recorded before his death, the creation of “Haunted” implemented technology in the most personal way imaginable. “I’ll never forget the moment I pressed play on a tape recorder and heard my father’s voice. A considerable amount of time had passed since his death, and yet here he was, speaking directly to my brother and I, sharing his thoughts about everything that was important to him. He said strange and wonderful things, things he had never told us when he was alive. Finding these tapes provided the necessary clues to uncovering a past I still hadn’t made sense of.”

Poe transferred the audio from these cassettes into her computer, utilizing her father’s voice as audience, critic, and beloved friend throughout the album. The completion of “Haunted” firmly established Poe’s reputation as a pioneering artist with tremendous vision and the talent to execute that vision.

“By this point in time I had also spent a number of years working very closely with my brother Mark Z. Danielewski on his novel “House of Leaves”. I’d written a number of songs that were inspired by bits of his writing and conversely, pieces of Mark’s novel had sprung out of songs that I had written. It was slowly becoming clear that my album and his book were in fact 2 parts of the same project. We were telling the same story in two different mediums and before “Haunted” was completed each song on the album was footnoted to 3 different narratives in the book.”

Still “Haunted”
Upon its release in 2000, “Haunted” seemed off to a very promising start. The album received a good amount of critical acclaim, and the press also responded enthusiastically to the connection between “Haunted” and my brother’s novel “House of Leaves”, which by that time had been published by Pantheon and was making sizable waves in the literary world. “Haunted’s” first single, “Hey Pretty” went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts--despite the fact that those formats had made a conscious decision to keep women out of their playlists. In addition, MTV put the video for “Hey Pretty” into rotation and Depeche Mode invited Poe to open for them on the US leg of their arena tour. “Haunted” was selling much better than “Hello” had in its first 6 months. In addition, Atlantic, excited by “Haunted’s” successful debut, renewed its option to continue their relationship with Poe and in doing so committed a good amount of funding to Poe’s future.

“I had every reason to feel very secure. If someone had told me at that point in time that I was about to be suddenly and inexplicably dropped from my label--I would not have believed them. But that’s what happened. Just as soon as the promotional cycle of “Haunted’s” release was gearing up, it was over.”

Through the odd twist of fate of artist and distribution deals, it turned out that the masters belonged to the owner of Modern Records -- meaning that in exchange for all of their investments, Atlantic, upon accepting delivery of my 3rd album, would be left with nothing. Atlantic ended their relationship with Modern Records---and sadly, with Poe as well. And that was then end of “Haunted”. With additional problems being faced with ownership of masters as well as future investments in Poe’s material, Poe was stuck in a crux for a number of years - the case finally settled in 2007. “My future now belongs to me and I’ve been writing tunes and re-building my life ever since.”

“Hello” Again
Spring forward to 2009 – Ford Motor Company’s decision to license the song “Hey Pretty” (now under the control of Sheridan Square Entertainment) in their 2009 Ford Flex commercials had great timing. “The fact this song has surfaced again on a national level, almost to the date of Obama taking office seems sublimely coincidental. It feels as though I have suddenly been given the opportunity to pick up where I left off--finishing what I started with “Haunted” in 2000 and carrying on from there with the support of a more artist friendly culture and climate.”

This breath of life in Poe’s work caused an influx of e-mails through Poe’s site--from long time fans excited by the songs and some from new fans who have never heard of Poe. “It’s like a déjà vu: here I am again promoting “Hey Pretty” and discussing “Haunted” as though the last 8 years never happened! Of course they did happen, and certainly a lot has changed; but the fact that more people may have a chance to hear that album, makes me happier than you can imagine. A lot of blood, sweat, and tears went into the making “Haunted” (on the part of myself and all the musicians involved in its production)…I never dreamed the album would have a second chance and thanks to Ford it does and I’m very grateful.

So What’s Next?:
Though Poe’s legal troubles kept her out of the public eye for a long time, they did not stop her from writing and creating music. “Music is almost a compulsion for me and I found solace writing and creating it the same way I always have. When the law suit ended I was at a crossroads in terms of what to do with all of the music I had on my drives and I had an over powering desire to start playing it with a band as opposed to simply finishing it in my computer. I listened to that instinct and in a stroke of luck ended up crossing paths with a few different musicians that are at the center of the music I’m making now.”

“I certainly don’t want to jinx it, but I will say that a sound is starting to emerge now that really excites me. Because it will still be a while before I’m ready to release a new album, I’ve decided to reach out to fans again and invite them to share in this process with us. I’ve started filming some of our recording sessions and will start posting them soon. I’m simply collecting unedited clips of the actual recording and writing process. The very moment at which a song comes into being can be pretty cool to witness and participate in--even as a spectator. If we do write something of value, or get that one magical take, or find that definitive melody or groove on a given night, I’d love for fans to be able to say that they were there with us when it happened.”

Only time will tell what strokes of genius Poe has yet to release on the world and in the meantime – “Haunted” has had a second chance with the world – one deserving of another listen if you haven’t already.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The Beginning
Born in New York City, Poe spent her childhood on the move. Her father Tad Z. Danielewski (a Polish born documentary/ feature filmmaker) traveled constantly, working on projects in Africa, India, Western Europe and points across the US; his wife Priscilla (a Philadelphia born actress) and the couple’s two children were always in tow. This constant exposure to changing environments gave Poe and her brother (critically acclaimed novelist Mark Z. Danielewski) an early love of music as the universal language.

“I learned at a very young age that every one speaks a different language. Even if two people are both speaking English, their personal and cultural histories come into play—and not always amicably. Music, as a means of communication, can provide a way of transcending those differences.”

When at the age of 16, Poe’s parents divorced, she packed up and headed for New York City—where she lived in a squat with other alienated teens and sold fake subway tokens to pay for food. I t was there that she stumbled upon the wonders of multi-track recording. “I’d written songs on piano since age 8. Then I met this guy in Central Park who had a sampler and a 4 track in his apartment. I fell in love with the art of recording the day I got my hands on those machines. ”

At 18, Poe earned a full scholarship to Princeton, where she was able to continue honing her writing, production, and performance skills thanks to the wide-array of facilities available on campus.
“I had been living on my own since I was 16, and then all of a sudden I had access to al l these incredible resources. There were music studios, theatres to rehearse in, film and video facilities, and best of al l there were plenty of musicians who could come to a rehearsal without worrying whether or not they would make enough money to keep eating.”

Shortly after graduating from Princeton, Poe received devastating news that her father had been diagnosed with terminal cancer. She immediately left for LA and along with her brother (esteemed author Mark Z. Danielewski) stayed there to care for him until his death. “I really had no idea what to do next. All the musicians I had played with at school had moved on, and I had sold most of my recording equipment…I was at a loss. On a fluke I picked up the phone and cal led a guy named RJ Rice in Detroit. I had met RJ in a club in New York and we had subsequently exchanged CD’s of our music. I had really loved his stuff and the feeling was mutual. As luck had it , RJ still had a recording studio in his living room and he wasn’t up to much. So I packed my bags and stayed there with he and his wife writing and recording songs for a couple of months.”

Poe’s Debut Release
The results of that “fluke” led to the release of Poe’s 1996 Modern/Atlantic debut album, “Hello” which drew a dedicated fan base, in part, by the songs “Trigger happy Jack” and “Angry Johnny” -which went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts. The title track “Hello” became a club hit and went top 10 on the billboard dance charts. Based on the success of the album at radio, MTV began playing the videos, and that brought the whole thing to a new level. In 1997 “Hello” went gold and after ending an intense two and a half year stint on the road Poe began work on her 2nd album “Haunted”.

“I toured practically non-stop from 1995 to 1998 opening for various acts (Lenny Kravitz, Kiss, Sponge) and eventually I started headlining. The experience was exhilarating. Suddenly I had friends in almost every city in America, and thanks to the internet my fan base evolved quickly into an incredibly well connected community and a force unto itself.”

“Haunted”
Recorded entirely on Poe’s Mac 9600, the critically acclaimed “Haunted” was released in November 2001. The album tells a remarkable story about life, love, loss and the architecture of memory. Inspired by her discovery of a box of audio-cassettes containing “letters” that her father had recorded before his death, the creation of “Haunted” implemented technology in the most personal way imaginable. “I’ll never forget the moment I pressed play on a tape recorder and heard my father’s voice. A considerable amount of time had passed since his death, and yet here he was, speaking directly to my brother and I, sharing his thoughts about everything that was important to him. He said strange and wonderful things, things he had never told us when he was alive. Finding these tapes provided the necessary clues to uncovering a past I still hadn’t made sense of.”

Poe transferred the audio from these cassettes into her computer, utilizing her father’s voice as audience, critic, and beloved friend throughout the album. The completion of “Haunted” firmly established Poe’s reputation as a pioneering artist with tremendous vision and the talent to execute that vision.

“By this point in time I had also spent a number of years working very closely with my brother Mark Z. Danielewski on his novel “House of Leaves”. I’d written a number of songs that were inspired by bits of his writing and conversely, pieces of Mark’s novel had sprung out of songs that I had written. It was slowly becoming clear that my album and his book were in fact 2 parts of the same project. We were telling the same story in two different mediums and before “Haunted” was completed each song on the album was footnoted to 3 different narratives in the book.”

Still “Haunted”
Upon its release in 2000, “Haunted” seemed off to a very promising start. The album received a good amount of critical acclaim, and the press also responded enthusiastically to the connection between “Haunted” and my brother’s novel “House of Leaves”, which by that time had been published by Pantheon and was making sizable waves in the literary world. “Haunted’s” first single, “Hey Pretty” went top 10 on the alternative and modern rock charts--despite the fact that those formats had made a conscious decision to keep women out of their playlists. In addition, MTV put the video for “Hey Pretty” into rotation and Depeche Mode invited Poe to open for them on the US leg of their arena tour. “Haunted” was selling much better than “Hello” had in its first 6 months. In addition, Atlantic, excited by “Haunted’s” successful debut, renewed its option to continue their relationship with Poe and in doing so committed a good amount of funding to Poe’s future.

“I had every reason to feel very secure. If someone had told me at that point in time that I was about to be suddenly and inexplicably dropped from my label--I would not have believed them. But that’s what happened. Just as soon as the promotional cycle of “Haunted’s” release was gearing up, it was over.”

Through the odd twist of fate of artist and distribution deals, it turned out that the masters belonged to the owner of Modern Records -- meaning that in exchange for all of their investments, Atlantic, upon accepting delivery of my 3rd album, would be left with nothing. Atlantic ended their relationship with Modern Records---and sadly, with Poe as well. And that was then end of “Haunted”. With additional problems being faced with ownership of masters as well as future investments in Poe’s material, Poe was stuck in a crux for a number of years - the case finally settled in 2007. “My future now belongs to me and I’ve been writing tunes and re-building my life ever since.”

“Hello” Again
Spring forward to 2009 – Ford Motor Company’s decision to license the song “Hey Pretty” (now under the control of Sheridan Square Entertainment) in their 2009 Ford Flex commercials had great timing. “The fact this song has surfaced again on a national level, almost to the date of Obama taking office seems sublimely coincidental. It feels as though I have suddenly been given the opportunity to pick up where I left off--finishing what I started with “Haunted” in 2000 and carrying on from there with the support of a more artist friendly culture and climate.”

This breath of life in Poe’s work caused an influx of e-mails through Poe’s site--from long time fans excited by the songs and some from new fans who have never heard of Poe. “It’s like a déjà vu: here I am again promoting “Hey Pretty” and discussing “Haunted” as though the last 8 years never happened! Of course they did happen, and certainly a lot has changed; but the fact that more people may have a chance to hear that album, makes me happier than you can imagine. A lot of blood, sweat, and tears went into the making “Haunted” (on the part of myself and all the musicians involved in its production)…I never dreamed the album would have a second chance and thanks to Ford it does and I’m very grateful.

So What’s Next?:
Though Poe’s legal troubles kept her out of the public eye for a long time, they did not stop her from writing and creating music. “Music is almost a compulsion for me and I found solace writing and creating it the same way I always have. When the law suit ended I was at a crossroads in terms of what to do with all of the music I had on my drives and I had an over powering desire to start playing it with a band as opposed to simply finishing it in my computer. I listened to that instinct and in a stroke of luck ended up crossing paths with a few different musicians that are at the center of the music I’m making now.”

“I certainly don’t want to jinx it, but I will say that a sound is starting to emerge now that really excites me. Because it will still be a while before I’m ready to release a new album, I’ve decided to reach out to fans again and invite them to share in this process with us. I’ve started filming some of our recording sessions and will start posting them soon. I’m simply collecting unedited clips of the actual recording and writing process. The very moment at which a song comes into being can be pretty cool to witness and participate in--even as a spectator. If we do write something of value, or get that one magical take, or find that definitive melody or groove on a given night, I’d love for fans to be able to say that they were there with us when it happened.”

Only time will tell what strokes of genius Poe has yet to release on the world and in the meantime – “Haunted” has had a second chance with the world – one deserving of another listen if you haven’t already.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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