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  • Powell: Duplicates - A Concerto for Two Pianos/Setting for Two Pianos/Modules - An Intermezzo for Chamber Orchestra
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Powell: Duplicates - A Concerto for Two Pianos/Setting for Two Pianos/Modules - An Intermezzo for Chamber Orchestra Import


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Audio CD, Import, November 8, 1993
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$43.44 $18.80

Product Details

  • Performer: Alan Feinberg, Robert Taub
  • Orchestra: Los Angeles Philharmonic
  • Conductor: David Alan Miller
  • Composer: Mel Powell
  • Audio CD (November 8, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Harmonia Mundi
  • ASIN: B0000007DV
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #417,972 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Duplicates, concerto for 2 pianos: A Concerto For Two Pianos
2. Duplicates, concerto for 2 pianos: A Concerto For Two Pianos
3. Duplicates, concerto for 2 pianos: A Concerto For Two Pianos
4. Setting for 2 pianos
5. Modules, intermezzo for chamber orchestra

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Scriabinmahler on June 7, 2011
Format: Audio CD
The booklet says Mel Powell's 'Duplicates' is his largest and monumental work, which won 1990 Pulitzer Price for Music and marked new beginning for the composer. The music sounds like an eclectic mixture of Messiaen, Boulez and Schoenberg with a touch of Jazz and is a highly original and evocative work that gripps listeners' attention from the beginning to the end like an epic journey through a kaleidoscope of shifting moods, colours, darkness and light, occasionally accompanied by catastrophic explosions. The both pianists are outstanding technically and artistically, and the recording quality counld not be better. 'Setting' for Two Pianos (played by different pianists) and 'Modules' for Chamber Orchestra make for equally impressive listening experiences.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G-Man on November 12, 2010
Format: Audio CD
This was an enigma. Like Don Martino, jazz man goes serialist serious academic. For many years listens it's logic seemed more random than most 20th C. material. Yet it was pretty, like watching the stars at night really reflecting different strengths of light back, not boring, so I kept assuming the old serialist architecture might somehow justify this as more than mere random cloud watching and eventually deliver a more cohesive whole.

Recently I was in the right mood, and I saw it there, like a layered abstract painting, I heard it so as to understand the meaning of the name "Duplicates". It's a subtle impressionism, but it has force, gusto.

Sensuous, a bit in the later-Boulez lushness, but unlike Boulez, the ascetic 20th C dissonance is included, so the music does not hang prettily in space, but rather clashes and splashes, chemicals thrown together for moderate fireworks FORCE, the sub-Varesian forces that compromise, creating drama, event and flow, rather than too much bombast.

The other works are a bit like remixes, both carrying the same sound and momentum.

The whole thing is tonal enough for regular harmony if there's a group listening, starry enough to be spacey and ambient even, yet it's more that the harmonies and dissonances catch the light. It sounds like it belongs within the bounds of the "beautiful" natural world in other words.

There are some crystals in the mine. Immersion is possible. It hasn't dated and doesn't sound anything like academic music from rigid dry serialists or neo-classicists.

(Bonus: crystaline, convincing conversation ammo evidence that Philip Glass was the wrong direction for western music, not crystaline, just see-through.)
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