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Postmodern Imperialism: Geopolitics and the Great Games Paperback – June 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Clarity Press (June 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 098335393X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983353935
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #717,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Those who think that the "Great Game" played for control of Central Asia is a superannuated relic of Europe's imperial past must read Walberg's epic corrective to their egregious error. In extensive, richly textured and carefully documented detail he reveals the evolution of this competition into the planetary quest for dominance it has become, as well as the imperatives animating its new "players," among whom many will find, to their surprise or consternation, tiny Israel and its symbiotic liaison with America Inc. Prime imperial architect, Zbigniew Brzezinski actually called the blood-soaked playing field The Grand Chessboard, but like all his rapacious forebears omitted to mention the pawns. Walberg places them at the heart of this much needed remediation of the sinister falsehoods propagated in a political culture manufactured from above and offers hope that this anti-human playboard may yet be overturned." -- PAUL ATWOOD, American Studies, University of Massachusetts and author of War and Empire: The American Way of Life (2010)

"Walberg's book is a sharp and concise energizer package required to understand what may follow ahead of the Great 2011 Arab Revolt and related geopolitical earthquakes. It's a carefully argued--and most of all, cliche-smashing--road map showing how the New Great Game in Eurasia is in fact part of a continuum since the mid-19th century. Particularly refreshing is how Walberg characterizes Great Games I, II and III--their strategies and their profiteers. Walberg also deconstructs an absolute taboo--at least in the West: how the US/Israeli embrace has been a key feature of the modern game. It will be hard to understand the complex machinery of post-imperialism without navigating this ideology-smashing road map." --PEPE ESCOBAR, roving correspondent for Asia Times, author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving into Liquid War (2007)

"Imperialism is as alive today as in the days of the original Great Game. Central Asia and the Middle East are as strategically important today for the US and Great Britain as they were in earlier games, if for different reasons. Postmodern Imperialism is a continuation of Kwame Nkrumah's Neocolonialism: The Last Stage of Imperialism (1965) and carries forward the struggle of the pen against the sword." --GAMAL NKRUMAH, international editor, Al-Ahram Weekly, Cairo

"Walberg's provocative work traces the transformation of the imperial world through the twentieth century. It is a valuable resource for all those interested in how imperialism works, and is sure to spark discussion about the theory of imperialism and the dialectic of history." --JOHN BELL, author of Capitalism and the Dialectic (2009)

"Eric Walberg's treatise on the Great Games, on Empire, is an excellent read. It is not a blow by blow account of the rise and fall of empires involved with the Great Games, but an accounting of their methods and raison d'etre. It is a dense read, provocative, bold, touching on ideas that seldom appear in mainstream presentations. It is a significant and important addition to the geopolitical and political-military thinking of the global cultural environment of finance and wars." -- Foreign Policy Journal, July 22, 2011

"Those who think that the "Great Game" played for control of Central Asia is a superannuated relic of Europe's imperial past must read Walberg's epic corrective to their egregious error. In extensive, richly textured and carefully documented detail he reveals the evolution of this competition into the planetary quest for dominance it has become, as well as the imperatives animating its new "players," among whom many will find, to their surprise or consternation, tiny Israel and its symbiotic liaison with America Inc. Prime imperial architect, Zbigniew Brzezinski actually called the blood-soaked playing field The Grand Chessboard, but like all his rapacious forebears omitted to mention the pawns. Walberg places them at the heart of this much needed remediation of the sinister falsehoods propagated in a political culture manufactured from above and offers hope that this anti-human playboard may yet be overturned." --PAUL ATWOOD, American Studies, University of Massachusetts and author of War and Empire: The American Way of Life (2010)

"Walberg's book is a sharp and concise energizer package required to understand what may follow ahead of the Great 2011 Arab Revolt and related geopolitical earthquakes. It's a carefully argued--and most of all, cliche-smashing--road map showing how the New Great Game in Eurasia is in fact part of a continuum since the mid-19th century. Particularly refreshing is how Walberg characterizes Great Games I, II and III--their strategies and their profiteers. Walberg also deconstructs an absolute taboo--at least in the West: how the US/Israeli embrace has been a key feature of the modern game. It will be hard to understand the complex machinery of post-imperialism without navigating this ideology-smashing road map." --PEPE ESCOBAR, roving correspondent for Asia Times, author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving into Liquid War (2007)

"Imperialism is as alive today as in the days of the original Great Game. Central Asia and the Middle East are as strategically important today for the US and Great Britain as they were in earlier games, if for different reasons. Postmodern Imperialism is a continuation of Kwame Nkrumah's Neocolonialism: The Last Stage of Imperialism (1965) and carries forward the struggle of the pen against the sword." -- GAMAL NKRUMAH, international editor, Al-Ahram Weekly, Cairo

"Walberg's provocative work traces the transformation of the imperial world through the twentieth century. It is a valuable resource for all those interested in how imperialism works, and is sure to spark discussion about the theory of imperialism and the dialectic of history." -- JOHN BELL, author of Capitalism and the Dialectic (2009)

About the Author

is known worldwide as a journalist specializing in the Middle East, Central Asia and Russia. A graduate of University of Toronto and Cambridge in economics, he has been writing on East- West relations since the 1980s, He has lived in both the Soviet Union and Russia, and then Uzbekistan, as a UN adviser, writer, translator and lecturer. Presently a writer for the foremost Cairo newspaper, Al Ahram, he is also a regular contributor to Counterpunch, Global Research, and Al-Jazeerah. His articles also appear in Russian, Spanish, German and Arabic.

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37 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Kevin J. Barrett on July 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
Walberg's Postmodern Imperialism: Geopolitics and the Great Games is the best introduction to geopolitics that I have seen. Walberg begins by citing such classic theoreticians as Mackinder, Haushofer and Ratzel in his description of how the imperial center drains the resources of its periphery, and how the earth's geography has dictated a struggle between Eurasian land powers (Russia, China, Germany, Islamdom ) and maritime rimlands (US, Britain, Japan) in which the latter are generally the aggressors -- though you wouldn't know that from their propaganda, which is probably all you ever see if you live in the West.

Walberg traces the evolution of Great Game I (pre-Russian revolution) into Great Game II (the Cold War era) and finally Great Game III (today's US-British-Israeli war for world conquest). Unlike the functional psychopaths who dominate in Political Science departments and policy-making positions, Walberg never loses sight of the almost unimaginable depravity of the whole enterprise, and the tidal wave of human suffering in which imperialism has nearly drowned the world.

What makes Walberg's book a real stand-out -- and what probably made it unpublishable by the major corporate houses -- is his honest analysis of the way the hardline Likudnik Zionists have seized power and dominated Great Game III. Though Walberg does not come right out and say that 9/11 was staged by the Mossad as a Zionist coup d'état, that is the unstated implication of the picture he paints, in which Zionist interests in destabilization and sheer mindless destruction of their Islamic enemies have trumped US interests in stabilizing and exploiting the Islamic rimlands.
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Format: Paperback
I read a lot -- across 98 categories (access my Amazon reviews via category at Phi Beta Iota the Public Intelligence Blog). WITHOUT HESITATION, this book is easily a solid five. Early in the book I have it as a four, annoyed by the shallowness of some of the pieces and the error on Jonathan Pollard--this treasonous scum-bag went to other countries before he got to Israel, in no way is he a Jewish hero, only a traitor--but by the time I finish the book I am tempted to go with a six (10% of my reading). It is a solid five. Those that think less of this book are missing the knowledge foundation necessary to appreciate what the author has done in 300 pages covering the last hundred years.

Two foundation books for appreciating this work include Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time and The Naked Capitalist. Current books that bracket this one, the first cited by the author, include Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and Rule by Secrecy: The Hidden History That Connects the Trilateral Commission, the Freemasons, and the Great Pyramids.

I mention those up front to frame my view of this book as a serious combination of scholarly research and investigative journalism. Had the author included a who's who of key individual players as an appendix, this would have been a six.
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By Anthony on May 12, 2014
Format: Paperback
Eric Walberg's book is easy to follow, it's written for the lay reader
while at the same time dealing with a complex subject. The book explores
what the powers that be have been up to. He traces the stages of the rise
of imperialism through 3 stages, termed Great Game 1, 2 and 3.

A good book if you want to understand the world today, as well as what led to the dire
situation we are in.
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8 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Milo Jones on March 26, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book posits that since the term "Great Game" (shorthand for the competition between Russia and Great Britain in the mid-to-late 19th Century) appeared, two forces have successively opposed "Imperialism". The first force that it says opposed imperialism was "communism".

Let's examine that idea for a minute. The idea that Communism opposed Imperialism would be news in the 1920s to (among others) Ukrainians, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Kyrgyz, Kazakhs, and all the peoples of the Caucasus region. And wasn't there also that Soviet invasion of Poland in the 1920s? Then there's that rather awkward deal that the USSR made with the Nazis until they're double crossed, that included the killing in cold blood of the cream of Polish intellectual life and their aristocracy (luckily, at Katyn the NKVD made films of how to liquidate class enemies on a large scale which they later used to train the North Koreans: you've got to capture "best practice" somehow if it is to spread). Then, of course, the USSR kept numerous countries in Eastern Europe in their Imperium by force (think Hungary in 1956; the Czechs in '68), etc. Meanwhile, anti-Imperialist Communists in China invaded Tibet in 1950s, and helped the hellish experiment that is North Korea "succeed", before funding violent guerrilla movements along the periphery of China.

In short, if words have meaning to you, you will find this book is utter rubbish - the worst sort of "black is white" pseudo-intellectual posturing.
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