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Poore Boys In Gray Kindle Edition

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Length: 233 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 432 KB
  • Print Length: 233 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Talented Scribbler Productions; 1 edition (January 21, 2012)
  • Publication Date: January 21, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0070ORUP2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #633,978 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Ralph Poore grew up amid Civil War forts and battlefields in Mobile, Alabama. He is a former newspaper reporter and editor, and a former spokesman for a Fortune 500 company. He lives in Boise, Idaho.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joe Lee on July 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Many books have been written about the Civil War, but author Ralph E. Poore gives you something that many of the history books don't have: a perspective seen through the eyes of a Mississippi family whose sons who left the life they'd always known to defend the Confederacy.

Originally from Mobile, Alabama and a resident of Boise, Idaho, Poore writes of his ancestors in Poore Boys in Gray in a way that not only puts you right there on the battlefield, but takes you behind the scenes of the war effort and describes the heavy toll the Civil War took on so many families.

Seen largely through the eyes of Francis Poore, the oldest son of a farming family from Newton County, Poore Boys in Gray begins in the cotton fields as the Poore's struggled to make a living in the years leading up to the War Between the States. The first chapter provides crucial discussion of the variety of reasons so many young adult males enlisted: an adventure that would take them far from home, a chance to prove their manhood, and the chance to fight for a cause many friends and neighbors believed in.

The Civil War buff will certainly enjoy reliving the battles, which range in location from Corinth to Fredericksburg, Virginia to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. What might catch you off guard, though, is a reminder of how primitive medical care was in those days--just as many soldiers from Union as well as Confederate ranks died of disease and malnourishment as did those killed in action. And it's a tad unsettling to be reminded that General Stonewall Jackson, who was accidentally shot by his own men, died eight days later of pneumonia. (He was replaced on the battlefield by General Jeb Stuart.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gramma M on March 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book very much! It was a new experience to learn about a real family's war experiences from a Southern perspective. The book held my interest, and taught me about battles of which I had previously learned very little.

Good job, Mr Poore!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Francis, John, and William Poore were three brothers from Mississippi who fought the span of the Civil War, from Francis at Manassas to John at Appomattox. All three survived. These men are relatives of author Ralph Poore. By tracing their steps, he has given us a stunning insider's account of the day-by-day toils of fighting for the Confederacy. Extremely well-researched, Poore Boys in Gray is by turns thrilling and horrifying as it relates, battle by battle, the fortunes of the Army of Northern Virginia from the brothers' imagined perspectives. It is a pulse-pounding book.

Seen from within the 13th Mississippi Infantry Regiment, the Civil War as a story unfolds from the exhilaration of rebel yells and victories, through grinding lengthy standoffs, sudden defeats, and piles of corpses to the idle boredom of winter camp, periods of starvation and insufferable hardship, and eventually the desperate "Alamo" of Fort Gregg and heartbreaking defeat. It is a long, sad trip home to a devastated South for the Poore boys.

Poore Boys in Gray is packed with information. We learn the military strategy and terrains and fortifications and casualties for each battle. We read copious, documented first-hand accounts of surprises on the battlefields and the soldiers' variations in morale. We suffer with them through disease outbreaks, stark fluctuations in food and clothing supplies, and exhaustion from interminable battles. Both Francis and William were prisoners late in the war, and the deadly conditions of two Yankee prison camps are described in detail. John surrendered at Appomattox as one of the last 74 soldiers from an original Mississippi Infantry Regiment of 1,000.

Before I read the book, I thought of the Civil War from a historical distance. Now I can fully imagine what it was like to be a soldier in that terrible and ravaging war.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is an excellent and creative narrative of the major battles fought by Ralph Poore's three Confederate ancestors, particularly the two who were in the famed Thirteenth Mississippi Infantry Regiment of Lee's army.

The author's challenge was to write of these three brothers who left no diaries or letters about their wartime experiences. He pulled it off admirably by placing them in a historical timeline through their official Confederate muster records and in the context of the published diaries and letters of other men who served in their units. He also relied on independent historian Jess N. McLean's wartime timeline of the men of the Thirteenth Regiment.

But Poore also plumbed census and other documentary evidence (including family lore) to piece together the pre- and post-war genealogies of the brothers which makes the story much more interesting. All in all a worthy addition to the thousands of histories and historical novels about that horrible war which nevertheless freed millions and whose effects still echo down the years to us.
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