Possession 2002 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(162) IMDb 6.4/10
Available in HD
Watch Trailer

Two literary sleuths unearth the amorous secret of two Victorian poets only to find themselves falling under a passionate spell.

Starring:
Gwyneth Paltrow, Aaron Eckhart
Runtime:
1 hour, 43 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Possession

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Mystery
Director Neil LaBute
Starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Aaron Eckhart
Supporting actors Jeremy Northam, Jennifer Ehle, Lena Headey, Holly Aird, Toby Stephens, Trevor Eve, Tom Hickey, Georgia Mackenzie, Tom Hollander, Graham Crowden, Anna Massey, Craig Crosbie, Christopher Good, Elodie Frenck, Victoria Bensted, Shelley Conn, Jonty Stephens, Alexi Kaye Campbell
Studio Focus Features
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

I give this one 2 stars for the period sequences.
L. Daniels
I think the film is a wonderful and clever adaptation of the book Possession merging past & present perfectly together.
Lili_K
Wonderful acting, beautiful direction, and one of the most amazing love stories ever seen in a movie.
E. A Solinas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

73 of 75 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 12, 2003
Format: DVD
"Possession" is one of the most romantic movies I have ever seen, alongside Tom Tykwer's "Heaven." A double-edged tale of love, passion, and words that can entice or betray, this is one of the few masterful films that actually brought tears to my eyes. Wonderful acting, beautiful direction, and one of the most amazing love stories ever seen in a movie.
Roland Michell (Aaron Eckhart), a brash young American scholar, is studying an old book of the famed poet William Randolph Ash when he encounters an old love letter. After some digging, he theorizes that it was addressed to the more obscure poet Christabel LaMonte -- but both poets were either married or in a long-term relationship. If he's right, it would rock the literary world. He seeks the help of Maud Bailey, a cold feminist scholar who has a particular fondness for Christabel's work. Maud tries to bring him down to earth by explaining that Christabel was a lesbian, but Roland is undaunted.
They travel to Christabel's old home and unearth a cache of letters between Ash and Christabel, hidden away by her lover. It tells of a love affair that was doomed from the start: The correspondence first inspired respect, then friendship, then a burning love. Finally, Ash (Jeremy Northam) and Christabel (Jennifer Ehle) escape to the countryside for a few weeks alone. Those few weeks will mar the rest of their lives...
Like all adaptations, "Possession" strays a bit from its original work (Roland is made American rather than English, many supporting characters are omitted). But the spirit and tone of the story are close to the book. The core of the story is words.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Kathy on August 22, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I must disagree with the scathing reviews I have read here. I have become very jaded with movies...a long line of endless clones blending together. This movie stood out from the crowd!

I was totally captivated and am throughly enchanted each time I watch it. I love the skillful way in which the producer entertwined the past with the present. It was as though the past love affair had transcended time to envelope the modern couple. They recognized the love of the past couple and came to experience it themselves.

I could feel how spellbound the modern couple was in discovering the details of the past, and how it affected them as a couple falling in love. The way the new loves went to the same places and viewed the same scenery with the same awe was very well done. You could sense them moving through the same stages of their love affair, although their circumstances were different.

I disagree that the modern couple was not perfectly cast.

They were the perfect contrast and made the victorian couple all the more entralling. I found all 4 actors/actresses completely believable and perfect for the story. They all possessed a sensualness and passion that was quite palpable.

The love scenes were very tastefully done and not at all vulgar and explicit as some are these days.

The first time that I saw this movie, I found myself caught up in both romances...feeling the longing, joy, and dispair of starcrossed lovers; feeling the trepidation, yet excitement,

and overwhelming pull of the new love as they discovered not only the love of the past, but their own growing love.

I think this movie shows how love transcends time.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
65 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 16, 2003
Format: DVD
"No mere human can stand in a fire and not be consumed."

While doing research in the British Museum, Roland Michell (Aaron Eckhart) discovers letters written by Randolph Ash who had an affair with a lesser-known poetess, Christabel LaMotte.

Maud Bailey (Gwyneth Paltrow) knows Christabel's poems by heart and Randolph seeks her out as an expert to help him figure out why a "chaste spinster" and the "married Randolph Ash" never revealed their love to the world. He has one clue, a love letter.

Christabel and Randolph's love is based on a common love of literature and intellectual discussions, poetry and passion. They are like minds that somehow connected and together they find immense happiness despite their circumstances. Although they fight their attraction to one another, they eventually create a world of turmoil and tragedy.

Gwyneth and Aaron have a subtle chemistry but it is not "quite" the mingling of spirits that occurs with Christabel (Jennifer Ehle) and Randolph (Jeremy Northam) and yet there are enough sparks to keep them interested.

"I want to see if there is an us in you and me."

Is passion worth the turmoil and upheaval? Is this the tangle most people want? While the story of the poets is only a memory, Maud and Roland are just starting their journey and are fortunately single when they meet.

Maud and Roland lurk about in divine libraries searching for clues and discover old letters and journals. They are intoxicated by the thought that they can actually solve this mystery. They must conceal their true purpose while searching for clues.

They spend time reading the letters to each other, which is the most romantic "modern" part of this movie.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again