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1
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I'm not pissed. I'm sure it was an automatic thing. Probably after 30 days, they assume its a failed backorder, and cancel our orders assuming the manufacturer isn't delivering. Its still pretty stupid and lazy on the part of Amazon to cancel all our orders on a product thats just late. Putting us all at the back of the line, and even worse, not accepting more pre-orders. But, I'm telling you, go to Bing. Do a search on Adorama Lowpro. Then select the cash back link next to Adorama, for 11%. Then shop, and buy the S10 (on pre-order for $429). You may need to(as I did) create a .live account. I'm getting back $45. Bye Amazon. Thanks for canceling my order. :)
Sep 20, 2009 by J. Caputo
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I sent an email to Canon asking about the release date, and on 9/24/09 they responded that they did not know for sure but that they expected the cameras to ship within "the next week or so."
Sep 29, 2009 by M. Rohlman
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The manual doesn't specifically give requirements so I tested my S90 with an 8GB Sandisk Extreme (30MB/s*), an older 4GB Sandisk Extreme III (20MB/s*), an older model 4GB Sandisk Ultra II (15MB/s*) and a really old 2GB Sandisk Blue card. I set the camera to record JPG+RAW and set it for continuous shooting. I held the button down for 60 seconds and got the same results for the first 3 cards at 47 exposures in 60 seconds and 25 exposures for the Sandisk Blue. At 11.4 MB per shot, the camera was packing down files at approximately 9MB/second which is well below what the first three are capable of providing. Shooting simple jpegs or video will require even lower speeds. (*The speeds shown are manufacturer's stated values) In static testing, I have found that the write speed of my Ultra II card is up to 18.2 MB/s while the considerably more expensive Sandisk Extreme card is only slightly better at 19.3 MB/s, which may of course be the speed limitation of my Sandisk card reader. (Speeds may also vary between card production runs.) Does this answer your question however? Not really. The first 3 cards noted above are indicated as class 10, 6, and 2** respectively. But as Sandisk cards generally run well above their class ratings, this doesn't tell you what speed a generic class 10, 6, or 2 card will provide. Speeds may vary significantly in a specific class based on the quality of the card. If you stick with a good quality card though anything class 4 or above should be fine. A Sandisk Ultra 4GB Class 4 card can be obtained for less than $15 through Amazon from Beach Camera who is an authorized sandisk dealer. (Beware of unauthorized dealers as I have received a bogus item from one of the more prominent ones that sells here on Amazon.) (**Please note that my older model Ultra II card referenced above was shown as a class 2 while the current Sandisk Ultra models are listed as a class 4 even though the stated 15MB/s has not changed.)
Jul 11, 2010 by J. Robertson
0
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SD series is more for the "point and shoot" crowd whereas the Sxx series offers more exposure adjustability for better creative control. The Sxx series also generally has larger image sensors which creates more interpixel spacing which reduces light bleeding between pixels thus reducing noise. (The "larger" reference is in reference to physical size of the sensor not pixel count.) As for whether the S90 takes better/clearer pictures the answer is most likely yes but how much better is going to be based on the situation. In low light situations the answer is a definite yes as the S90 has an f2.0 aperature which allows twice as much light as the f2.8 of the SD1200. This combined with the larger sensor will allow the S90 to take better low light pictures. Some other differences favoring the S90 are the 28mm wide angle lens and flash range. The 28mm lens captures an image roughly 25% wider than the 35mm lens on the SD1200. Flash distance increases from 14 to 21 feet at wide angle setting. The downside of the S90 is size. It is considerably larger and heavier than the SD1200. As for the reddish tones, this is a function of Canon cameras. It can be minimized however through proper use of the white balance/lighting type settings in the camera. I hope this helps. (note: Sxx refers to the S10 through S90 series not the S100 through S500 series which were point and shoot models.)
Jun 30, 2010 by J. Robertson
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I've had the LX3 for about a year and I'm anxious to get rid of it. It's not very pocket friendly for one thing. And I still dislike the complex menu system. It obviously takes fantastic photos, but I don't know how to say this... It's just not "usable". I like to carry my camera around and take quick and spontaneous photos. And with the LX3, this is just not possible.. bulky size, manual lens cap, slow start-up, slow focusing, clunky menus, etc. Don't get me wrong. The LX3 is a fantastic camera. And it has more creative controls than the S90, but it just doesn't suit my shooting style. I'm planning to get the S90 as an everyday camera, and a Canon DSLR for more composed and serious photos. The LX3 will be going on Craigslist soon.
Mar 29, 2010 by !
0
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As other have found though the S90's f/2 is only at the widest setting and the G11 is brigher at full zoom and the zoom is longer. So there are a few tradeoffs with the lenses. I'm actually in the same boat I got the G11, but fell in love with the s90 so I got that as well to replace my SD20 pocket camera. Sorry I have not had them long enough or shot enough pictures to give any real comparison. Coming from the SD20 I have a lot of catching up to do on the cameras and the software. I will say I think the rear dial on the s90 and G11 are too easy to rotate, I like the rear dial on the Canon SLRs, these little ones feel cheap and really are not the break through they represented for the SLRs. The s90 control ring on the lens seems very nice, but if it was all metal it would feel much nicer; still that feature is going to work well. I already put an egrips pad on the front of the s90 and a couple other carefully placed so I can hold onto the camera. First pocket camera I've put the hand-strap on as well (very nice one is supplied with camera). They should have included a slim slip case for the camera. I agree the Articulating LCD is a very nice feature and one of the main reasons I'll hold onto the G11, I know the new screens are better but often I'm shooting blind with my SD20. Coming from SLRs still nothing beats a great view finder or angle finder, but the articulating LCD can be very very handy. Now I have two cameras to learn (well actually 3 I replaced my film SLR with a digital as well), it maybe the G11 won't get a lot of use as the s90 will almost certainly be my pocket camera. Still It will be nice to have and after learning to operate these new digitals it should not be to hard to switch between the s90 and the G11.
Nov 12, 2009 by ThroughTheLookingGlass
0
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For the most impartial reviews, I suggest http://www.dpreview.com/. This site offers balanced & thorough reviews. I am rather partial to Canon cameras but I have also come across several Kodaks that have had very good color. While the S90 is a very good camera for low light, the Canon SD4000 has also received high marks and might be a little more appropriate to your needs. But truly, it would be best to check dpreview.com and read through their reviews.
Aug 27, 2010 by J. Robertson
0
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Found exact fit with room for extra battery, sd card, has olympus label on front . Found at best buy labeled as black neoprene sport case item # 202320 for $12.99. Perfect case for camera
Oct 23, 2009 by Dr. Bob
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I'm using a class 4 8GB SDHC card (Sandisk Ultra II) with my Canon S90 camera. Haven't gotten any hiccups so far and it loads images plenty fast for me. Though there are some cameras out there that will want a minimum speed from SD cards. For instance, most dslr cameras will benefit from using class 6 (minimum write speed of 6MB/sec) SD cards because it can shoot multiple frames per second. Some go as high as 9fps. There aren't very many Point and Shoot cameras that support such a high frame rate so in short they can't benefit from the latest and greatest SDHC cards.
Feb 11, 2010 by Amazon Customer
0
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I have no experience with the Sony cameras, but I bought a Canon s90 in October 2009 and I love it. It has done everything I ask it to do, and more. Shutter lag is almost nonexistent... this camera is fast. I was surprised by that. The quality of the photos is great, and it takes excellent shots in low light. Sometimes I use the camera on Auto setting, and most pictures turn out perfect. It's a very smart camera. Sometimes I tweak the settings. This camera allows you to have full control of whatever you want whenever you are ready, or it will make all the decisions for you if you prefer. I am still learning all the features of this great camera. I am impressed by the quality and color of the images. The camera is smart enough to give me what I want. It's almost as though the s90 is psychic. It captures what I see. This is my first digital camera. I waited to buy one until Canon came out with this amazing little powerhouse. I had a hunch it would be the right one for me, and it is. It is easy to learn and use. Nothing else on the market right now can compare. I take it everywhere!
Mar 24, 2010 by Heirloom Tomato
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