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Practical Electronic Fault-Finding and Troubleshooting [Kindle Edition]

ROBIN PAIN
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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  • Print ISBN-10: 0750624612
  • Print ISBN-13: 978-0750624619
  • Edition: 1
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Book Description

It isn't enough to be able to design. It isn't even enough to be able to debug. To be a real fault finder, you must be able to get a feel for what is going on in the circuit you are examining. In this book Robin Pain explains the basic techniques needed to be fault finder.



Simple circuit examples are used to illustrate principles and concepts fundamental to the process of fault finding. This is not a book of theory. It is a book of practical tips, hints, and rules of thumb, all of which will equip the reader to tackle any job, whether it is fixing a TV, improving the sound from a hi-fi, or locating the fault in a piece of process equipment. You may be an engineer or technician in search of information and guidance, a college student, a hobbyist building a project from a magazine, or simply a keen self-taught amateur who is interested in electronic fault finding but finds books on the subject too mathematical or specialised. But you have one thing lacking, no fault-finding strategy. Seasoned
professional designers have that peculiar knowledge of their own work and specialised knowledge of its components to allow them to analyse and remove faults quickly on the spot (design errors take a little longer!). Fault finders can never have this depth of specialisation;
commercial pressures demand a minimum-knowledge-to-do-the-job approach. Practical Electronic Fault Finding and Troubleshooting describes the fundamental principles of analog and digital fault finding (although of course there is no such thing as a `digital fault' - all faults are by nature analog). This book is written entirely for a fault finder using only the basic fault-finding equipment: a digital multimeter and an oscilloscope. The treatment is non-mathematical (apart from Ohm's Law) and all jargon is strictly avoided. Robin Pain was originally trained to service colour TV, and has worked as an industrial fault finder for manufacturers of mobile radio, audio equipment, microcomputers and medical equipment. He has lectured at home and abroad on microcomputer fault finding.

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Robin Pain has st down in words (almost entirely free of maths) the experience of many years practical work on audio, radio, TV and computer equipment.'
Electronics Education, Spring 1997

From the Publisher

Simple circuit examples are used to illustrate principles and concepts fundamental to the process of fault finding. This is not a book of theory. It is a book of practical tips, hints, and rules of thumb, all of which will equip the reader to tackle any job, whether it is fixing a TV, improving the sound from a hi-fi, or locating the fault in a piece of process equipment. You may be an engineer or technician in search of information and guidance, a college student, a hobbyist building a project from a magazine, or simply a keen, self-taught amateur who is interested in electronic fault finding but finds books on the subject too mathematical or specialized. This book is written entirely for a fault finder using only the basic fault-finding equipment: a digital multimeter and an oscilloscope. The treatment is non-mathematical (apart from Ohm's Law) and all jargon is strictly avoided. Robin Pain was originally trained to service color TV, and has worked as an industrial fault finder for manufacturers of mobile radio, audio equipment, microcomputers and medical equipment. He has lectured at home and abroad on microcomputer fault finding.

Product Details

  • File Size: 3759 KB
  • Print Length: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Newnes; 1 edition (April 22, 1996)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001BXLZY0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,868,268 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but.... November 27, 2006
Format:Paperback
I have read and re-read this book and find it interesting but it lacks proper outlines and steps to follow. Shows some unique insights but doesn't give enough examples and step by step procedures to follow when troubleshooting. Overall it is a good book to have but I don't think it is worth the list price of $47.00 or even half that. I put the value around $14.00.
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