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Power: A Novel (Norton Paperback Fiction) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Norton Paperback Fiction
  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393319687
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393319682
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #238,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In this coming-of-age story, a 16-year-old Native American girl named Omishito (a Tiaga name meaning One Who Watches) inadvertently witnesses the hunting and killing of her clan's sacred animal, the Florida panther. What makes this especially troubling and complicated for Omishito is that her beloved spiritual mentor, Ama, is the panther's murderer. At first, Omishito cannot fathom why Ama, a tribal elder who still practices the old powers, would commit this sacrilege and risk the wrath of her tribe and country. (Unlike the Tiaga tribe, the Florida panther is considered endangered and therefore federally protected.) Through seamless storytelling and expert scene building, Linda Hogan reveals the many-layered mysteries inherent in this novel (based on a true story) as well as the powerful forces that endanger Native Americans and the survival of their spirituality. --Gail Hudson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Sixteen-year-old Omishita Eaton and her adoptive Aunt Ama, the main characters of Chickasaw Indian Hogan's (Solar Storms) thought-provoking new bildungsroman, are members of the fictional Taiga tribe of Florida, a dwindling group down to its last 30 members. After a devastating hurricane, Ama and the girl track a wounded deer into the swamps, using it as a stalking horse to hunt a panther, an animal sacred to the Taiga. Ama kills the cat, a scrawny, flea-bitten example of its species, and is charged with poaching and violations of the Endangered Species Act. The event tears the Taiga community apart. Most castigate her for slaying the sacred animal, but Omishita stands by her. Though Ama's motives are never made entirely clear, there are intimations that she undertook the taboo act in the hope of sparking a regeneration not only of the Taiga culture but of all Creation itself. Hogan is known principally as a poet, and the current work reflects that vocation in her lyrical, almost mystical use of language. The novel is about two different ways of knowing the world and the problems that ensue when these ways come into conflict. Though slow at times, this is nonetheless a novel of gentle rewards.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

A Chickasaw pony lives with me. We are sisters. I love to write poetry, essays, and novels, and also the magical experience of teaching others to do the same. My work is strong on environment and traditional ecosystem knowledge. As a Native woman writer, I am fortunate enough to have had funding from The Lannan Foundation, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and was one of three finalists for a Pulitzer when John Updike received it. It was my first novel, MEAN SPIRIT. My other books have all received awards or nominations. PEOPLE OF THE WHALE is most popular in Taiwan, POWER is for adult and younger audiences, as well. SOLAR STORMS included both the James Bay HydroQuebec project and the subject of adoption in Indian communities. Traveling the world comes with this unexpected life as a writer, from a childhood of depression which lacked privilege enough to go to school. I did, however, become a Professor in Creative Writing and Native Studies. I am now giving readings, lectures, workshops writing a new novel, and loving the unique Chickasaw pony, rare in this world as beautiful poetry. I worked for the Chickasaw Nation, my own people, writing a booklet on our maps, two performance pieces, visiting and teaching classes, doing historical research and seeing our ancient bodies returned to this earth i love and about which I write.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Sydow (wsydow@aspensys.com) on December 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
In this story, there is a storm, a panther is killed, and there are two trials--one in a courthouse about the death of an animal protected by the Endangered Species Act and one among the Taiga elders, who abide by the old ways, on whether the killing was conducted in accordance with tribal law. We experience these events through the eyes, ears, body, and mind of 16 yr old Omishto as she accompanies her adult friend and "teacher," Ama, on a journey she knows is wrong but inevitable, experiences the chasm between the old and new ways of living for the Taiga people, and seeks to understand her own place in a chaotic and dying world. Linda Hogan's masterful writing led me to read this book with my heart, not my mind. This story is an exquisite masterpiece.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 9, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Of all Linda Hogan's three novels, this is her finest, with a mesmerizing lyrical voice, a young Native American narrator who is coming of age in a time when tribal and environmental law are in conflict. This story of Omishto, the One Who Watches, the endangered Florida panther, a hurricane which reveals family and tribal truths -- is elegantly told and a real page-turner. The courtroom drama at the center of the book, is more fascinating than that of Snow Falling on Cedars (David Guterson's recent bestseller). And I found the descriptions of place, people, and Native American vision and a rebirth of a culture of both panther and tribe to be deeply inspiring. This is one of my all-time favorite novels, and I bet it will be a classic.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Franklin O. Pratt on June 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Ms. Hogan has woven a tale that is a tapestry both complex and deceptively simple in focus. For many, this story could be told with other than Native symbology, from the point of view of living honestly and the struggles within the lives we inhabit, be it home, work, family, neighborhood, or, most importantly, self. She illustrates with reverance how deeply connected we are to all of creation and how, when we seek meaning in our lives in indifference to all of creation, how separate and fearful our beliefs can become. This is carefully illustrated by Ms. Hogan through the duplicitous nature of many of the characters (not unlike any of us) interacting with the young woman of this story. The fear Ms. Hogan exposes throughout the telling of this story is that which is held in many hearts when confronted with how we have moved from living with respect for life to the group-held belief and reality that being human is separate and above the rest of creation. This book tells of old ways which compel a young woman to herself, which is, in my view, both particular to this story and potentially to any reader that "sees" similar to that of the young Native woman whose story this book reveals. Ms. Hogan speaks of that which is authentic, sacred, and true. The book has much to say, but it also draws the landscape of the Florida swamps with its heat and searing presence indelibly in the readers mind. The book confirms the truth of life as an immutable force larger than any of our efforts to ignore it. I am grateful to have read her work.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kaya McLaren on August 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
Hogan's voice is unique, poetic, fluid, and very rooted in nature. In both POWER and SOLAR STORMS, she explores the complexity of relationships with our own culture, the natural world, and the spirit world, creating rich and multi-dimensional stories. Both of these books have been beautiful experiences for me that leave me wanting to share them with everyone. All my friends will be receiving POWER for their birthday this year.
Kaya McLaren, author of CHURCH OF THE DOG, ON THE DIVINITY OF SECOND CHANCES, and HOW I CAME TO SPARKLE AGAIN
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Johnson on January 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
One of the best stories I've ever read, told in gripping first-person narrative by teenager Omishto, a smart but isolated young woman caught between two worlds: modern, westernized America and the ancient Taiga Indian swamps. I never before understood the beauty of Florida wetlands until Ms. Hogan put pen to paper. When Omishto is caught in a hurricane, the description is so vivid you can feel the wind and water against your skin....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chester Corpt on April 30, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Linda Hogan is a strong, imaginative writer who captures the voice of a young girl on the borderland of two Americas, white and Indian.
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