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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Condition: Used - Very Good. VG in flexicover Publisher: Hermes House. Publication Date: 2004. Edition: . Description: Delivered from the UK in 10-14 days. New edition, 2004. Previously published as 'The art of magic'. A bright, tidy copy in tight binding. This is a heavy book (about 1.5kg packed), & extra postage may be required
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The Practical Encyclopedia of Magic Paperback – 2004

4.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Hermes House (2004)
  • ASIN: B000MH8S9G
  • Product Dimensions: 11.6 x 9.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,322,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Purchased to replace my son's classroom library copy, when he accidentally set his backpack in some snow at the bus stop and ruined that one, we were surprised it now is so much smaller/more compact.

This latest edition is easily half the size of the one he borrowed, which was a few years old. Should have really paid attention to that in the description, as at first we weren't sure we had received the correct title. It turns out, after careful inspection and side-by-side comparison of both editions, to have the same content as the old edition, for the most part, with some tricks removed, while others have added to, revised or updated.

Great, clear photos and easy-to-read text, with excellent instructions on how to perform and perfect each trick.

Perfect for kids in Grades 4-6, and I'd also say for adults just starting to learn sleight of hand and beginner/easy to remember card tricks. Our son loved it; as soon as it was entered back into circulation, he borrowed it again and easily and quickly learned a few new tricks, with which he's already amazed our neighbors' younger kids.
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Format: Paperback
My eight year old son has been performing magic for about two years now and is a regular attender of several magic clubs and conventions. While he's learning a lot from other magicians, we really wanted him to encourage him to start learning by himself. The Practical Encyclopedia of Magic is a great fundamentals book for magicians. There is a good variety of tricks in here including tricks that are sold as singular boxed tricks in magic shops but performed with everyday items (example - "Hot Rod" using a butter knife and a paddle move), easy tricks for kids (such as linking two paper clips using a dollar), and tricks that even seasoned professionals utilize (double lifts, biddle lifts, palming coins, etc). There's a good variety of tricks in here for magicians of all levels.

Asides from magic tricks, this book also includes a small section on the history of magic, information regarding misdirection, practice, patter and style, and explanations about the difference between comedy, close up, television, and stage magicians. The book is separated into these main categories of magic:

Card Magic - This takes up a majority of the book.
Dinner Table Magic - Tricks you can do with everyday items found on a dinner table.
Match Magic - Tricks involving matches and match books.
String Cord and Rope Magic - Tricks including rubber bands ropes and cords.
Mind Magic - Not so much mentalism as it is predictions.
Silk, Thimble, and Paper magic - Even includes a version of a snowstorm!
Money Magic - This includes tricks like linking paper clips and lots of coin magic including French drops, coin rolling, etc.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a birthday gift or our seven year old grandson. He had found a copy at his local library and didn't want to return it. Now he has his own copy and entertains his grandmother and I with new tricks every time we see him.
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Format: Paperback
When I purchased this magic book, I was led to believe from a convincing review that this book would do for the present generation of magical newbies what Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic (1975) did for the previous generation and The Amateur Magician's Handbook (1950) by Henry Hay did for the generation before that.

Ere dealing with Einhorn's book in particular, let's compare it with the books by Wilson and Hay. (1) Wilson's book rates 5 Stars at Amazon and 4.31 Stars at LibraryThing. He teaches more than 300 tricks in 472 pages. His tricks range from close-up magic to big stage illusions. His book is profusely illustrated with line drawings. There is a detailed table of contents, but no index, no glossary, and no bibliography. (2) Hay's book rates 5 Stars at Amazon and 4.71 Stars at LibraryThing. He teaches more than 300 tricks in 331 pages. His tricks range from hand magic to platform magic with apparatus. His book is sparsely illustrated with black and white photographs. The table of contents is topical only, but there is an informative glossary followed by an extensive bibliography and index. (3) Einhorn's book rates 5 Stars at Amazon and 4.5 Stars at LibraryThing. He teaches 120 tricks in 256 pages. His tricks can be done without gimmicks or fakes using items that can be carried in your pocket or that you have at hand. His book is beautifully illustrated with 1,000 full color photographs. There is a detailed table of contents in front and a detailed index in back, along with a brief glossary and a helpful international list of magic shops with their street addresses and Internet URLs, but no bibliography.

Each of these books gets a 5 Star rating from me.
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Format: Paperback
"The Practical Encyclopedia of Magic" by Nicholas Einhorn is an excellent book of how to perform over 120 magic tricks, using over 1,000 color photographs in illustrations. It includes magic with cards, matches, rope, silk, and money. Also, it includes an illustrated history of magic and magicians. The magic explained within is mostly of the "sleight of hand" type of trick. Most of the tricks are simple and within the skills of most teenagers and young adults. While some practice is required for some of the tricks, most are not difficult.

I have gone through a number of similar books that explain magic tricks and this one seems ideal for a father to impress his children and teach them a little bit about the 'real' world. Often, things are not as they seem. Also, for some one who, just, wants to liven up a party, this book may help. Finally, one of the nice points of this book is that all the props used are normal everyday object. No marked decks of cards, no loaded dice, no two-headed coins, and no 'special' props such as hollowed wands.

However, if one wishes to become a serious student of 'stage' magic, this book is a small start in a long process.

I give this book very high marks and recommend it.
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