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Pointers from Nisargadatta Maharaj: Maharaj Points to the Eternal Truth is Before Time Ever Was Hardcover – February 1, 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Chetana (February 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8185300194
  • ISBN-13: 978-8185300191
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,434,226 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 30 customer reviews
It is Nisargadatta Maharaj at his most pointed.
NotClyde
That's one of the things that struck out, the book is very concise and has a nice pace to it that makes it graspable.
Zen
If you have already read "I Am That", then this book will likely unlock further understanding of its content.
Spira Mirabilis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 66 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have read several books on/by Nisargadatta. 'Pointers' is by far the the most enjoyable and informative. The dialogs presented are clearly organised and consise. While the answers seem to clearly address the questioners concerns, Nisargadatta's dialogs present a leap in understanding, expertly translated by Ramesh Balsekar. I have passed many of my Advaita books on to friends but will never part with this one. It truly is one of the best presentations of Advaita I've found. The Understanding presented seems works on many levels, making for a truly amazing 'read'.
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50 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Ned Kelly on April 4, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fantastic book that penetrates deeply and carries the presence of Nisargadatta. I have found that Eckhart Tolle's teachings made it easier to understand this book, and that this book helped me to listen/read Eckhart at a deeper level - in other words the teachings are completely complimentary and mututally reinforcing - after all there is only one teaching ultimately.

The way in which the book came about is very interesting, and it is good to know that Nisargadatta himself directly approved of this book. Nisargadatta makes many suggestions for a spiritual practice, which are highly practical and can be incorporated in daily life. Nisargadatta himself became Self Realized though a specific practice, and outlines exactly what others should do.

The Appendices are a bit complicated - that does not matter as the main message is in Nisargadatta's words, which fills 95% of the book.

Highly recommended and when you are finished read "I AM THAT"
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56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By jog@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu on November 23, 1998
Format: Paperback
Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj is perhaps not as well known as Jiddu Krishnamurti, Osho or Alan Watts. Ramesh Balsekar's "Pointers from Nisargadatta Maharaj" is a concise work reflecting the essence of Maharaj's teachings. Those who found Maurice Frydman's "I am That" too exhaustive will find this book refreshing. The reading itself can be a powerful experience. One is never the same again! Balsekar's strengths lie in his ability to clearly yet forcefully encourage the reader to sincerely question everything. The message that enlightenment cannot be attained by volition is important and must be fully grasped.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By P. DAVIS on February 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
In Pointers From Nisargadatta Maharaj, devotee Ramesh Balsekar provides further insight into the teachings of what many consider a master of Advaita Vedanta. The teachings are both simple and profound -- and often full of paradox. To "understand" them requires the relinquishment of thought. To "explain" the teachings reduces them to concepts which are inherently false. That is probably why the book it aptly titled "Pointers..." The real truth, according to what Balsekar shares of Nisargadatta's teachings, is "apperceived" directly. And it's based on the deep understanding that there is no individual entity at work...

"The main point in Maharaj's teaching is that in this living-dream of life we are not the dreamed characters, which we think we are, but that we are the dreamer, and it is our mistaken identification with the dreamed character, as a separate independent entity as the 'doer', that causes the illusion of 'bondage'". Pages 202-203

If you have read the classic "I Am That", this is an excellent aid in providing further clarification into our true nature. Enjoy it for all the gifts it brings you.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jon on September 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
Pointers from Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj is, in my opinion, the clearest testament to realisation ever committed to paper. Beyond stating that, there really is nothing else for me to add.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Bruce McElhaney on August 1, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are ready this book is all you'll ever need, if not it will certainly plant the seeds of awakening. Not only does Ramesh Balsekar translate the words of Maharaj, but goes on to expand and clarify the wisdom of his Guru as only an enlightened disciple can. This is the perfect follow up for Maharaj's classic, I Am That. But Please don't let your mind be put off by Nisargadatta's gritty approach. Because of the Guru's declining health, this book's tone does sound a bit harsh by ignoring common civilities and going straight to the core of truth. Yet that is exactly what we need to realize.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Zen on April 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
At first I was a bit nervous about getting this book when I found out that it is not a transcript of Nisargadatta's discourses. It is actually Balseker writing on topics that he recalled from working and translating with Nisargadatta. Of course this can make one uneasy since most people don't have enough of a grasp to write a book on Nisargadatta's work with real authority. I got it anyway thinking that if after about 3 chapters, if I didn't like it, I'd return it. What a pleasant surprise. The book is very clear and true to Nisargadatta's teachings and somehow manages to be a bit simpler at times to comprehend then I AM THAT. That's one of the things that struck out, the book is very concise and has a nice pace to it that makes it graspable. It makes you investigate the question of "Who or What are you?" Maharaj encourages us to understand Consciousness/Beingness until you comprehend that you are not the body.
If your a fan of Nisargadatta, this is a nice addition to I AM THAT.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Lake Waters on January 1, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have become familiar with advaita thought over the past 7 or 8 years. If your considering this book you are most likely familiar with a number of its proponents and their writings.

"I Am That" seems to be the most popular work attributable to Nisargadatta. There are also a handful of others offering direct transcriptions of his talks. There are also quite a few books out now written by Ramesh.

Having read (or attempted to read) the other works, I can easily say that there seems to be no better combination than having the words of Nisargadatta being directly translated by Ramesh. To me, it seems the impersonal knowledge which Nisargadatta shares on the personal level with his questioners is brilliantly transmitted within the translation by Ramesh; they are just a fantastic team.

Each small chapter/segment of the book is self-contained and never strays from the questioners inquiry; the times when Nisargadatta seems to stray from the question you still feel the connection between him and the questioner. I believe that is what sets this book apart from the others. Ramesh somehow places us in both the Questioner's seat as well as Nisargadatta's seat during the discourses.

After having read "Pointers" I found that the translations in "I Am That" seemed slightly distant from Nisargadatta himself. It's probably a personal preference on my part, but I found Ramesh's personal writings to be somewhat dry or sterile, again, my preferences and maybe not your own.

If you have found the other Nisargadatta books lacking, you really should give this one a try.
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