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Practical Guide to Past-Life Memories: Twelve Proven Methods (Practical Guide Series) Paperback – November 8, 2001


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Practical Guide to Past-Life Memories: Twelve Proven Methods (Practical Guide Series) + Past Life Regression: A Guide for Practitioners + Many Lives, Many Masters: The True Story of a Prominent Psychiatrist, His Young Patient, and the Past-Life Therapy That Changed Both Their Lives
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Product Details

  • Series: Practical Guide Series (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications (November 8, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738700770
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738700779
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 4.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #384,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Webster was born and raised in New Zealand. He has been interested in the psychic world since he was nine years old. As a teenager, he became involved in hypnotism and later became a professional stage hypnotist. After school, he worked in the publishing business and purchased a bookstore. The concept of reincarnation played a significant role in his decision to become a past-life specialist. Richard has also taught psychic development classes, which are based on many of his books.

Richard's first book was published in 1972, fulfilling a childhood dream of becoming an author. Richard is now the author of over a hundred books, and is still writing today. His best-selling books include Spirit Guides & Angel Guardians and Creative Visualization for Beginners. 

Richard has appeared on several radio and TV programs in the United States and abroad including guest spots on Hard Copy, WMAQ-TV (Chicago), KTLA-TV (Los Angeles), KSTW-TV (Seattle) and the Mike and Matty Show (ABC). He currently resides in New Zealand with his wife and three children. He regularly travels the world to give lectures, workshops and to continue his research.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

Your Many Past Lives

Birth is not a beginning; death is not an end.
Chuang Tzu (369?–286? b.c.e.)

My husband and I went on a camping trip last summer. We had never done anything like it before, and I found it hard to fall asleep outdoors under the stars. It was beautiful lying there in my husband's arms, but once he fell asleep I'd lie there for hours, half expecting an attack at any moment. Three days into the vacation I managed to fall asleep in the middle of the night and dreamt that I was a young American Indian boy lost in the same area we were camping in. I could feel the young boy's nervousness and fear as he struggled to find food and make his way home. He lay on the ground at night, just as I was doing, and he wasn't able to sleep either as he was aware of every sound and movement. He seemed to think he was being followed or pursued, and all day long he kept looking behind him. He did this day after day. Eventually, it all got to be too much for him and he began to run. He caught his foot in the root of a tree and fell, breaking a leg. He couldn't move, and he lay on the ground waiting for death. When I woke up, I was sweating and my heart was racing. I'm convinced that I was that boy. It was far too vivid and real to be a dream."

"All my life I've had this strange feeling of forboding, as if something bad is about to happen. Last year I visited Athens for the first time and when I went to the Parthenon the feeling totally overcame me. I collapsed onto the steps, tears rolling down my face. People came up and asked if they could help, but there was nothing I could tell them. All I know is that I had been there before. Not in this lifetime, but in another life. Something bad happened to me in the Parthenon and visiting it again released all of those feelings I've always had. Since that day I've been totally free of them. I'm not sure if I really want to find out what happened in that past life."

"My brothers and sisters learned to swim easily, but I was always terrified of water. It made my father furious as we were a boating family and spent all our vacations either on or beside the ocean. When I was thirteen my parents took me to a hypnotist for nail-biting. While there, I spontaneously regressed to a past life on a small Pacific island. It was a good life, and we made our living catching fish. One day we were racing home ahead of a storm, but got caught up in it. I fell overboard, and even though I was a strong swimmer, I drowned. I had never given reincarnation a thought until then. The hypnotist explained it all to me, but I never told my parents about it as it seemed so strange. The weirdest part was that my wife in that past life is my mother in this life. That confused me for years."

Have you ever wondered about your past lives? Many people do. For some this interest is sparked by a vague, faint memory they have of something that happened in the past. For others it's a desire to know more about themselves—where they have been and where they are going. No matter what your reasons may be, you can successfully explore your own past lives.

People have believed in the concept of reincarnation for thousands of years. Belief in reincarnation is universal too. People in Asia, the Americas, Africa, Australasia, and Europe all believe that death is not the end, and that we will be reborn into another body.

In the East reincarnation has always been taken for granted. It is an essential part of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. It was not originally part of Shintoism, but once Buddhism reached Japan in the twelfth century it gradually became part of the belief system there. Reincarnation is not part of Islamic beliefs but the Sufi sect does accept the concept of rebirth.

The ancient Egyptians buried magic spells with the deceased to enable them to be reborn in whatever form they chose. In Greece in the sixth century b.c.e., the Orphic cult taught that we are all part evil and part divine. And as we progress through different incarnations we learn to eliminate the evil side of our natures and ultimately become divine. At this stage, of course, the cycle of rebirth is complete.1

The ideas of the Orphics were later adopted by Pythagoras and became an integral part of his philosophy. Pythagoras was able to recall his previous lives. Iamblichus, in his Life of Pythagoras, wrote, "What Pythagoras wished to indicate by all these particulars was that he knew the former lives he had lived, which enabled him to bring providential attention to others and remind them of their former existences."2 Pythagoras remembered lives as the Trojan warrior Euphorbus, as the prophet Hermotimus who was burned to death by his rivals, as the Cypriot fisherman Pyrrhus, as a prostitute in Phoenicia, a peasant in Thrace, and the wife of a shopkeeper in Thrace.3

Socrates, too, believed in reincarnation strongly. He is believed to have spent the last morning of his life thinking about how the soul existed before someone was born and will continue to live after the physical body has died. Socrates used philosophy to analyze human life, which is where his most famous saying—"Know thyself"—comes from. His original ideas about the soul are still being discussed today.

Socrates' most famous pupil, Plato, was a firm believer in reincarnation and wrote, "Know that if you become worse you will go to the worse souls, or if better to the better, and in every succession of life and death you will do and suffer what like may fitly suffer at the hands of like."4 Plato's ideas on reincarnation had a profound effect on Western philosophy that is still present today.

Later still, Greek Gnosticism adopted the concept of reincarnation. It played an important role in early Christian beliefs. In the second century c.e., Clement of Alexandria wrote that we developed through a process of many incarnations. Origen, one of the most important theologians of the day, agreed with him.

A number of passages in the Bible appear to take the concept of reincarnation for granted. In Matthew 11:13–15 Jesus tells his disciples who John the Baptist had been in a previous life: "For all the prophets and the law prophesied until John. And if ye will receive it, this is Elias, which was for to come. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear." This statement is confirmed in Matthew 17:12 where Jesus says, "But I say unto you, that Elias is come already, and they knew him not, but have done unto him whatsoever they listed. Likewise shall also the Son of man suffer of them." On another occasion Jesus asked his disciples, "Who do men say that I the Son of man am?" The reply was, "Some say that thou art John the Baptist; some Elias; and others Jeremias, or one of the prophets" (Matthew 16:13–14).

The disciples make another reference to reincarnation when they ask Jesus about a man who had been blind from birth: "And his disciples asked him, saying, Master, who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind?" (John 9:2). Obviously, it would have been impossible for this man to have sinned before he was born, unless he had sinned in a previous life. Interestingly, Jesus does not rebuke his disciples for thinking in this way: "Jesus answered, 'Neither hath this man sinned, nor his parents, but that the works of God should be made manifest in him'" (John 9:3).

Unfortunately, in 553 c.e. the Council of Constantinople declared that reincarnation was a heretical doctrine. The Christian Church immediately renounced the concept of reincarnation and forced its believers underground. Reincarnation was again considered heretical by both the Council of Lyons in 1274 and the Council of Florence in 1493. Anyone believing in reincarnation risked being burned at the stake.

Despite this, belief in reincarnation did not disappear. Possibly the most famous of these underground sects were the Cathars who were destroyed by the Inquisition. Interestingly, the only references to reincarnation in the Bible are favorable ones.5

During the Renaissance in Europe there was an upsurge of interest in the ideas of Pythagoras, the Kabbalah, and Platonism. Leonardo da Vinci was one of many people who accepted the concept of reincarnation. His Notebooks include several passages expressing his belief that the soul was eternal. Also, when Giordano Bruno was found guilty of heresy and was to be put to death in 1600, he told the Inquisition, "I have held and hold souls to be immortal. . . . Since the soul is not found without body and yet is not body, it may be in one body or in another, and pass from body
to body."6

The concept of reincarnation can be found in the Jewish Kabbalah7 and the Zohar.8 There are also numerous mentions of reincarnation in the Indian Bhagavad Gita and Upanishads, and the references to it in the Islamic Koran are favorable ones.9 In Buddhism the ultimate aim is to be freed from the endless cycle of rebirth and to achieve nirvana. In fact, the concept of reincarnation, or a variant of it, can be found in the traditions of most people throughout the world.

Interest in reincarnation grew steadily throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Paine wrote on the subject in America.
At the same time Voltaire, Victor Hugo, George Sand, and Gustave Flaubert in France, Johann von Goethe, Immanuel Kant, and Gotthold Lessing in Germany, and David Hume and Alexander Pope in England were educating the public about it in Europe.

The modern-day revival of interest in reincarnation began with the work of the Theosophical Society. The Theosophical Society was intended to be a universal brotherhood that promoted the study of comparative religion, philosophy, and science, and investigated the unexplained laws in nature. Today, the society promotes no specific dogmas, but tends to accept the reality of reincarnation and karma. The Theosophical Society was founded in 1875 b...

More About the Author

Richard Webster was born and raised in New Zealand. He has been interested in the psychic world since he was nine years old. As a teenager, he became involved in hypnotism and later became a professional stage hypnotist. After school, he worked in the publishing business and purchased a bookstore. The concept of reincarnation played a significant role in his decision to become a past-life specialist. Richard has also taught psychic development classes, which are based on many of his books.
Richard's first book was published in 1972, fulfilling a childhood dream of becoming an author. Richard is now the author of over seventy-five titles on New Age subjects. His best-selling books include Spirit Guides & Angel Guardians and Creative Visualization for Beginners.
Richard has appeared on several radio and TV programs in the United States and abroad including guest spots on Hard Copy, WMAQ-TV (Chicago), KTLA-TV (Los Angeles), KSTW-TV (Seattle) and the Mike and Matty Show (ABC). He currently resides in New Zealand with his wife and three children. He regularly travels the world to give lectures, workshops and to continue his research.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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His books are very easy to understand.
Jennifer
Great book, many interesting stories about past lives.
Cheyenne Hulst
I know it's frustrated me as well as others.
Blair Robertson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

105 of 106 people found the following review helpful By Blair Robertson on April 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
I've been teaching past life classes for years. Occasionally, you run across a student that has a "block", they just can't get through to their past. I know it's frustrated me as well as others.
Finally, here's a book that gives you not one, but MANY ways to uncover your past lives. My personal favorite is the tick-tock method that is virtually foolproof and something I have never seen in print before.
Richard Webster's experience truly shines through in this book. If you've ever wondered about past lives and wanted to do it on your own, here's the book.
I highly recommend it.
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76 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Laura De Giorgio TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 27, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read many wonderful books on past-life regression for hypnotherapists, and a few self-help books for past-life regression, but if you choose to experiment on your own, this book is your best shot.

Simply put, this is no different than remembering what you did last year, ten years ago, fifteen years ago, and then going backward in time.

Out of many different methods, my favorite is following your emotions. That being said, you may or may not like what you experience using this method. There is another fun book (perhaps my favorite on past-life regression - Mind-Probe Hypnosis by Irene Hickman - while this other book does not deal with methods you'd do on your own, it may give you a good picture on what you may expect to encounter following this particular method - a bunch of unresolved issues from the past. While it may be useful resolving them - it may not be necessarily pleasant experience.

You may also think of something that you have particular affinity for in this life and trace that emotion - experiencing that pleasant emotion you can trace them back to the original experience that gave rise to such emotions. That may be a more pleasant experience.

While the experiments I did with techniques from this book were instantly successful, I can say that the life I have right now is a much happier experience than anything I managed to dig out from the past.

We may entertain romantic ideas about some better past, and some memories may perhaps enrich your present life, but what you are more likely to discover that life and learning moves forward and that whatever you may be experiencing in your life right now may very well be the most wonderful part of your life.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Heather Brush on May 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
Many people believe in reincarnation, myself included, but also, many are skeptics. Here is a chance for everyone to understand better those moments of dTja vu. Believers will have an easier time of it, but skeptics may just learn a little something along the way too, if not more so.

Richard Webster is a hypnotherapist and lecturer on many psychic topics. He is the author of over thirty books and is seen in many circles as a guru of the paranormal. In "Past-Life Memories" Richard gives us twelve proven methods of accessing the memories that are hidden in our brains.

By way of explanation of past life memories, the soul is a continuing energy that enters life again and again. We are here to learn lessons and to grow, but are usually without our memories of past lives so that these images do not interfere with what we are here to do. Certainly you may feel compelled to do certain things, such as staying far away from high places; perhaps in a past life you had fallen to your death from a cliff. But you may not understand your current fear of heights. By exploring your past life memories, you may be able to put those fears to rest and live happier in this life.

There are numerous methods of uncovering these memories, from dreaming of your past lives to scrying, hypnotherapy to spirit guide assistance, but since all of us are individuals, one method may work for some while it doesn't for others. Much like finding a comfortable position in which to sleep, you will need to try different things to see what works best for you, hence, Richard's twelve methods.

Mr. Webster has a wonderful voice in his works. He is knowledgeable and respected in his understanding of these topics; authoritative, yet he is gentle and convincing, a true teacher and guiding spirit.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer VINE VOICE on August 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
I just love Richard Webster. His books are very easy to understand. Practical Guide to Past Life Memories is my favorite book on the subject. He gives you twelve different methods to connect to a past life. I just picked one method to start and it worked! The very first time! You can very easily find your method because there is a chapter dedicated to each one. This book is fun and very informative but not so much where you could get bored. Get this book!
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Christina Moseley on March 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
A long time ago, I read some books about past life regressions. Finally I got this book and read it. But when I discovered at the use of automatic writing, I thought it was too good to be true. Why did Alantis existed during king tut's time? And why I was a priestess that reincarnated into a Crusader inside the middle ages? Even though most of it is not foolproof, I finally got a hold of my past lives. So if you are looking to talk to your spirit guide, this is a book for you if you are looking into your past lives.
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