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Practical Guide to the Care of the Medical Patient: Expert Consult: Online and Print, 8e 8th Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0323071581
ISBN-10: 0323071589
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Product Details

  • Series: Practical Guide
  • Ring-bound: 616 pages
  • Publisher: Mosby; 8 edition (June 25, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0323071589
  • ISBN-13: 978-0323071581
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 4.6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #689,950 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Ring-bound
First, the negatives: the binder feels like an afterthought. It's poorly made (the cover ink is rubbing off after a week of kicking around my pocket), the pages barely fit in and are sometimes hard to flip because the rings are overloaded even when some extraneous pages are removed, and the pages sometimes have holes punched in the middle of words (footnotes from charts, typically, but rarely).

The good: I love the content. I'm in my first rotation, medicine, and I originally had "the red book" but honestly it was beyond my level, and my school has uptodate on computers everywhere you could look. What I wanted was something that could remind me of pertinent details of a disease, things to look for when working up a patient, and something I could study from in five minutes here or there but not so condensed and abbreviated that I had to flip back and forth to a list of abbreviations to make heads or tails of what I was reading.

Still, the best advice I've gotten is to wait a few days into a rotation before buying a pocket reference book. Then ask yourself what you wish you had at hand just before working up a patient. Then go shopping.
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Format: Ring-bound
This is a review of an earlier edition of the book, but I believe it is still pertinent. I wrote this originally in 2004, hope it is useful for the med students and interns of today:

I am a transitional intern doing my gen med rotation. I was introduced to this book by my intern 2 years ago when I was a student during the first week of my gen med rotation. It was great then, and it is great now. I hate carrying stuff in my white coat, especially books of this size. But I refer to it constantly during the day. In rounds, in the ED while working up a patient, while reviewing a patient's labs. Numerous times each day. I have two students with me now, and I've convinced them after one week that they should buy this book. It's that good.
Details, ie, what it offers.

DDX, there is a DDX section in the front for common presenting symptoms. This is perhaps the books only weakness. It is too scant. Many common symptoms aren't included. The differentials offered are adequate, but the section could be expanded.

Systems Based Chapters. CV, Pulm, GI, ID,Neuro, Renal etc. The stuff you see everday on the wards is reviewed very well, with signs, symptoms, diagnostic workup and treatment. These chapters are not everything you need to know. I do more reading at night on specific ailments my patients are presenting with. But in the ED when you are accepting a thyroid storm, CVA, GIB, whatever, its there and it will get you through the admission and the evening until morning rounds with the attending.

Another great feature is the section that helps to interpret many labs you may order. Elevated, normal or low anything, and it provides a great differential. It can make you look smart on rounds.
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Format: Ring-bound
The author tried to improve this edition to be compared with the "Pocket Med". This makes this ed less informative than the last one and dont get any better than Sabatine's, just comparable in my humble opinion. It increases abbreviations and try to cut the introduction in each cases out which is a strong advantage of this book. In sum, if the author wants this book in the hands of residents or shelved at wards, this would be a better improvement (which i mentioned earlier that it still does not beat the Pocket Med of MGH) but if this is the approach to med students or interns like me who hate flipping pages for abbreviations and not smart enough to ingest such a short explanation in each diseases, something need to be done in the next edition.

Well, i think nowadays lots of publishers try to print a "cook book" out here, it may make a lot of profit but some of us still want a book with rational and concise explanations.
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Format: Ring-bound Verified Purchase
As stated in the title of my review this is the best resource for the medicine rotation, I also used it for my Family Medicine rotation. I compared it to my classmate's pocket book (a popular Medicine pocket book which contained less info and was often to advanced for them to understand) and I am glad that I choose this book. The advantages of this book when compared to other books is that it contains a section for differential diagnosis, normal lab values and a differential for low or increased lab values, and great explanations of various diseases, which tests to order, and medications to give.
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Format: Ring-bound Verified Purchase
Disappointed with the newest edition of this old stand by. The older edition formats with everything grouped by system was much more helpful when using to grab a few minutes of studying when on rounds in between patients or when on call. One could compare information about related disorders more readily when grouped by system instead of alphabetically. Reading from one topic to another within the same body system helps one synthesize and assimiliate information better and this aspect of learning is totally lost when medical disorders are listed alphabetically. The new notebook structure is also fraught with problems of the book falling apart, pages tearing out , etc. EDITORS OF BOOK PLEASE NOTE.....BRING BACK OLD FORMAT
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