Political Suicide and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Political Suicide Paperback – April 17, 1995


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.98 $0.01
Textbook Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Countryman Press/Foul Play Press; New edition edition (April 17, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881503266
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881503265
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,818,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When the body of MP James Partridge is dredged from the Thames, more fuss is made of the empty seat in the House of Commons than of the conscientious politician's probable suicide. Looking for leads, Superintendent Sutcliffe of Scotland Yard follows the three leading contenders as they scramble for support in the quickly organized Yorkshire election. The Tory contender is slick and opportunistic, the Labour man charismatic but unreliable, and the local Alliance candidate one whose electoral appeal has already proven limited. Sutcliffe turns up plenty of shady doings, and worse, in the candidates' histories, and his final solution reminds that in politics and murder, personalities are always more germane than issues. Author of Fete Fatale and Death of an Old Goat, Barnard has mastered the unpredictable, credible plot, and writes with warmth and mellow wit.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Robert Barnard is a critic, lecturer, and crime novelist. He was awarded the Cartier Diamond Dagger in 2003, in recognition of his outstanding lifetime contribution to the crime genre.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By kellytwo on March 31, 2001
Format: Paperback
Many of Robert Barnard's books are satire. It is such a trick to not go too far when writing satire, and I have yet to observe him putting a foot wrong. This somewhat elderly book is no exception.
Somewhat elderly, because it was first published in 1986, a lifetime and a half ago, when it comes to politics, in Britain--or the US! None of the higher-ups are named in this book, so it's a safe read, anyway, except for the damage you may do to yourself by laughing too hard!
The Tory MP for East Bootham (a dreary little place that is a casualty of the economic wars and located in far Yorkshire) James Partridge by name, has apparently committed suicide by jumping off a bridge into the Thames. Or did he?
Mixing the events taking place behind the scenes leading up to the new by-election for Partridge's replacement with the very subtle investigation of his death by the about-to-be-retired Superintendant Sutcliffe of the London Police, allows the reader to see many sides of what could be a one-dimensional picture. There is also, of course, the ever present media, digging ever deeper into backgrounds and foregrounds.
In the end, the Superintendant solves the puzzle, which will leave you chuckling as you finish the tale, even though justice is probably not well-served. But then, this IS about politics. Remember?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael Schau on August 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
This Barnard mystery is so entertainingly wry and such a page-by-page pleasure that the murder and the whodunit are almost incidental to the telling. In this one Barnard skewers the British polictical system top to bottom -- from opportunistic PM to dim-witted voter -- without resorting to forensic clues or Holmesian detection or red herrings. It probably helps to be something of an anglophile and more than a little cynical to get the most of Barnard's insights and deft verbal political cartooning.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
Political enthusiasts in particular should enjoy this Robert Barnard mystery, in which a shrewd superintendent inquires into the death of James Partridge, a quiet, well-mannered Tory, who, before his untimely demise, represented East Bootham, Yorkshire, in the House of Commons. Was it murder or suicide? Are Partridge's family and friends grieving, or moving on with their lives with suspicious quickness? Did any of his potential successors -- or their contributors -- benefit disproportionately from Partridge's death? Barnard's book smoothly resolves these questions even as it gives the reader the unique flavor of a parliamentary by-election. Worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John F. Rooney VINE VOICE on July 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
Robert Barnard in his crime novels veers often from his Dickensian caricatures to his Swiftian satire and irony that spear a great deal of English social and political life. He can be quite cutting and misanthropic; it's difficult to find many likeable, admirable characters in his cast of mostly selfish, nasty, grasping, mean-spirited, and petty monsters. His humor saves him from being condemned as solely as an unpitying commentator.
He's a born storyteller who keeps you whipping through his stories, effortlessly and enjoying the ride, though you won't be able to avoid his rapier thrusts of cynicism and sarcasm. He thrives on dissecting the British class system, and he can be just as cutting with the rich as the poor. His sympathies reside in the craft of writing. His frequent use of a nasty newspaper called The Grub, his own creation, show his great disdain for the press, reporters and the media.
In "political Suicide" (1986) James Partridge, a Tory member of Parliament ends up quite dead in the Thames. Police Superintendent Sutcliffe investigates, suspecting murder. He finds that the M.P.'s Bootham constituents in Yorkshire were rather indifferent to him. The unnamed prime minister for the Tories was Margaret Thatcher at this time, a frequent target of Barnard's jibes. He has only negative barbs for the country's leader throughout the book. Partridge was trying to get an animal rights bill through the House that would provide for more humane treatment of animals particularly on factory farms, but the bill was very unpopular within his own party.
Partridge and his uppity wife are separated; the man had no friends and was a loner. The whole book deals in considerable detail with the election campaigns of the three men vying to replace the dead House member.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?