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The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right to the City (Critical Social Thought) Paperback – March 23, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0415802246 ISBN-10: 0415802245 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Critical Social Thought
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (March 23, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415802245
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415802246
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Refreshingly, [Lipman] is attempting to seek answers, as she probes the ways in which the changing urban landscape has shaped (re-shaped) urban education…Like the rest of us, [she] holds out hope in this book for a transformation of values and of systems, so that everyday people can reclaim the public sphere, public schools, and continue to hold accountable those responsible for governing our everyday lives."—Teachers College Record

"In this incisive intervention, Paula Lipman offers a devastating critique of the "common sense" assumption that markets can solve enduring urban problems such as racial exclusion, concentrated poverty and public school "failure." Written with theoretical authority and elaborated through extensive on-the-ground analyses of contemporary Chicago, this book provides the most comprehensive exploration to date of the bitterly contested interface between neoliberal urbanism and educational policy. This is activist scholarship at its very best: Lipman's call for a new "right to the city" oriented towards human flourishing and social justice rather than private profit will resonate powerfully among all those struggling to roll back and supersede contemporary forms of market fundamentalism."—Neil Brenner, Professor of Sociology and Metropolitan Studies, New York University

"In cities throughout the United States, fierce battles over the future of American education are being waged. In this important new book, Pauline Lipman explains why the conflicts over charter schools, the role of parents and teacher unions in school governance, and the closure of ‘failing schools,’ is fundamentally related to who will control the future of American cities. Using Chicago as setting for her analysis, Lipman explores the dynamics within the struggles that have occurred in public education in recent years and the underlying interests that propel the protagonists. This detailed and illuminating study is a must read for anyone seeking to understand how the controversies over education policy will shape America's future."—Pedro A. Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University

"This book confirms Pauline Lipman’s reputation as an outstanding critical education scholar. A must read for anyone who cares about urban education, it shines a light on the ways in which the privatization of urban schooling excludes and subordinates low income and minority populations and shows what might be done to build a more democratic and socially just alternative."—Sharon Gewirtz, Professor of Education, King’s College London

About the Author

Pauline Lipman is Professor of Educational Policy Studies in the College of Education, University of Illinois-Chicago.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Cantor on April 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
Lipman lays out the case that the current push in education reform is more about political and economic ideology than about improving schools for the students who are least well served by public schools. She shows how school "turnarounds" specifically, and privately run charters in general are used by mayors and other policy makers to gain political points and make new urban neighborhoods "safe" for the upper middle class while further marginalizing low income families - specifically in non-white communities. Many people are realizing that "school choice" is not working to improve public education, but Lipman points out why charters and turnarounds are still being pushed despite evidence that they are no better than neighborhood schools. It's more about real-estate development, conservative ideology and municipal power than about education. The book is a pleasure to read because it includes hard data along with stories of parent and teacher activists working to save their schools from destruction. The chapter on venture philanthropy is especially helpful for understanding the role that the huge foundations are playing in this hostile takeover of urban neighborhood schools. This is a must-read for anyone trying to get a complete view of the current education reform landscape. Lipman connects the dots.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ryan owen on October 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As an educator I read a lot of material about the politics and ideology of the current education climate in America and around the world. I'll keep this short and to the point, much like the book. In all I have read I have yet to find such a well thought and worked through connection between the social and political ideology of neoliberalism and the call for educational reform. The book is very specific to Chicago public schools and how neoliberal ideology has shaped the education debate in that specific school district and part of the country. However many, if not all, of the points and connections discussed translate to cities and districts across the country. The book is full of personal excerpts from students, parents, and teachers as they way in on the state of education and the schools they frequent. Highly recomend this book for any one even at all interested in the over education debate in this country, from teachers to citizens without children. This book lays out nicely how we have gotten to where we are in the current debate and spells out who all the players are and what kind of roles they play. As mentioned above it's short and a quick read, well worth the time.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Uveida Woolens on March 11, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can read it. it is in good condition Everyone should this book it is worth it. If you want to learn anything about politics
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