Poets and Murder: A Judge Dee Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.00
  • Save: $2.69 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Poets and Murder: A Judge... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Poets and Murder: A Judge Dee Mystery Paperback – November 1, 2005


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.31
$6.98 $3.84

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of January
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.


Frequently Bought Together

Poets and Murder: A Judge Dee Mystery + Necklace and Calabash: A Chinese Detective Story (Judge Dee Mysteries) + Murder in Canton: A Judge Dee Mystery
Price for all three: $33.94

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Rosie Effect
Bill Gates calls it "profound" -- check out Graeme Simsion's sequel to best seller "The Rosie Project," available now. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: The University Of Chicago Press (November 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226848760
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226848761
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,094,114 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The China of old, in Mr. van Gulik's skilled hands, comes vividly alive again." - Allen J. Hubin, New York Times Book Review "If you have not yet discovered Judge Dee, I envy you that initial pleasure.... For the magistrate of Poo-yang belongs in that select group headed by Sherlock Holmes." - Robert Kirsch, Los Angeles Times"

About the Author

Robert van Gulik (1910-67), a Dutch diplomat and an authority on Chinese history and culture, drew his plots and literary conventions from the popular detective novels that appeared in seventeenth-century China.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
5
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
Worth a reread.
Reggie & Abby
Great read, about an Ancient Chinese Magistrate, Judge Dee, "the Sherlock Holmes" of China.
Colleen
Contrasting with the wonderful family he has, with so much love.
Jean A. Donnel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Miz Ellen VINE VOICE on February 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
Judge Dee is the guest of his fellow magistrate Lo Kwan-choong who is also a dabbler in the art of poetry. A rich man, Lo's official residence is in the palace of the former Ninth Prince who was executed years ago for plotting against the Emperor. The banquet Lo is giving has a small but select guest list. Five illustrious poets, four men and a woman, all literary stars of the day feast on fine food, recite snatches of poetry and toast their host.

But during the fireworks display the dancer hired to perform for the company is murdered. Judge Dee knows that one of the guests must be guilty, but which one? He discovers that the crime actually has roots in the old plot against the Emperor...

This lovely atmospheric mystery has a simple but well-executed plot. I find myself returning to this slender volume time after time, not so much for the story as for the sheer aesthetic pleasure in contemplating the passion, poetry and literary atmosphere of ancient China.
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
As far as plot goes, this book isn't all that great. Van Gulik wrote his Judge Dee stories in his spare time and apparantly didn't have a lot of it. What makes this book worth reading, though, is the impecable recreation of classical Chinese society and Confucian social structure. That being kept in mind, this book is a worthy read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rodney Meek VINE VOICE on September 29, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This isn't the kind of book to pick up if you're looking for an intricate mystery full of twists and reversals, or for a thriller that will keep you eagerly turning the pages in a rush of excitement and dread. Good ol' Judge Dee doesn't really have to knock himself out too much to solve this problem; the clues and confessions practically come crawling and whimpering to him.
But if you're interested in a different setting than usual, this might be your...um...cup of tea. It's set in a China of hundreds of years ago, with a society that's different from the West in many of its attitudes but all too similar in basic human fears and needs.
The characterization is not too deep, but you can find a good amount of material here about customs and clothing and buildings and food. The period details, in other words, are really more important than the plot.
This is a good tool for a fantasy role-player doing some research for her next character. Or, if you only have a couple of hours and you need something to read, this slim little volume is not a bad choice. Just don't expect to be blown away in wonder.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Pollock VINE VOICE on March 8, 2014
Format: Paperback
GENERAL COMMENTS ON SERIES
Dutch diplomat and sinologist Robert Hans van Gulik (1910-67) apparently wrote 16 fiction & 1 translation of the exploits of historical Judge Dee (630-700 AD). He includes a short "Postcript" @ the end of most--worth reading 1st--esp. if it's your 1st one--woodcut type drawings/maps which greatly enhance the volumes and, in most novels, a "Dramatis Personae" list--especially valuable since it's divided up by case (most have 3 cases/book). The Postscript to "The Chinese Nail Murders" describes the author's approach to them--mostly based on old Chinese documents & their conventions towards magistrates--though he modernizes them somewhat. "Judge Dee at Work" includes a valuable chronology with dates. Usually a Magistrate spent ~3 years in a district & then transferred: Peng-Lai=663-6 AD, Han-Yuan=666-668, Poo-Yang=668-670, Lan-Fang=670-676, Pei-Chow=676-677, and (after promotion) to the Capital=677-700).

THE SERIES INCLUDES:
18 Judge Dee books (in alphabetical order with date): Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee (the one translation), The Chinese Bell Murders=668 AD, The Chinese Gold Murders=663, The Chinese Lake Murders=666, The Chinese Maze Murders=670, The Chinese Nail Murders=676, The Emperor's Pearl=668, The Haunted Monastery=666, Judge Dee at Work=663-70, The Lacquer Screen=663, The Monkey & the Tiger=666 & 676, Murder in Canton=681, Murder in Ancient China, Necklace & Calabash, The Phantom of the Temple, Poets & Murder, The Red Pavilion=668, and The Willow Pattern=677. Of the 18 books one is redundant, one is a translation, and the other 16 are fictional works by van Gulik.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By doc peterson VINE VOICE on December 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
On the recommendation of an amazon reader, (and being a fan of both mysteries and T'ang China), I picked up _Poets and Murder_. It was an entertaining read and a well put-together mystery, the real gem for me was the depiction of medieval Chinese life. The plot revolves around three murders: a scholar, an entertainer, and a recluse, with ancillary connections to a failed coup 18 years previously and a poetess accused of whipping her servant to death. The connections, overlap, truths and half-truths make for entertaining reading; Judge Dee a cleaver and observant the protagonist is a lot of fun to witness as he unravels the case. The reaveal - when the suspects are brought together to discover who the murder(ers) is (are) was a bit overdone, I thought - reminiscent of those old Scooby Doo episodes where the criminal "would've gotten away with it if not for those meddling kids," or perhaps Agatha Christie, where the wrong-doer collapses under the pressure of the presentation of the evidence. That said, Van Gulik does manage to pull one last suprise at the climax, which pleased me.

While I enjoyed the story - and I will read more by Van Gulik (apparently he wrote several mysteries with Judge Dee) - the real pleasure is the way China is written. The T'ang dynasty was to China what the Italian renaissance was to Europe: a period of commerce, a flourishing of the arts, and a golden moment when China opened itself to the wider world culturally as well as economically. The culture and social heirarchy of the time as well as the poetry are not only an integral part of the story, they elevate a so-so story to one that is above average. Recommended.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?