Practice Resurrection and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.38
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.00
  • Save: $8.62 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 24? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Practice Resurrection: A Conversation on Growing Up in Christ Hardcover


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$15.38
$9.07 $5.20

Frequently Bought Together

Practice Resurrection: A Conversation on Growing Up in Christ + Practice Resurrection Study Guide
Price for both: $20.78

Buy the selected items together
  • Practice Resurrection Study Guide $5.40

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 76%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (January 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802829554
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802829559
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Christian maturity and character formation isn't about finding a strategy, or setting goals, or measuring congregational growth by market analysis, argues the writer in a chapter-by-chapter analysis of the New Testament book of Ephesians. Professor emeritus at Vancouver's Regent College and author of more than 34 books, including the popular Message paraphrase of the Bible, Peterson practices what he calls theological aesthetics, giving new vitality to such common words in the Christian vocabulary as saint, gift, and church. Christians are called to live out the resurrected life that was incarnate first in Jesus and then in us, the author asserts. It's no insult to the veteran writer to say that his tone is sometimes imperative and occasionally even a little cranky. After all, the message isn't new—but the commentary is, as usual, thought provoking and helpful for readers who want a different, sometimes contrarian, perspective on Christian discipleship. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Marva J. Dawn
-- author of Reaching Out without Dumbing Down
"This is the perfect culmination to Eugene Peterson's fivefold Conversations in Spiritual Theology. How much the church would be transfigured if we could all more fully live as one with Christ in His Resurrection! You will delight in the way Peterson takes portions of Ephesians and displays the results of 'rocket' verbs and other word choices, of disciplines toward maturity, and of movements 'upward, inward, Godward.' This is a life-transforming book for us all!"

Publishers Weekly
"Peterson practices what he calls 'theological aesthetics,' giving new vitality to such common words in the Christian vocabulary as 'saint,' 'gift,' and 'church.'. . . The message isn't new -- but the commentary is, as usual, thought-provoking and helpful for readers who want a different, sometimes contrarian, perspective on Christian discipleship."

Christian Century
"This is the fifth and culminating contribution to Peterson's series of books on spiritual theology. . . . Peterson builds bridge after bridge from the biblical text to our contemporary context. . . . In both the goals of the book and the quality of the writing, Peterson has provided an extraordinary example of pastoral scholarship." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Peterson, now retired, was for many years James M. Houston Professor of Spiritual Theology at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. He also served as founding pastor of Christ Our King Presbyterian Church in Bel Air, Maryland. In addition to his widely acclaimed paraphrase of the Bible, The Message (NavPress), he has written many other books.

Customer Reviews

The author is very candid and vulnerable of his own process as a pastor.
Mary S
In his approach to maturity Peterson will diminish neither the power of the culture and customs that shape us nor the power of the resurrected Jesus to transform us.
David Swanson
The study guide is helpful, it helps facilitate group discussion. great to use when you need to get a discussion going.
Z

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Grant Marshall on March 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
When it comes to his books, Peterson and I have a love hate relationship. I've read 4 out 5 in this series (Eat this book is one I haven't got yet) and each time I find myself going through a similar wave of emotion. There are times when Peterson meanders and waffles on to the point where I am ready to close the book and throw it away. But when I hit that point Peterson brings everything he's said to a sharp conclusion, and it all makes sense. I love his books and I hate them at the same time. But I have to say that this was his best effort since "Christ plays in 10,000 places". The book is an informal commentary on Ephesians, which Peterson claims to have taught for many years to his congregations. Peterson is intent on seeing Christians grow to the full measure of stature in Christ. In other words Peterson wants us to become mature Christians, not tossed by every wind and doctrine. There is so much meat in this book that it's hard to summarise it all. I really like his chapter on Grace and Works. All my life I had seen the two as almost antithetical to each other. At best they should be a sign of the grace already received from Christ. But Peterson took a different route. Grace always requires a form, a container, otherwise it becomes an impersonal and abstract doctrine. Good works are the containers for Grace to be taken out from the impersonal to the personal. God is intensely personal, nothing about the God we serve is impersonal. I had never thought of it from that angle. If you've got the time and patience, read this whole series from start to finish. Scott Mcknight is right, one does not skim Peterson, one ponders Peterson.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 55 people found the following review helpful By The Least of These on March 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Practice Resurrection: A Conversation on Growing Up in Christ

I had a lot of bad assumptions about Peterson. Initially, I thought THE MESSAGE was just another paraphrase intent on dumbing down the gospel, watering the Word, and trying to be "seeker-friendly" at the expense of becoming God-less. I carried those false assumptions into my reading of PRACTICE RESURRECTION. I was wrong. This was the first Peterson book I have read. I cannot tell you how many times I found myself practically shouting, "Amen," "Praise the Lord," "right on," etc. I even went out and bought a copy of the CONVERSATIONS version of THE MESSAGE. I have come to accept it as one more tool in increasing my personal understanding of God's Word, improving the quality of my walk with Christ, and in motivating me to BE more, DO more, LOVE more, not to grieve the Holy Spirit, and just be a better member of the body of Christ. JESUS IS LORD. And, Eugene Peterson knows that, teaches, that and blesses as he shares his very keen spiritual insights.

Did I say I was wrong before? Well, count me a fan now.

Buy this book, read it, share it and buy yourself a second copy to highlight, write notes in, and put all those little post-it flags in to mark your favorite passages. Unfortunately for me, the WHOLE book is a favorite passage.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By J. Lonas on March 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Church takes a lot of beatings in popular Christianity today. Tell-all memoirs from the hottest new writers detailing the quirks and sins of "church people" and the psychological harm they've caused fly off the shelves. It has become fashionable to debate the value of the Church to the cause of Christ, and words like "community" and "gathering" have become the acceptable way to describe the assembly of believers. Too many of the rebuttals written by traditionalists seem more concerned with tradition than with the Church.

In Practice Resurrection, Peterson explores the Church as it is, the Body of Christ born of the Holy Spirit, not as it has been or as we would like it to be. He is mindful that the Church is imperfect (by way of its composition of sinners saved by grace), but seeks to build it up rather than deconstructing it. He writes, "Sooner or later, though, if we are serious about growing up in Christ, we have to deal with the church. I say sooner."

Peterson's book (the fifth in a series of works on spiritual theology) is, in essence, an informal commentary on the book of Ephesians. He points out that almost all New Testament letters to churches were written because of something--doctrinal error, rampant sinfulness, pointless squabbles, etc.--but Ephesians appears to be motivated by Christ's love for His people. He applies Paul's encouragement to the Ephesians to the life of today's Church as a model, urging believers to "walk worthy of the calling with which [we] have been called" (Eph. 4:1).

The title, Practice Resurrection, comes from Paul's grounding of His entire description of the Body in the fact of Christ's resurrection.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Bud Surles on March 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wellspring is the name that comes to my mind everytime I pick up a Eugene Peterson book. I consider him my best friend, yet he does not even know me. I read and re-read until his next book comes out. And I am never disappointed. He writes for those who can't get even of God but have had enough of legalism and liberalism. He protects the word, he explains the word, and in the end, we understand the word better.

Bud Surles
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa497a408)