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Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (Post-Contemporary Interventions) Paperback


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Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (Post-Contemporary Interventions) + The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge (Theory and History of Literature, Volume 10) + Simulacra and Simulation (The Body, In Theory: Histories of Cultural Materialism)
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Product Details

  • Series: Post-Contemporary Interventions
  • Paperback: 461 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books; Reprint edition (November 15, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8190340328
  • ISBN-13: 978-8190340328
  • ASIN: 0822310902
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.1 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,161 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Fredric Jameson, internationally recognized as a literary theorist and as America’s most notable Marxist intellectual, has established a leading place in discussions of postmodernism. Jameson brings to the subject an immense range of reference both to artworks and to theoretical discussions; a strong hypothesis linking cultural changes to changes in the place of culture within the whole structure of life produced by a new phase of economic history (multinational capitalism); and a severely scholarly wish to analyze and understand, rather than praise or blame, the object of his study.”—Jonathan Arac

About the Author

Fredric Jameson is Professor and Chair of the Literature Program at Duke University. He is the coeditor, with Masao Miyoshi, of The Cultures of Globalization, also published by Duke University Press.


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Customer Reviews

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It should be so actively read that I can even recommend it to those who would like to lose weight.
Umit Yamanturk
For example, he does not explicitly give much attention or interest to social theories such as poststructuralism, which is highly associated with postmodernism.
Mete Çomoðlu
Jameson seems to structure his sentences for the sheer purpose of amazing readers by their spectacular length.
The Troll Under the Bridge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

163 of 174 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 2, 1997
Format: Paperback
"Postmodernism" is one of those words many of us have heard somewhere, but something we know little about, which includes myself. But since I have read Jameson's book, among a few others on this notoriously confusing topic, let me at least tell you what I think about the book. To begin with, this is not a book for those who are new to the subject. This has to do not just with the extremely complicated nature of postmodernism as a topic, but Jameson's style of writing itself, which produces sentences that at times can run more than half a page, if not more. Reading Jameson's work can be something like climbing Everest with a jeep on your back, as a friend of mine recently commented. It is difficult to imagine an intellectual (perhaps with the exception of the psychoanalytic theorist Jacques Lacan) in the past thirty years who is more difficult to understand than Jameson.
Yet, those who are able to endure Jameson's arrogant, intricate writing style will easily see why his book on postmodernism is one of the best written on the subject. Jameson begins his work with an intricate reading of a painting by Van Gogh and contrasts it to Warhol's "Diamond Dust Shoes," the former as the symptom of a typical "modernist" work and the latter as a prime example of a "postmodernist" one. His main argument in the important opening title essay and throughout the book is that around the late sixties to the early seventies, cultural representation and production has experienced significant changes and that these changes must be accounted by even more significant changes in history itself, history being understood here with the Marxian notion of "the mode of production" or, to put it crudely, the socio-economic system.
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111 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Mete Çomoðlu on December 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
The term, Postmodernism refers to the cultural and ideological configuration that is taken to have replaced or be replacing Modernity. New movements in architecture and the arts as well as social theories indicate a change from modernity to postmodernity.
Frederic Jameson, an American Marxist social theorist and the author of the book, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, draws the attentions to the differences in culture between the modern and postmodern periods. In order to explain his arguments, Jameson is specially interested in the fields of architecture, art and other cultural forms. He places the heaviest emphasis on architecture. In his article, Jameson's basic argument is that postmodernism is a dominant cultural form and that is indicative of late capitalism.
Jameson's article begins with the comparison of Van Gogh's painting to Warhol's. Jameson contrasts Van Gogh's painting with Warhol's "Diamond Dust Shoes," He refers to the former as the symptom of a typical "modernist" work and the latter as a prime example of a "postmodernist" one. His main assertion here is that cultures and production has experienced important changes and these changes must be accounted by even more significant changes in history . He focuses on these changes on the individual level in postmodern society and his main concern was the cultural expressions and aesthetics that is associated with the different systems of production.
Jameson suggests that postmodernism is differed from other cultural forms by its emphasis on fragmentation. He specially emphasizes on the term, fragmentation. For Jameson, the fragmentation of the subject replaces the alienation of the subject which characterized modernism. Postmodernism always deals with surface, not substance.
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37 of 45 people found the following review helpful By John David Ebert on February 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
Postmodernism is not so much characterized by fragmentation--that was already a characteristic of Modernism, especially in Cubist painting and in poetry like T.S. Eliot's or Ezra Pound's--as by a hostility toward historical metanarratives,or "master narratives," as they are also dismissively called in order to evoke a colonialist slant. That Hegel and Marx, two of postmodernism's theoretical godfathers, were precisely that, i.e. creators of historical metanarratives, is generally quietly overlooked.

Fredric Jameson's book is not designed for the general reader as an introduction to postmodernism, but rather as an overview of postmodernism for the literate and intelligent reader who is already familiar with some of its basic tenets. It is very well written, and the comments from reviewers on this page regarding Jameson's unreadability are simply wrong. Jameson is lucid, clear and distinct. Descartes would have liked him.

Jameson points out that Postmodernism, by contrast with Modernism, has a certain depthlessness about it, and in this respect he is quite right. Jameson contrasts the depth and concern with such issues as anxiety and Existenz evident in thinkers like Heidegger and in painters like Munch with the shallowness of Andy Warhol or the fascination with simulacra of Baudrillard. This seems to me to be one of its decisive characteristics, as is also its mixing of Top and Pop. Whereas Modernist theoreticians like Adorno and Spengler were dismissive and scornful of the so-called "Culture Industry," in Postmodernism, the boundaries between popular culture and elite culture are generally effaced. James Joyce, in Finnegans Wake, THE apotheosis of Modernist literature, was already looking ahead to Postmodernism with his "Here Comes Everybody!
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