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Polydoxy: Theology of Multiplicity and Relation Paperback – November 4, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (November 4, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415781361
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415781367
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,434,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is an incredibly profound collection that unsettles the theologian into a clearing of questioning and construction. Young theologians should take upon themselves the task of reading and digesting this text. Yet “old” theologians must not become weary or fearful of this collection, for this work arrives from the multiplicity of Christian orthodoxy. Polydoxy signals a thoroughly postmodern constructive text. This is precisely what theologians have needed, and will continue to need, to construct postmodern theologies."

- Zachary Bailes, Wake Forest University - School of Divinity, USA

 

"This important book launches a new movement in theology which, while solidly grounded in Christian heritages, is groundbreaking in its refreshing openness to multiple methods and sources. I highly recommend it!"

- Kathryn Tanner, Professor of Systematic Theology, Yale Divinity School

 

"Intellectually bold and theologically sound, this well-composed volume offers thought-provoking essays on the multiplicity of Christian orthodoxy. A must read for theologians and philosophers interested in vibrant and engaged theologies."

- Maaike de Haardt, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands

 

"A remarkable collection, multi-faceted yet deeply interconnected in values and emphases. Page by page, example by example, one watches ‘polydoxy’ transform from a mysterious neologism into an indispensable means for labeling something one always wanted to name but couldn’t quite: the unexpected possibility of religious language, even hope, in an age grown leery of theology. At stake here is nothing less than the space of (eco-)community with each other and with the divine: ‘different not separate, distinct not divided’."

- Philip Clayton, Claremont School of Theology and author of Adventures in the Spirit

About the Author

Catherine Keller is a leading contemporary theologian. She is Professor of Constructive Theology at Drew University, USA, and author of The Face of the Deep.

Laurel C. Schneider works on multiplicity theory and is author of Beyond Monotheism. She is Professor of Theology, Ethics, and Culture at Chicago Theological Seminary, USA.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Zachary Bailes on May 17, 2011
Format: Hardcover
As the 21st century forces of globalism grow stronger the challenge, is now, to understand them. Affected by these forces are not only markets and governments, but theology as well. Polydoxy attempts to meet, head-on, the challenge of globalism through reframing and refreshing theological discourse. The ongoing Transdisciplinary Theological Colloquium at Drew University, which in it's ninth annual meeting focused upon Polydoxy, made this volume possible. Voices within this volume include those from theological schools that do not always shape the predominant theological thought. This is a helpful fact, and one that illustrates the decentralizing activity Polydoxy suggests.

As I read this volume I found many of my intuitions realized. In my own theological studies I have found a noticeable lack of reckoning with the multiplicities at work within theological studies. In the Introduction Keller and Schneider state, "As invitations to polydoxy, these essays do not let go of creative divergences and stubborn tensions. They variously point to an incarnational depth in the world from which Christian faith and teaching might renew itself" (4). In a world confused by the effects of globalism and a theological world uncertain of future developments, this resolute voice should provide hope for the young (and old) theologian.

I cannot in fewer than 500 words provide an accurate depiction of this volume. That is not because it is too complicated, too difficult, or even simply "bad." The voices within the volume provide varied and rich possibilities for this fresh, never-before-seen world. Polydoxy takes our preconceived notions of pluralism and enriches them.
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