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Popular Eugenics: National Efficiency and American Mass Culture in the 1930s Paperback – November 21, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press; 1 edition (November 21, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0821416928
  • ISBN-13: 978-0821416921
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,041,097 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Susan Currell is a lecturer in American literature at the University of Sussex and the author of The March of Spare Time. Christina Cogdell is an assistant professor of art history at the College of Santa Fe and the author of Eugenic Design: Streamlining America in the 1930s.

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This book provides an important survey of the impact that eugenics had on popular culture in America. Long thought to have been isolated to science in the twenties, this book makes clear that eugenics was a driving force behind a wide range of popular culture products in the thirties. Note: The cover Wegee image is from an exhibit at ICP that explored eugenic photography.
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