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The Politically Incorrect Guide to the British Empire (The Politically Incorrect Guides) Paperback – October 24, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: The Politically Incorrect Guides
  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Regnery Publishing; 1 edition (October 24, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596986298
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596986299
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Politically Incorrect Guide™ to the British Empire

“As someone who grew up in India, I often hear people ask, ‘What have the British done for us?’ Until I read this book, I didn’t have the full answer. And here is Crocker’s answer: ‘Apart from roads, railways, ports, schools, a parliamentary system of government, rights, separation of powers, checks and balances, the rule of law, and the English language... nothing!’”
—Dinesh D’Souza, President of the King’s College and best- selling author of The Roots of Obama’s Rage

The Politically Incorrect Guide™ to the British Empire offers a cautionary tale for Americans who don’t believe the sun could ever set on our great land. Even the grandest nations collapse when a people no longer believes in itself or its mission. Harry Crocker’s book is a jolly good read for Anglophiles and history buffs in general.”
—Brett M. Decker, Editorial Page Editor of The Washington Times and former Governor of the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents’ Club

“H. W. Crocker’s Politically Incorrect Guide™ to the British Empire is a vivid, wide-ranging and persuasive defence of an empire that spread freedom, democracy and the rule of law.... and a testimony to those old virtues—grit, leadership and the stiff upper lip—which were taught to British children of my generation, and which are being air-brushed from history by the cult of political correctness. This brave and persuasive book deserves to be read in all courses of school history: it tells an inspiring story in an inspiring way.”
—Professor Roger Scruton, philosopher and author of more than two dozen books, including A Political Philosophy: Arguments for Conservatism

About the Author

H. W. Crocker III is a bestselling author who frequently writes about military history. He is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide™ to the Civil War, Robert E. Lee on Leadership, Triumph, Don’t Tread on Me, and the prize-winning comic novel The Old Limey. His journalism has appeared in National Review, The American Spectator, The Washington Times, and many other outlets. Educated in England and California, Crocker lives on the site of a former Confederate encampment in Virginia.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Well written, light and informative.
Colin Murphy
I enjoy the Politically Incorrect series and already own several on various subjects.
Kent
I was surprised at some of the things I learned by reading this book.
N. J. Brooks Jr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Gweilo on November 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
Reviewed by Brett M. Decker, Editorial Page Editor of The Washington Times:

London-based financier Robert Agostinelli predicted to a mutual dining companion recently that I would only order Sapphire and tonic for pre-supper cocktails. "In his mind, drinking Bombay gin is one little way to help keep the Empire alive," the chairman of the Rhone Group explained, pointing out that a portrait of Queen Victoria adorns every bottle. And he was right. Seemingly minor habits mean a lot for the tweedy set that worships Evelyn Waugh, suffers to keep old Jaguars running and names their offspring after English monarchs.

The zeal of Anglophiles tends to be overdone - like food in Old Blighty - because it needs to compensate for an anti-historical political correctness that has infected academia, twisting an objectively positive institution - the British Empire - into something bad. One writer has done more than hoist a few G&Ts for queen and country. Harry Crocker's new book, "The Politically Incorrect Guide to the British Empire," sets the record straight about the small island that governed a quarter of the planet and had a civilizing influence on the rest of it.

This politically incorrect guide is true to its name and doesn't shy away from controversial subjects. It carefully recounts how Britannia used the Royal Navy and land forces to put the African slave trade out of business, to the chagrin of many Americans. The author also explains that the blood feud between the Irish and their British overlords wasn't originally over religion (both lands were Catholic), but rather, "England regarded Ireland as an uncongenial, barbarous, mystifying colony - but one necessary for the defense of the realm because it was an all too convenient jumping-off point for possible invasions.
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Jennings on November 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the PIG British Empire, Harry Crocker reminds me why I have always liked the Brits. They just kicked butt in nearly every aspect of civilization for centuries and Harry lays it all out for you in this concise and blissfully politically incorrect history. The best traits of our country (the USA) can be traced to the British Isles and the statesmen, soldiers, poets, churchmen, drinkers and passionate patriots that went forth from its shores decade after decade. God Bless the British.
Or at least those born before about 1960. The sad aspect of this delightful book is the comparison it makes, unwittingly or not, with today's England. We Americans can hope that the land of our fathers can teach us one last and critical lesson--not to do what they have done.
Read the book and rejoice that Britain ruled most of the world as long as it did.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By H. S. Wedekind VINE VOICE on December 19, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"My ugly boy Arthur is food for powder and nothing more." - the assessment of Arthur Wellesley's loving mother.

That ugly boy, with a rather large nose, eventually saved England from the man with a large ego, Napoleon, and became the 1st Duke of Wellington. I'm sure his mother did love him. I mean, all mothers are supposed to love their children. Aren't they? I guess we'll never know. But Arthur does grow up to be the very symbol of England's Bulldog tenacity...or am I thinking of Lord Nelson?

In this immensely readable and entertaining book, we are given a brief, but never boring, look at early Great Britain's gallant defenders of the Imperial Crown. From the dirty streets of 19th century London to the bloody streets of 20th century Belfast and to the far reaches of the BE before and between, comes a book about the men who lived among the Bedouin (T. E. Lawrence), stopped the practice of suttee (the burning of a Hindu man's wife after his own death) in India, as well as the African slave trade. It was through the exploits and "God is an Englishman" certainty of those men who believed in themselves and who were absolutely sure that what they were doing was both honorable and right that much good was done and much wickedness was arrested.

If you are interested in actual history, and enjoy reading about the exploits of Englishmen (and Scots and Irishmen) like Raleigh, the pirate Captain Henry Morgan, "Chinese Gordon", and Lords Kitchener and Louis Mountbatten, then I highly recommend this book. If, on the other hand, you are looking for a condemnation of such men as being racist, colonialist exploiters and hate mongers, then this is definitely not the book for you. 5 Stars.
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40 of 48 people found the following review helpful By M. Lynch on October 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
Three cheers for H. W. Crocker and his wonderful book. As an American, and devoted tea drinker, I appreciate this book, and the British Empire for two reasons. First, I like speaking English, and secondly, I really like tea, as well as Sweet Tea whenever I'm in Dixie. I can thank the British Empire for both. But more than that, I appreciate living in a land where the rule of law is protected. As the news on any given day demonstrates, a nation of laws is not a universal right, except in most lands where the Union Jack once was raised. This was a gift from the British to the rest of us. In the last several decades, it was the British who stood with the United States, shoulder to shoulder, when our way of life was threatened, or as the bard wrote , "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers." H. W. Crocker had done a Magnificent job of explaining this epic tale. Well done!
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