Popes and Bankers and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $3.42 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Popes and Bankers: A Cult... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: LIKE NEW CONDITION WITH NO DAMAGE! A+ CUSTOMER SERVICE! 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE! FAST, SAME BUSINESS DAY SHIPPING!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Popes and Bankers: A Cultural History of Credit and Debt, from Aristotle to AIG Paperback – March 15, 2010

91 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.57
$1.03 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$11.57 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Popes and Bankers: A Cultural History of Credit and Debt,  from Aristotle to AIG + Hoodwinked: How Intellectual Hucksters Have Hijacked American Culture
Price for both: $25.06

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jack Cashill has written for The WSJ, Washington Post, Weekly Standard, and regularly in the American Thinker and WorldNetDaily. Recent books include Hoodwinked, Sucker Punch, and What's The Matter With California. Jack has a Ph.D. from Purdue.
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 70%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (March 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595552731
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595552730
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (91 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #605,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Beth on March 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
One of the things Mr. Cashill is known for is illuminating the true circumstances around events which others have spun to produce a desired outcome. Reading his retelling of these stories has the effect of upending much of what you thought you knew.
In this particular book he takes the time period from Aristotle to present day and successfully strings together the intriguing stories into a narrative that was a joy to read.
What I found particularly interesting were the historical developments related to anti-Semitism; beginning with the role of philosophers, theologians, and institutions trying to grapple with the issue of profit making from loans(rather than from producing goods) and their pronouncements regarding the morality of this activity, contrasted with those such as Marx who would find useful the negative associations related to the the success of Jews in European finance "huckstering" to support their agendas.
The book does a very good job of explaining the development of credit dependency and the complex financial products brought into being without making your eyes glaze over. In fact, it's quite fascinating.
It is not at all a dark view of history, but a web of human action covering a range of motivations from the desire to create a just and moral society to the expansion of wealth for all to the exploitation for personal gain or ideological purpose. And the effect is kind of heart wrenching. There are wonderful surprises throughout which bring a smile to your face, such as Institutes having been written by John Calvin at age 26.
Not to be missed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Evelyn Uyemura VINE VOICE on May 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The writing here is sharp and witty, with almost every paragraph ending in some sort of a zinger, often connecting ancient history to some current event. And the scope and depth of the cultural history included here is astonishing, from a synopsis of The Inferno and The Merchant of Venice to paraphrases of the latest financial best-sellers, with some Flannery O'Connor thrown in for good measure. The writer is obviously a talented and erudite man.

The first thing that puzzled me, however, is that this book is published by Thomas Nelson, mainly known as a Bible publisher based in Nashville. Huh, that's odd. And then the book begins with an anecdote about a woman who defaults on her over-priced mortgage, the punch line of which is that her problem is that she is a prodigal.

The history of debt and credit then is undertaken, and the point is that both Judaism and Catholicism, as well as much of secular ancient thought, considered money-lending to be a serious sin. The sin of usury was roundly condemned, and it meant not the charging of excessive interest, but the charging of interest at all. In its place, the rich were recommended to give generously to the poor, not to entrap them in pay day loans.

While this point comes across loud and clear throughout the historical section of the book (and while virtually no mention is made of any ancient moral precepts condemning the poor for trying to scrape by through borrowing money), the author strains to make the point that it is the fault of greedy borrowers, rather than greedy lenders, that is really the problem that tanked the economy.

His history of the US economy may be considered somewhat less than objective, since Murray Rothbard is his primary source.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By World Traveler on April 22, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very pleasant surprise - highly recommended. Light in tone, very broad in scope of subjects and disciplines touched on (truly multidisciplinary in approach). This entertaining and informative book presents a (subjective) approach to understanding the "Great Recession's" roots in credit and debt, economic history and interesting people. Author uses various books for each chapter, which he seems to summarize and bring out most salient information. Author does an excellent job of explaining and simplifying complex issues.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brett Farrell VINE VOICE on May 2, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is an interesting and fast paced romp through the world of economics. You could never use this book as reference should you be writing a report on the history of money however. It does not start as much but definitely leans heavily towards a biased prospective of non-governmental regulation and conservative values. I can't imagine the author is anything but a libertarian. There is nothing wrong with that (depending on whom you ask anyway) but it definitely leans very heavily in that direction and if you were looking for an impartial view on the current mess, you won't find it here. It makes some very good arguments though.
The book was a good read and I couldn't put it down. It's certainly motivated me to do some of my own historical research into past methods of banking and lending and given me an interesting view and starting point.
If you are looking for an in-depth look into financial histories, this is not it. It is merely highlights of economics as they were formed and affected the western world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Parker Benchley VINE VOICE on August 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Having just gone through an economic crisis that we will continue to feel the effects of for a long time coming, some may wonder just how the credit market works. If you are one of those, this is the book for you. It is a well-written and jocular history of credit, beginning with Aristotle and continuing to the present. Cashill traces the beginnings of credit, differentiates it from usury, and notes how credit, once despised in the Middle Ages, came to be accepted as an integral part of the Capitalist system that arose in the Renaissance. He also traces the history of bubbles (our recent crash most likely was due to a housing bubble) from the tulip bubble in Holland to the English South Seas bubble and beyond. The crashes, panics and depressions that have plagued America almost since its inception are also examined and explained in easy to understand language, avoiding the technical terms that force non-specialists to shut their eyes. Overall, highly recommended for anyone who wants to learn the basics of the credit system.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Popes and Bankers: A Cultural History of Credit and Debt,  from Aristotle to AIG
This item: Popes and Bankers: A Cultural History of Credit and Debt, from Aristotle to AIG
Price: $11.57
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com