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Politicians Don't Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness (Studies in Communication, Media, and Public Opinion) Paperback – June 21, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0226389837 ISBN-10: 0226389839 Edition: 1st

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Politicians Don't Pander: Political Manipulation and the Loss of Democratic Responsiveness (Studies in Communication, Media, and Public Opinion) + Democracy and Deliberation: New Directions for Democratic Reform + Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government Is Smarter
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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Communication, Media, and Public Opinion
  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 21, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226389839
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226389837
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #818,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Lawrence R. Jacobs is the director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance at the Hubert Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota.

Robert Y. Shapiro is associate professor of political science at Columbia University.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By David C. King on August 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a wide-ranging, theoretically rich and empirically focused look at whether politicians simply "follow" the polls or whether politicians use polls to help "sell" proposals to the public. The answer is both, of course, but Jacobs and Shapiro explain how and why public leaders develop their own policy views, and how the public's acceptance of those views shape how policies are ultimately formed. Politicians are "trustees" in the Burkean sense, but how they explain their actions have to be placed in a "delegate" framework. Their case study on health care policy is especially instructive. This book won the 2001 Goldsmith Book Prize, it should be read by serious students of the media and politics.
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14 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book has been widely touted, so I talked two other political scientists into plowing through it for our reading group. We found the book to be a major disappointment.
The authors have an argument to make, but the quality of their qualitative and quantitative evidence is at best uneven. The survey analysis seldom includes multivariate tests and the interview sources, while extensive, are episodically not comprehensively analyzed. By the end of the book, we had little confidence that the conclusions the authors presented were well supported by their evidence.
It's a readable book, but it is difficult to put much faith in
its conclusions.
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1 of 93 people found the following review helpful By Miles Carter on July 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Reading this book, one phrase kept floating to mind - dash it all. I think..... well, I don't know. This book, er, doesn't do justice to the concept of intercounty by-elections, what?
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