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Practical Chin Na: A Detailed Analysis of the Art of Seizing and Locking Paperback – June, 1999

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Text: English (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Unique Pubns (June 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0865681759
  • ISBN-13: 978-0865681750
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 7.2 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,266,584 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy Lin on March 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book should be on the required reading list for all martial artists, regardless of style. In this fairly slender volume, Mr. Yun covers the majority of the biomechanical principles involved in the complex art of chin-na.
Like Sifu Park Bok Nam's excellent texts on Baguazhang, the idea is not to delineate technique but rather to expound on theory and principle - the fundamentals, so to speak, from which technique may be built.
For those of you who are looking for a library of chin-na techniques, this is not for you. This book teaches instead the basic principles behind chin-na. What may be derived from this book are not only chin-na techniques but also chin-na escapes and counters. Makes sense to me; if you really understand how something is done, then you also understand how it is undone.
This book is a wonderful read on its own, and it is an excellent companion to Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming's multiple compendiums on chin-na.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Hardman on December 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
Finally we are seeing a number of well-written martial arts books which deal with the technical aspects of a technique instead of just attempting to demonstrate what a technique looks like (i.e., "this is a front kick..."). Author Zhao Da Yuan, a student of Ba Gua great Li Zi Ming commences with detailed descriptions of how the human body is constructed, and how we move. These are the keys to understanding how Chin Na and virtually every other grappling form works. For the first time in a martial arts book, we have set before us a concrete treatis (rather than the oh-so-popular abstract theory, which conveniently does not require proof!) on patterns of siezing, locking, twisting...and the throws (and possible damage) which result.
Zhao Da Yuan discusses Basic Knowledge, Basic Principles, Basic Requirements of posture, Chin Na mechanics, a catalog of Chin Na hand techniques, Mechanics II, Rang of motion of the arms with specific techniques shown, and range of motion with the lower limbs demonstrated with specific techniques. For anyone who is on the path to becoming an accomplished body mechanic and wants to advance their understanding of how to apply pressure point and joint locking techniques, this study guide is a must. One of the most interesting points mentioned by the guide is the fact that virtually all styles of Chinese arts include Chin Na as an advanced study--from specific regional styles to Ba Gua. Chin Na is what is behind so many of the "flowery" looking kung fu techniques which grace many of our forms.
Another superb volume similar to this one in structure and explanation is written by the man who translated this book, Tim Cartmell.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Edd Hillman on November 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
How many martial arts styles teach you techniques without the principles? It is often the case that many styles leave the practitioner to understand the principles through techniques. This is a lengthy process and the conclusions the practitioner reaches are questionnable. This book teaches the principles primarily. It has a superb section on the anatomy and the physiological weaknesses inherent in the human body. It takes the reader through step by step, by principles, not techniques. It requires careful analysis and a great deal of thought from the reader, and thinking and developing oneself is the key to self-expression and understanding. The techniques shown are but examples based around principles, and as stated within the book have infinite combat applications and possibilities. Whether you are new to joint locking and seizing, or experienced, this book must be part of your martial library.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
The best book I've seen on chin na. It teaches you the principles behind chin na - physics, body mechanics, set ups, and practical training methods. You learn how the body moves and its limitations and how to apply proper leverage at the optimum angle and with the correct type of force. You come away with a foundation on which you can build technique and with the materials (50 basic techniques plus some additional ones) with which to begin construction. Unlike many martial arts books it does not throw a multitude of techniques at you and leave you struggling to understand how they work. Instead you will first learn to understand principles and then the operation of techniques will easily make sense because you understand the laws of physics and biomechanics that govern all joint locking techniques. Highest reccomendation for someone wanting to learn joint locking techniques.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an outstanding book on a difficult subject to write a book on. Chin na is a form of grappling, which in my opinion is more difficult to present in text and pictures than a book on a punching and kicking art. But this book does an excellent job of of presenting chin na in that format.

There are so many aspects of the book that I liked, but I'll just mention a few here. I liked the way the book was organized and structured, which was very logical, which helps you learn better. Chin na is a difficult art to organize sometimes, since there are so many and varied techniques, but fortunately it does break down more or less logically by areas of the body. The author breaks it down further by which way the joint is being moved and manipulated, which is helpful too.

The chapter on applied anatomy is the only one I've seen in a chin na book so far, and although most readers will find this a little dry, it's just something a more advanced student should know, and will help you take your technique to the next level, because if you don't understand how the joints work, you're just going through the moves and don't really understand the technique. So buckle down and wade through it. It's good for you. :-) Plus if you understand the joint capabilities and restrictions you can create your own locks--a point too often overlooked.

The author gives the original Chinese names of the moves, such as "Pine Tree Bends Down," and "The White Robe Cuts the Ground." Unfortunately these picturesque names aren't as helpful as the modern names, such as upper elbow wrap, or reverse wrist twist, which make more sense, but that's just the way it is.
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