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The Poppet and the Lune Paperback – March 9, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 358 pages
  • Publisher: Unknown Press (March 9, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615480551
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615480558
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,417,917 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The Poppet and the Lune is nothing short of a rejuvenation of a dying genre. It is fresh, original and brilliantly plotted..." -- Word Vagabond Book Reviews

"...atmospheric and wonderful and so, so well done... Franklin's writing is beautiful." -- The Bookworm Shelf

"From the very first few lines, the atmosphere rolled out under me like a lush carpet... invading the reader's mind... Come and dip yourself in this story of love, loyalty, and hope." -- Cabinet des Fées Magazine

"Five stars is not enough." -- Sarah Diemer, award-winning author of The Dark Wife

From the Inside Flap

The Poppet and the Lune

A girl constructed from the remains of a tragedy, given life by witchcraft and magic...

A cowardly boy running from his destiny, trapped in the form of a wolf...


When the witch who made her is murdered, will the patchwork girl ever discover the purpose of her creation?

Will the wolf boy, Faolin, ever find a way to shed his wolf skin and become human again?

Join Faolin and the patchwork girl on their extraordinary adventure through the Everwood Forest, where they must face all manner of monsters and men, danger and opportunity, and learn for themselves the difference between them. An enchanting story of love, loyalty, and hope, this is a true fairy tale for adults and children of all ages.

More About the Author

Madeline Claire Franklin has been writing, making movies, telling lies, and otherwise creating stories for as long as she can remember. She holds a BA in Media Studies/Production with a minor in Anthropology from the University at Buffalo, where she further expanded her storytelling capacity through film, animation, and the study of the human race.

In addition to her love of telling stories and researching dead people, Madeline is an avid traveler and lover of foreign cultures. She has contracted salmonella in Costa Rica, was bitten by a goat in the Sahara Desert, got salt in her eyes at the Dead Sea, and her pants once caught on fire while she was walking down a street in Spain. None of this deters her.

She currently resides in Buffalo, NY.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I would highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys fantasy and/or fairy tales.
C. Marcuri
Reminiscent of Grimm's fairy tales in all of their macabre glory, this book transcends the genre with well developed characters that you really care about.
Coronita Cerveza
The story is engrossing with enough twists and turns in the plot to keep you fascinated.
jedigirl77

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. Arendt on August 11, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
(From my blog at [...] - Reviews of independent and small press publications.)

After tragedy strikes a small village, killing all of its children, the villagers strike a deal with their local witch to create a new child, a patchwork of those who died, to replace those they have lost. With great reluctance, the witch complies, and soon produces Elizabeth, the "Poppet" referred to in the title. The witch is killed before the process is completed, leaving Elizabeth with many unanswered questions and a fragile identity. Throughout her many adventures, her search for the truth of her existence remains her main motivation.

The "Lune" is Faolin, a reluctant werewolf who becomes Elizabeth's loyal companion, protector and friend. He has a compelling story of his own, neatly sidestepping the categories of mere sidekick or romantic interest (although he does, in part, fill both these roles). In fact, all of the characters in The Poppet and the Lune resist being pigeonholed, either with intriguing backstories or with a pervasive aura of mystery that leaves one wondering about them long after the story is over.

The Poppet and the Lune is nothing short of a rejuvenation of a dying genre. It is fresh, original and brilliantly plotted, with characters that the reader cares about easily and deeply. It steers clear of most of the common clichés, and offering up genuine surprises in their place. I honestly believed that I knew where the main character's story arch was leading, but the ending was both different and better than I expected.

It's hard for me to review this book without sounding completely giddy and uncritical, so I hope the reader will understand that this is a very unusual reaction for me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christine on August 5, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
...Easy-to-read, wonderous story.

Created from the remains of a tragedy that struck a simple village, the patchwork girl is a being of pure magic. When she leaves her home(s), her journey takes us through the Everwood Forest, into the clutches of Father Time, the depths of the castle of the charming Prince Baylis and into the very pits of the kingdom of the Weremen.

From the remains of the other children, she eventually discovers herself, and we along with her.

If I had any critiques to make, is that the novel has several sections where I felt it could have been the thrilling end to any fantasy novel, only to discover that I had 40% remaining on my e-reader's progress bar. These would have made equally amazing novellas, or two fantastic novels.

This is a charming read that would satisfy any fantasy lover and thrill them to their fingertips. Madeline Claire Franklin is absolutely a new rising star of fantasy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathon K on May 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Poppet and the Lune takes fantasy away from the more typical swords and sorcery and into something more magical and philosophical. Aside from the storyline, the author's lyrical and mellifluous writing style makes this book a pleasure to read.

This is a story of a girl who is created from the parts of many children, yet who doesn't know just who or what she is. When the children of a small village are killed by a tragic accident, the parents of the children convince the local witch to bring a new child to life. The witch salvages the undamaged parts of the dead children and makes a patchwork girl, a girl who is then shared by the families of the dead children. She is named Elizabeth by the families, a name which never seems to resonate with her.

When the families have other children, they lose interest in the patchwork girl, and eventually, she leaves the village in an attempt to find someplace in which she fits. Meeting Faolin, a somewhat cowardly wereman, she goes from adventure to adventure while trying to discover her place in the world.

The strength of this novel is in the wordsmithing. The author turns poetry into prose. The first chapter flows along as if in a song. The words are lovingly selected and placed just so to evoke the strongest reaction and feeling of the reader. The rest of the book flows as well from this outstanding beginning.

The patchwork girl, with her mismatched eyes, is one of the most endearing characters about whom I have read in quite some time. I felt for her. I understood her dreams and needs. I wanted to reach into the novel and speak to her, to reassure her. For someone who has a dearth of her own emotions, she emotes to others.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is without a doubt one of the greatest books I have ever read. I loved it from beginning to end. It was a beautiful, magical story with great moral lessons and just all around amazingness. (Is that not a word? I don't even care.)
If I had my way, this story would become the next big animated fairy-tale hit of the century. I can't get over how great it is!!! Recommending to everyone for the rest of my life.
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A sweet and easy read and yet it will have you interested till the end. Great for adults and kids although has some mild violence and death.
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By Alysa H. on March 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Although the author has since re-released this novel in four separate parts, _The Poppet and the Lune_ really is one whole novel and I read it as such.

This is an old-school kind of fairy tale that does not shy away from the gruesome. I absolutely loved the first section, wherein we meet the "Patchwork Girl" made of magic and moonlight and the salvaged parts of a village's dead children, as she learns about herself as well as the ways of humanity. I enjoyed the second section, too, as the girl and her new companion Faolin (a wereman: usually a wolf but sometimes a man) find themselves in the castle of a prince with suspicious intentions and meet all of the other neato characters who have gathered there. Taken together, these sections are a great read and also offer many subtly feminist messages about identity and personhood.

The latter half of the book was a lot less successful. The action shifted back into the forest, and Faolin's point-of-view is made more prominent than the girl's. I did like both of these characters, but the girl's story is far more compelling and unique than the wereman's, so one really feels the relative lack of it. Especially during an extended period when the girl is very much sidelined, reduced literally to a "poppet" and not just in name only. This was done partly in service to a love story between the two, as Faolin must learn to gather his courage and rescue the girl. The romance was sweet in its way, but a bit predictable and certainly not the best thing in the book. The elevation of the love story over the more interesting elements brought the whole thing down.

The writing is overall lovely and I look forward to reading more from this author. I'd be very curious to see what she'd do with a more contemporary setting, or with what she'd come up with if asked to produce a retelling of a "famous" fairy tale.
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