Buy New
$29.95
Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.99
  • You Save: $10.04 (25%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Sold by westcoastmedia and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Porterhouse Blue has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.75
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Porterhouse Blue
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Porterhouse Blue

10 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
2-Disc Version
$29.95
$19.95 $23.96
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$7.03

Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime
Start Your 30-Day Free Trial of Amazon Prime Stream thousands of movies & TV shows anytime, anywhere. Start your free trial
$29.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Sold by westcoastmedia and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Porterhouse Blue + Porterhouse Blue
Price for both: $43.41

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Product Description

A hilarious romp through the hallowed halls of British academia

For more than 500 years, Porterhouse College has cherished tradition above all else. Unfortunately, its traditions mostly involve decadent banquets, drunkenness, and undistinguished scholarship. Enter Sir Godber Evans (Ian Richardson, Bleak House, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy), a new master hell-bent on reform. Of course, the dinosaurs on the faculty resist him at every turn. But Head Porter Skullion (David Jason, A Touch of Frost) emerges as Sir Godber’s most formidable foe -- a self-appointed guardian of Porterhouse’s most hallowed traditions, with plenty of tricks up his tweedy sleeve.

Based on Tom Sharpe’s uproarious bestseller, Porterhouse Blue crackles with dry wit and bristles with satirical barbs. It punctures British pomposity in Oxbridge and beyond, taking dead aim at dotty dons, stodgy aristocrats, hypocritical reformers, and TV reporters. Winner of an International Emmy® and two BAFTA Awards (including David Jason’s for Best Actor), Porterhouse Blue rewards viewing after viewing with fresh laughter.

DVD FEATURES INCLUDE bio of author Tom Sharpe and cast filmographies.

Amazon.com

Porterhouse Blue begins as an insular lampoon of stuffy British academia but rapidly escalates to dizzyingly absurd--even grotesque--heights of satire. Porterhouse College (a fictional part of Cambridge University) has lost another Master to a Porterhouse Blue, a stroke induced by the college's legendary excess in food and drink. But the newly appointed Master, Sir Godber Evans (Ian Richardson, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy), is a former Porterhouse student with a dim view of its traditions. Egged on by his progressive wife, Evans proposes to encourage scholarship, admit women, put contraceptive vending machines in the bathrooms, and eliminate the large staff of college servants--which incurs the wrath of the college's head porter, Skullion (David Jason, A Touch of Frost). As Skullion maneuvers to foil Evans' plans, a student named Zipser (John Sessions, Gormenghast) wrestles with his lust for his housekeeper, a passion with explosive results. Over the course of four hour-long episodes, the college's meager dignity is destroyed by media scandal, a masquerade orgy, and a courtyard swarming with gas-filled prophylactics. The excellent performances rise from a low boil to a furious pitch of indignation, desperation, and revenge. Anglophiles will enjoy the freewheeling bite of the humor, which compares with Evelyn Waugh's caustic wit. The unusual soundtrack, by a-cappella group the Flying Pickets, adds to the miniseries' unique flavor. --Bret Fetzer

Special Features

  • Bio of author Tom Sharpe
  • Cast filmographies

Product Details

  • Actors: Ian Richardson, David Jason
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Acorn Media
  • DVD Release Date: June 26, 2007
  • Run Time: 200 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000NVKZWO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #102,909 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Porterhouse Blue" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The master has just died...of a Porterhouse Blue. That is, of a stroke brought on by overindulgence. Long tradition insists that the masters of Porterhouse College name their successors, and that is to be the last man named by a dying master. Porterhouse, a very traditional college in the Cambridge mode of English privileged education, depends on all of its complacent traditions. "You know my view," says the Dean of Porterhouse, "if a little learning is a dangerous thing, just think what harm a lot of it can do." The college is so traditional, in fact, that its rights and privileges haven't changed in centuries. The deans and tutors seem just as ancient. However, the dying master did not name a successor. With no successor, the Prime Minister steps in and chooses a new one...Sir Godber Evans (Ian Richardson), a weak but sly fox of a politician with a wife, Lady Mary (Barbara Jeffords), who is as strong-willed and zealous as an executioner's axe. Sir Godber, however, is about to come up against two bastions of self-satisfied tradition, the Dean (Paul Rogers) and the Senior Tutor (John Woodnutt). But not even in Sir Godber's worst dreamings could he envisage the real defender of Porterhouse tradition...Skullion (David Jason), the head porter, a man who has been a fixture at Porterhouse for 45 years, who knows all the secrets and who keeps lists. Skullion is not a man to be trifled with.

Sir Godber and Lady Mary are determined to haul Porterhouse into the Twentieth Century. Finding that the college is in debt by a million pounds -- it maintains a fine cellar and chef for the High Table -- doesn't seem upsetting to those who have the long view.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
This is vintage British snob comedy with a distinctly blackish tinge.

It is far from faultless. The whole subplot involving Zipster (no gentleman as Porterhouse College interprets the term, but a poor, bedeviled scholarly swot condemned to write a thesis on the impact of pumpernickel on medieval Westphalia) is silliness of a woefully lower standard than that of the main plotline with its contentedly corrupt and sleepily self-indulgent Cambridge college suffering at the hands of a reformist-minded new Master. Nevertheless, the actors--icily smarmy Ian Richardson, doggedly determined David Jason, ultra-conservative über-alumnus Charles Grey and a corps of utterly dotty college dons--are given opportunity after opportunity to delight. Just listen to the deaf-as-a-post college chaplain as he genially explains how the college started out as a brothel and has carefully maintained its traditions for five hundred years.

This four-part TV series from the late 1980s has finally made it across the Atlantic for the enjoyment of anyone with a taste for echt-British humour. Four stars.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. O. DeRiemer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 26, 2006
Format: DVD
The master has just died...of a Porterhouse Blue. That is, of a stroke brought on by overindulgence. Long tradition insists that the masters of Porterhouse College name their successors, and that is to be the last man named by a dying master. Porterhouse, a very traditional college in the Cambridge mode of English privileged education, depends on all of its complacent traditions. "You know my view," says the Dean of Porterhouse, "if a little learning is a dangerous thing, just think what harm a lot of it can do." The college is so traditional, in fact, that its rights and privileges haven't changed in centuries. The deans and tutors seem just as ancient. However, the dying master did not name a successor. With no successor, the Prime Minister steps in and chooses a new one...Sir Godber Evans (Ian Richardson), a weak but sly fox of a politician with a wife, Lady Mary (Barbara Jeffords), who is as strong-willed and zealous as an executioner's axe. Sir Godber, however, is about to come up against two bastions of self-satisfied tradition, the Dean (Paul Rogers) and the Senior Tutor (John Woodnutt). But not even in Sir Godber's worst dreamings could he envisage the real defender of Porterhouse tradition...Skullion (David Jason), the head porter, a man who has been a fixture at Porterhouse for 45 years, who knows all the secrets and who keeps lists. Skullion is not a man to be trifled with.

Sir Godber and Lady Mary are determined to haul Porterhouse into the Twentieth Century. Finding that the college is in debt by a million pounds -- it maintains a fine cellar and chef for the High Table -- doesn't seem upsetting to those who have the long view.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard B. Schwartz TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 25, 2013
Format: DVD
Porterhouse is an ancient Cambridge college, with permission from Elizabeth I to kill/eat stuffed swans as part of its banquet inaugurating a new Master. The wining and dining is so excessive at Porterhouse that it results in a particular form of devastating stroke, a `Porterhouse Blue'. When a dying master speaks the name of another Porterhouse worthy, that individual succeeds him. This can, of course, give rise to a series of significant plot points.

Into the decadence and fussiness of Porterhouse comes Sir Godber Evans, a former graduate and former politician, now married to a rich, politically-progressive aristocrat. Their plan: to stress academics, take Porterhouse co-ed, build `Lady Mary Hall' (named for Godber's wife, Lady Mary) and install a condom machine. The latter is necessary, Godber argues, because the natural inclinations of the young must be properly channeled. Prior to that conclusion, a graduate student in love with his bedder (housemaid) has clumsily acquired several boxes of condoms. Realizing he must somehow dispose of them, he fills them with natural gas from the fireplace and releases them up the chimney. Those that do not decorate the quad, collect in one of the college's towers and explode, destroying that part of the edifice.

Godber is opposed by the feckless fellows but principally by the college porter, John Skullion, who has served Porterhouse for 45 years. As the conflict escalates, an old college grad (who received a 2.2) offers to produce a television program on the college's condition. Intended to be a carefully-edited hatchet job, the presenter underestimates Skullion, who appears on the program and speaks his mind.

The center of the story turns on performances by Ian Richardson as Godber Evans and David Jason as Skullion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in