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Postmodern and Wesleyan?: Exploring the Boundaries and Possibilities Paperback – June 1, 2009


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Postmodern and Wesleyan?: Exploring the Boundaries and Possibilities + The Story of God: A Narrative Theology + If God Is God...Then Why?: Letters from New York City
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City (June 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0834124580
  • ISBN-13: 978-0834124585
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,213,744 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Postmodern and Wesleyan? is an excellent resource for your small group or Sunday School class. The essays provide stimulating insights from the past and investigate possibilities for our tomorrows. Any class that enjoys meaningful conversation will find a broad range of perspectives on why we live as we do and how we can adapt to a rapidly changing world. The probing questions at the end of each chapter will penetrate your assumptions and engage your class in life-shaping discussions. --Woodie Stevens, SDMI Director, Church of the Nazarene<br /><br />The writers in this volume are postmoderns or those who are uniquely positioned to understand postmodernism. This volume gives us an opportunity to hear their voices and dialog with their ideas so that we can better discern what the church might look like in our changing culture. I encourage you to read this volume with a spirit of curiosity and expectation. --Vickie Copp, Professor, Nazarene Theological Seminary<br /><br />This book models what the Church should practice in an often tumultuous culture. It suggests constructive ways for the church to navigate the promises and perils of living in a postmodern culture, it welcomes those with differing views to join in the conversation, and each chapter closes with good, critical questions that draw the reader into the dialogue. --James Hampton, Professor, Asbury Theological Seminary

The writers in this volume are postmoderns or those who are uniquely positioned to understand postmodernism. This volume gives us an opportunity to hear their voices and dialog with their ideas so that we can better discern what the church might look like in our changing culture. I encourage you to read this volume with a spirit of curiosity and expectation. --Vickie Copp, Professor, Nazarene Theological Seminary

Postmodern and Wesleyan? is an excellent resource for your small group or Sunday School class. The essays provide stimulating insights from the past and investigate possibilities for our tomorrows. Any class that enjoys meaningful conversation will find a broad range of perspectives on why we live as we do and how we can adapt to a rapidly changing world. The probing questions at the end of each chapter will penetrate your assumptions and engage your class in life-shaping discussions. --Woodie Stevens, SDMI Director, Church of the Nazarene

About the Author

Thomas Jay Oord, Ph.D., has earned degrees in religion and philosophy from Northwest Nazarene University, Nazarene Theological Seminary, and Claremont Graduate University, as well as having pursued post-doctoral work at Harvard Divinity School. Oord serves on the executive council of the Wesleyan Theological Society and has served as President of the Wesleyan Philosophical Society. Oord is an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene. After teaching philosophy three years at Eastern Nazarene College, Oord currently teaches theology and philosophy at Northwest Nazarene University. Jay Richard Akkerman is professor of pastoral theology and director of graduate theological online education programs at Northwest Nazarene University. He has more than 25 years of ministry experience in pastoring and teaching. Dr. Akkerman was a contributor for the book Postmodern and Wesleyan? Exploring the Boundaries and Possibilities. He and his wife, Kim have three daughters.

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By CH on September 27, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First let me say that this book contained very, very relevent thoughts. With that in tact, some of the articles needed more thought and did not consider the full theological implications of their conculusions. The book was easy to read and very "postmodern", no chapter was more than four pages long! Overall I would strongly recommend this book for an overview but would caution you to think through each of the conculusions, especially those refecting on truth and Biblical truth.

Good read!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Vic Reasoner on January 16, 2013
Format: Paperback
While this book hammers home the point that we need change, not all change is progress. The postmodern thought which is introduced in this compilation sounds suspiciously similar to the old modernism. The major difference is reflected by the question mark in the title. While modernism had faith in their superior scholarship, postmodernism cannot be sure of anything.

It is claimed on the first page that consensus over which books should be included in our Bible emerged only after councils, arguments, and shouting matches. The truth is that the authority of most books was immediately recognized because they were written by prophets and apostles. Certainly Peter acknowledged that what Paul wrote was Scripture (2 Peter 3:15-16). The early councils did not define Scripture, they defended Scripture. Of course if Peter did not write those words and if Paul did not write the Pastoral Epistles, then all we have are forgeries and only the higher critic knows for sure what part is God's Word.

While this book advocates a "big tent," meaning that we should be open-minded enough to allow disagreement on nonessentials, apparently we disagree over what is essential or how big the tent should be. According to this book "most Wesleyan statements of faith shy away from articulating a strict inerrancy view of the Bible. Viewing the Bible as infallible on matters of salvation rather than inerrant on all matters allows a 'big tent' for discussion and reflection to occur" [p. 25]. But things went down hill rapidly when Eve allowed the serpent under her tent. He not only questioned God's Word, but she followed suit by adding to it, and he followed up by denying it. The result was that once sin got its nose in the tent we have lived in a big tent full of sin ever since.
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7 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Seeking Disciple VINE VOICE on November 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
I am all for change in the Church. I don't believe that the Church is meant to simply be an organization and not the Bride of Christ, His living organism as He moves through His people by His Spirit and through His Word (1 Corinthians 12:27-31; Ephesians 4:11-16). Yet I believe that the way to transformation in the Church is not found in the broken words of postmodernism or any other human traditions. I believe the answer for true, radical, and lasting transformation is found in the preaching and teaching of the Bible to the people of God in truth.

Therefore, based on my views I knew that I would not enjoy reading another postmodern view of the Church but I was intrigued since the writers were appealing to Wesleyan tradition and though I am not a Nazarene or Wesleyan, I am Arminian and I do agree with much of what Wesley wrote and lived for. I was wondering what emergents would have to say to conservative Arminians. Yet once again I was disappointed by the direction that this book believes the Church should take.

As typical with emergent books, the book attacks the organizational church but instead of correcting the modern church through the Scriptures, the writers believe that the Church should avoid the Scriptures. No doubt the writers believe the Bible has its place but they believe that since truth is not knowable, we should not defend the inerrancy of the Bible or try to hold to a literal six-day creation as found in Genesis 1-2. The writers believe that the main problem with the Church is that we have come to "worship" the Bible instead of being a loving community. Perhaps but I found their arguments weak for casting aside the Bible in favor of postmodernism or infallible science.

Overall this was simply another typical emergent work. Nothing new.
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