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Power Transitions: Strategies For the 21st Century Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1889119434 ISBN-10: 1889119431 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Seven Bridges Press, LLC / Chatham House; 1st edition (January 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1889119431
  • ISBN-13: 978-1889119434
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #592,349 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The AuthorsRonald L. Tammen is Chair of the Department of National Strategy and Professor of National Strategy at the National War College in Washington D.C. Jacek Kugler is the Elisabeth Helms Rosecrans Professor of International Relations at the School of Politics and Economics, Claremont Graduate University. Douglas Lemke is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Michigan. Allan C. Stam III is an assistant professor of political science at Yale University. Mark Andrew Abdollahian is Vice President of Decision Insights, Inc., a New York consulting firm that forecasts political and economic events. Carole Alsharabati is an assistant professor at the Balamand University Business School and on the Faculty of Law and Political Science of the University Saint Joseph in Beirut, Lebanon. Brian Efird is an Associate at Decision Insights, Inc. in New York. A.F.K. Organski was Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and a cofounder of Decision Insights Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John Thomas on April 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
What is the current threat to world peace? What will the post Cold War-system look like in the 21st century? Who will follow the United States as the next world power? Power Transitions answers these provocative questions revolutionizing academic analysis and merging it with hands on policy. This book is a must-not only for graduate and undergraduate students in political science-it is an academic book that is approachable for everyone (especially international business executives) who wants to understand the current state of the world. Power Transitions intriguingly predicts China's rise to world dominance in carefully documented terms. India is predicted to be the power to dominate China. These statements are not alarmist statements, but scientifically derived predictions of prestigious academics, providing practical political solutions for these potentially dire events. The Department Chair of the National War College, Ronald Tammen, joined forces with Jacek Kugler, a distinguished professor from Claremont Graduate University, Alan Stam from Yale, and a hand-full of brilliant young analysts from various institutions to compile a new theory and a new perspective for a new age.
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By LoganNats on May 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book to write a paper on Power Transition Theory, and it turned out to have all the information I could possibly have needed! It is very easy to read; the authors explain everything clearly and concisely. I would definitely recommend this for both teachers, students, and people who just want to acquire knowledge.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book a while ago while I was in Prof Tammen's Power Transitions course at Portland State University. I personally think that the theory is for the most part sound but the most important thing that can be derived from the book is a WORKING model or framework that can enable political leaders a rational method to make sound policy choices.
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3 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mariusz Ozminkowski on October 30, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The problem with the Power Transition Theory (and many other similar theories) is that it attempts to provide an all-encompassing explanation of wars and conflicts. The theory is very elegant and interesting, but cannot reach beyond general statements that are of very little explanatory value. For example, the claim that a state will challenge the dominant power when it reaches parity or overtakes that power is very trivial. Anyone even remotely familiar with world history would agree that probably that is a necessary condition (though there are certainly many exceptions) for a war between world powers or between any other pair or group of competing states. If that can be supported by additional studies, that's nice, but we still don't go beyond generalities.
And yet, the authors continue forwarding such claims as: "the conflict between Iran and Iraq was the result of Iraq's overtaking of Iran in the wake of the 1980 collapse of the Iranian political regime." They should know better and recognize that even if the so-called 'overtaking' played a role in the Iraq's attack on Iran, this was just a matter of timing in taking advantage of the presumed Iran's weakness, but it was not the real cause of the conflict. Further, concluding from the actual strength of the two states and the poor performance of Iraq in the war one would even question if there was 'overtaking' in the first place. The authors engage here in a circular reasoning: 'Overtaking' occurred because Iraq attacked Iran; Iraq attacked Iran because 'overtaking' occurred. As many theories of this kind, Power Transition theory struggles with a serious dilemma. In its general form it cannot really explain anything, but the soonest it goes beyond the generalities, it encounters a whole gamut of explanations that deem the theory irrelevant.
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