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Political Theory of Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Case for the World State (Routledge Innovations in Political Theory) Paperback – September 3, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0415770668 ISBN-10: 0415770661 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (September 3, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415770661
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415770668
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,307,657 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'A useful contribution to the growing field of literature on cosmopolitanism because of its focus on institutions.'

Amy E. Eckert, Political Studies Review 

'This book is a valuable contribution to the field. In addition, Cabrera's background as a journalist is evident and his writing style makes the book a pleasant, as well as informative, read.'

Amy E. Eckert, Political Studies Review 

'Luis Cabrera has the courage to state a truth long shrouded in denial. If we are serious about treating persons with equal respect, we must work toward the creation of a democratic world government. Using a variety of moral and empirical arguments, Cabrera shows that such a transformation is not only desirable but also possible. He responds skilfully to numerous objections, and develops a humane, reasonable, and realistic program of institutional reform. This is a comprehensively researched, boldly original, and powerfully persuasive book that no student of global justice can afford to miss.'

Jamie Mayerfeld, University of Washington, USA

About the Author

Luis Cabrera, a former staff reporter for The Associated Press, teaches political theory and global politics at Arizona State University West, USA.

More About the Author

Luis Cabrera is Associate Professor in International Relations at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. His academic research focuses on institutional changes above the nation-state to promote the protection of individual rights. His most recent book, The Practice of Global Citizenship (Cambridge University Press 2010), seeks to identify the universal human duties that correspond to individual economic and political rights. His theoretical claims were informed by extensive field work at sites of intense unauthorized immigration in the United States, Mexico, and Western Europe. It was awarded the Yale H. Ferguson Prize from the International Studies Association-Northeast in 2011 for innovation in multi-methods inquiry.

His 2004 book, Political Theory of Global Justice, offered an argument based in distributive justice for democratically accountable political integration above the state, up to some form of fully global government. His current book project, The Humble Cosmopolitan: Rights, Diversity and Global Democracy, explores appropriate accommodation of diversity within projects of democracy beyond the state. He has conducted extensive field work for it in India, Turkey and Western Europe.

He currently serves as global Vice President of the professional association Academics Stand Against Poverty: www.academicsstand.org He previously taught at the University of Birmingham (UK), and Arizona State University. Prior to completing his PhD at the University of Washington in 2001, he worked as a staff reporter for The Associated Press in Seattle (USA).

l.cabrera@griffith.edu.au

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Review on September 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Political Studies Review

Volume 3 Issue 3 Page 456 - September 2005

Reviewer: AMY E. ECKERT

(Metropolitan State College of Denver)

Luis Cabrera's Political Theory of Global Justice makes a useful contribution to the growing literature on cosmopolitanism because of its focus on institutions. Many recent explorations of cosmopolitan justice have dealt primarily or solely with universally applicable principles. While Cabrera does spend some time on the arguments against and in favour of a cosmopolitan order, his focus is on institutions. Those who have proposed institutional restructuring, notably Thomas Pogge and Andrew Kuper, have remained in a minority. Cabrera argues that the implementation of universally applicable principles, notably the right of each person to live a decent life, requires some politically restructuring. Like Pogge and Kuper, Cabrera also proposes a dilution of sovereignty. Against the Westphalian system Cabrera offers a globally integrated alternative. This system of integration would include democratic institutions above the state, like a European Union (EU) composed of individuals rather than states, alongside partially sovereign states and sub-state communities. In addition, Cabrera envisions cross-cutting institutions that fulfil issue-specific purposes. The combination of these two types of structures makes Cabrera's institutional cosmopolitan ap-proach unique. In addition to spelling out an ideal set of institutions, Cabrera also proposes a roadmap about getting from here to there. In effect, if the functionalist analysis of EU integration is correct, global economic integration will likely lead us to some form of political integration on the global scale.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Review on February 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
Reviewer: AMY E. ECKERT

(Metropolitan State College of Denver)

Luis Cabrera's Political Theory of Global Justice makes a useful contribution to the growing literature on cosmopolitanism because of its focus on institutions. Many recent explorations of cosmopolitan justice have dealt primarily or solely with universally applicable principles. While Cabrera does spend some time on the arguments against and in favour of a cosmopolitan order, his focus is on institutions. Those who have proposed institutional restructuring, notably Thomas Pogge and Andrew Kuper, have remained in a minority. Cabrera argues that the implementation of universally applicable principles, notably the right of each person to live a decent life, requires some political restructuring. Like Pogge and Kuper, Cabrera also proposes a dilution of sovereignty.

Against the Westphalian system Cabrera offers a globally integrated alternative. This system of integration would include democratic institutions above the state, like a European Union (EU) composed of individuals rather than states, alongside partially sovereign states and sub-state communities. In addition, Cabrera envisions cross-cutting institutions that fulfil issue-specific purposes. The combination of these two types of structures makes Cabrera's institutional cosmopolitan approach unique.

In addition to spelling out an ideal set of institutions, Cabrera also proposes a roadmap about getting from here to there. In effect, if the functionalist analysis of EU integration is correct, global economic integration will likely lead us to some form of political integration on the global scale.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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