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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Two-Disc Deluxe Widescreen Edition) (2005)

Eric Sykes , Timothy Spall , Mike Newell  |  PG-13 |  DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,381 customer reviews)

List Price: $30.98
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Frequently Bought Together

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Two-Disc Deluxe Widescreen Edition) + Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Widescreen Edition) + Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Widescreen Edition)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Eric Sykes, Timothy Spall, David Tennant, Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson
  • Directors: Mike Newell
  • Format: Full Screen, Widescreen, Dolby, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: March 7, 2006
  • Run Time: 157 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,381 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000E6EK3S
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,204 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Two-Disc Deluxe Widescreen Edition)" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Additional scenes
  • Conversations with the cast: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint
  • Preparing for the Yule Ball  
  • Reflections on the Fourth Film
  • Triwizard Tournament, Dragon Arena: Dragon Challenge, Harry vs. the Horntail:The First Task, Meet the Champions
  • Triwizard Tournament, Lake: Lake Challenge, In Too Deep: The Second Task
  • Triwizard Tournament, Maze: Maze Challenge, To the Graveyard and Back Challenge, The Maze: The Third Task, He Who Must Not Be Named
  • Theatrical trailer
  • DVD-ROM features:  EA Game Demo, Hogwarts Timeline, Web Interactivity
  • (c) 2006 Warner Bros. Ent.
  • Harry Potter Publishing Rights (c) J.K.R.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

The fourth entry in the Harry Potter saga could be retitled Fast Times at Hogwarts, where finding a date to the winter ball is nearly as terrifying as worrying about Lord Voldemort's return. Thus, the young wizards' entry into puberty (and discovery of the opposite sex) opens up a rich mining field to balance out the dark content in the fourth movie (and the stories are only going to get darker). Mike Newell (Four Weddings and a Funeral) handily takes the directing reins and eases his young cast through awkward growth spurts into true young actors. Harry (Daniel Radcliffe, more sure of himself) has his first girl crush on fellow student Cho Chang (Katie Leung), and has his first big fight with best bud Ron (Rupert Grint). Meanwhile, Ron's underlying romantic tension with Hermione (Emma Watson) comes to a head over the winter ball, and when she makes one of those girl-into-woman Cinderella entrances, the boys' reactions indicate they've all crossed a threshold.

But don't worry, there's plenty of wizardry and action in Goblet of Fire. When the deadly Triwizard Tournament is hosted by Hogwarts, Harry finds his name mysteriously submitted (and chosen) to compete against wizards from two neighboring academies, as well as another Hogwarts student. The competition scenes are magnificently shot, with much-improved CGI effects (particularly the underwater challenge). And the climactic confrontation with Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes, in a brilliant bit of casting) is the most thrilling yet. Goblet, the first installment to get a PG-13 rating, contains some violence as well as disturbing images for kids and some barely shrouded references at sexual awakening (Harry's bath scene in particular). The 2 1/2-hour film, lean considering it came from a 734-page book, trims out subplots about house-elves (they're not missed) and gives little screen time to the standard crew of the other Potter films, but adds in more of Britain's finest actors to the cast, such as Brendan Gleeson as Mad-Eye Moody and Miranda Richardson as Rita Skeeter. Michael Gambon, in his second round as Professor Dumbledore, still hasn't brought audiences around to his interpretation of the role he took over after Richard Harris died, but it's a small smudge in an otherwise spotless adaptation. --Ellen A. Kim

On the DVD
The highlight of the two-disc set is a half-hour conversation with actors Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint. They discuss their reactions to the film and other topics with British writer Richard Curtis . Then they answer questions from contest-winning fans, such as what are their favorite kids' books (Watson bypasses the obvious answer in favor of Roald Dahl and Philip Pullman) and what scenes are they looking forward to in upcoming films. More routine extras include the "Reflections on the Fourth Film" featurette (14 min.), though it has comments from some of the other young cast members, and "Preparing for the Yule Ball" (9 min.). The 10 minutes of additional scenes are mostly skulking and skullduggery, plus a long musical number from the ball. The remaining material is grouped along the lines of the Triwizard Tournament, with behind-the-scenes looks at each of the competitions (about 22 min. total), two longer featurettes on He Who Must Not Be Named (11 min.) and the workday of the other contestants (Robert Pattinson, Stanislav Ianevski, and Clémence Poésy, 13 min.), and four games, playable with the directional arrows on the remote control, that can be frustrating to figure out. --David Horiuchi

Product Description

When Harry Potter's name emerges from the Goblet of Fire, he becomes a competitor in a grueling battle for glory among three wizarding schools - the Triwizard Tournament. But since Harry never submitted his name for the Tournament, who did? Now Harry must confront a deadly dragon, fierce water demons and an enchanted maze only to find himself in the cruel grasp of He Who Must Not Be Named. In this fourth film adaptation of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, everything changes as Harry, Ron and Hermione leave childhood forever and take on challenges greater than anything they could have imagined.

DVD Features:
DVD ROM Features
Featurette
Interviews
Theatrical Trailer


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fire in the Belly December 7, 2005
Go through the soundtrack listing before reading this review, because the former spoils everything there is to spoil.

While not necessarily the most vital feature of the `Harry Potter' films, one of the most important considerations is perhaps the feel of each movie, which is one of the most immediate things that strikes an audience.

In terms of that, as the series progresses, each part has become sturdier in achieving an all-round sense of completeness, in that every instalment gradually moves towards being a singular film in its own right while taking rich pickings from a world, whose continuity and consistency have been respected and admirably maintained, reconceived for the silver screen in what will ultimately be seven parts.

The first movie was atmospherically very lush, with rich hues of red and gold that both conveyed the wondrous regality of Hogwarts and gave the film an aptly warm, seasonal touch that maintained a sense of comfort in the world our young protagonists found themselves in as well as for the young audience, and, of course, mirrored the cheery Christmas movie-going period. The second saw a darkening that was tentative at best, giving it a more grimy, dull and sapped feel rather than a truly menacing or ominous one. The Gothic turn in the third demonstrated what that darkening should have accomplished, in addition to matching the mood of the third book, which, strange as it may sound, lent itself to the colour purple. `Goblet of Fire' then suitably attains a lovely palette that might have been filtered through a window in spring, bringing about a tightly textured look that doesn't suffer from an effluvium of colour, ranging from the autumnal compound of the castle to the shadowy blue of a graveyard.
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158 of 187 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars How is the an ultimate edition if NO EXTENDED version?!? September 7, 2010
By klovess
Format:Blu-ray
Like many of you who purchased the first two ultimate editions at a pretty penny, i was expecting extended editions of movies 3 and 4. What a disappointment! Were the big wigs at WB thinking that their fans would triple dip editions when they bring out all films in one super ultimate collection? I already owned all of the HP on Blu, but sold them when i started buying the Ultimate editions. I will NOT be purchasing 3 and 4. Very poor on WB's part to say its ultimate, and include 8 hours of bonus materials, but not the few extra scenes that regularly show on TV. Very poor indeed.
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119 of 140 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars No extended editions - a waste of money July 21, 2010
By Mike H
Format:DVD
Unlike the first two potter films released in "Ultimate Edition" form, the second two versions do not include their extended editions. This might not be a legitimate complaint if these versions of the films didn't already exist. In the US, they are aired quite regularly on ABC Family, and are quite good.

These extended editions of the film make the price point of the first two versions palatable, but their absence makes you wonder what exactly you're paying for with both this and the ultimate edition of PoA.
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ultimate Edition ?!?!?!?!? November 7, 2010
Format:Blu-ray
No extended cut, no 6.1 audio, no point ! Nothing "Ultimate" here. Way to drop the ball Warner Bros.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
There is so much good to say about this movie, but I'll start by answering the major criticisms of the detractors. Many are complaining that much from the book is left out. This is a valid point, and viewers who have read the book no doubt notice that the story skips about. I imagine if you haven't read the book, the story comes off as much more cohesive...you don't know what's missing. However, it is important to note that as in Lord of The Rings, the filmmaker is attempting to adapt a large and reasonably complex book into a film of 2.5 hours. In fact, this Potter book is far longer than any single Lord of the Rings installment. Things ARE going to be left out....thus, for fans of the books, it is more important to look at whether the overall portrait that the movie paints is both loyal and beautiful...Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is very true to its characters and captures the beauty of Hogwarts' magic to a degree that surpasses anything in the earlier movies. Detailed breakdown as follows:

Cinematography:

One of the things that impressed me most about Prisoner of Azkaban (Potter 3) was the beauty of the set piece scenes. No one could deny that Harry's ride on the hippogriff was beautifully shot. In addition, the color palette as a whole seemed many shades darker than the first two movies. The overal effect was that the movie felt more targeted towards adults. Goblet of Fire continues this trend. All of the major scenes have truly beautiful scenery buttressed by some impressive CGI. The whole movie felt like one set of wonders followed by another...I simply smiled at the beauty of much of it.
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44 of 52 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
****SPOILER ALERT****

Okay...the GoF book is 734 pages, and the movie adaptation is a little over 2.5 hours. Of course a lot of stuff was going to be cut. Some of the cuts I was able to deal with (e.g., Hermione and S.P.E.W.). Unfortunately, many of the characters (especially the other Triwizard champions) were severely underdeveloped as a result.

Giving Viktor Krum only two lines in the entire movie was inexcusable. So was cutting out the entire Quidditch World Cup match. The viewer isn't given enough reason to care about Krum, or why he became a potential love interest for Hermione. He simply comes across as a dumb jock. The movie should have shown a couple minutes of the World Cup match to show off his prowess, and little scene here and there of him interacting with Hermione (I was actually quite peeved that the didn't show her teaching Viktor how to pronounce her name).

The other champions were likewise poorly developed. You learn practically nothing about Cedric or Fleur Delacour (who got the least screentime out of the four champions). Fleur was simply another pretty face; they even cut the part about her being a quarter-veela (which was why the boys were swooning over her in the book). And if I didn't read the book, I probably wouldn't have cared too much about Cedric's death near the end of the movie.

Even Ron and Hermione were mainly relegated to the background. They didn't even use any kind of magic for the entire film! It would've been nice to show how exactly Hermione was helping Harry (like with the Accio spell), instead of just having her simper and worry. Ron seemed to be purely comic relief.

My other quibble was that the first task was WAY too long. The dragon chasing Harry around Hogwarts was ridiculous.
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Scenes in Theater release missin from DVD?
That scene was in the DVD, I only saw the DVD version, and I remember that scene... it WAS very funny.
Mar 28, 2006 by Carrie |  See all 3 posts
Harry Potter Ultimate Editions
Looks like both will be released on October 19th - http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=4861. I have the first two of these and will definitely get these next two as well.
Jul 12, 2010 by M. Roxwell |  See all 4 posts
Should Harry Potter 4&5 be rated PG instead of PG-13?
The PG-13 is fair for GoF OotP though should have been PG
Sep 26, 2013 by Michael Sloane,Tempe,Arizona,United States... |  See all 3 posts
Extended Versions
I am also searching for the Director's cut versions or extended versions. I feel sure some exist because Dish Network played on some time back and I know I saw scenes I have not seen before. As a rookie Amazon.com shopper, where does one go to located Director's or Extended versions?
Apr 30, 2007 by Sheri L. Skains |  See all 5 posts
Chinese Substitle
Yes, there are Chinese subtitles
Aug 17, 2008 by Kami Amaya |  See all 4 posts
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