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219 of 226 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow - A Praying Life for me
This book is different. This book just might change things. Within the first few chapters, actually within the first few pages, I could tell that Paul Miller was describing something that I had never experienced before.

First, he honestly and precisely identifies the barriers to prayer - a short attention span, guilt, inconsistency, and weak attempts to...
Published on April 24, 2009 by Papa Grande

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40 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Warm, Gritty Treatment: Yet Much More Must Be Said
I'm somewhat ambivalent about this book. Partly because many raving reviews led to high expectations on my part and partly because this is an odd book. The phrase that kept coming to my mind while I read it was "A Praying Memoir" for that's what it felt like. Though perhaps more often than necessary, Miller gave dozens of personal stories that gave the book a helpful,...
Published on February 8, 2012 by N. C. Moore


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219 of 226 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow - A Praying Life for me, April 24, 2009
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This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
This book is different. This book just might change things. Within the first few chapters, actually within the first few pages, I could tell that Paul Miller was describing something that I had never experienced before.

First, he honestly and precisely identifies the barriers to prayer - a short attention span, guilt, inconsistency, and weak attempts to follow a formula that would somehow make my prayers acceptable to God. Yet his winsome way of presenting these problems are not a condemnation of our failures, but are actually an encouragement not to give up.

Somewhere in the middle of the book, it begins to dawn on you that a relationship with God that is guided by prayer just might be attainable. Then Paul introduces a simple way to keep track of the many prayer stories that develop as we carry on an intimate conversation with a God who wants us to know and love him.

If you are searching for meaning, read this book. If you are jaded in your Christianity or prayers, read this book. If you want to free yourself from praying "correctly" and learn to pray honestly, read this book. If you are too busy to read anything else this Summer - read this book.
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94 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best Books I've Read on Prayer, May 11, 2009
This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
So many times I have gone to a book on prayer looking for encouragement in praying only to come away overwhelmed with all I am not doing in prayer. Miller's A Praying Life is different. This book increased my desire to pray and helped explain to me why prayer is often something I am tempted to abandon. The first part of the book gently calls the reader back to childlike trust in God, pointing to this sort of faith as the prerequisite for real relationship with God. Parts two and three explore the issues which hinder the praying life. These chapters were particularly helpful in that they showed that the reason we don't pray is not usually busyness or laziness. Instead, we do not pray because of wrong thinking about God, about our expectations of God, and about ourselves. These chapters are designed to undo some of the bad thinking in our lives which leads to a weak prayer life. Parts four and five are much more personal and practical, as Miller attempts to lead the reader to rediscover the joy of a praying life. Miller shares in these chapters particularly his own personal prayer journey and how his life and the lives of those he loves have been shaped by prayer. There are numerous practical tips in the latter chapters that are very helpful to anyone seeking to grow in prayer.

This is a rare book, for it addresses both the internal motivations of prayer and the outward practice of prayer. I don't need a pep rally, I need practicality. Yet at the same time, while I need practicality, I also need to understand the foundational reasons why prayer sometimes malfunctions in my life. Miller's book does an excellent job of addressing both of these needs.
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114 of 133 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Learn How to Live a Life of Prayer, June 1, 2009
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This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
Any time I write a review of a book dealing with prayer I feel the need to point out that bookstore shelves are already groaning under the weight of such books. There are hundreds, thousands probably, of books on prayer. A new one is going to need to be good--very good--to supplant the excellent resources already available. Paul Miller, perhaps a bit reluctantly, takes on this challenge in his new book A Praying Life: Connecting with God in a Distracting World. I was drawn to this book by David Powlison's Foreword in which he gives it his highest recommendation and says, "A Praying Life will bring a living, vibrant reality to your prayers. Take it to heart." And what Christian does not want to learn to pray better? What Christian would claim that his prayers are as powerful as ever he would want them to be? The vast number of books on this subject testifies to the Christians' desire to pray more and to pray better.

A Praying Life is the fruit of the prayer seminars that Miller has led scores of times over the years. And in the structure, in what it teaches, it has the practical, real-life feel of a seminar. The meat of the book is family stories--not dramatic tales, but just small vignettes of daily life and survival. These stories do not only offer that personal touch that takes the book out of the abstract, but they also provide a measure of cohesion, tying chapter-to-chapter and part-to-part.

The book begins with a brief reflection on why Christians struggle so much with prayer. Miller says rightly, I'm sure, that many people fail to pray properly because they are pursuing prayer rather than God. Ironically, they make prayer their focus instead of focusing on the one to whom they are praying. Prayer becomes an end in itself rather than the means to relationship with God. No wonder, then, that we struggle! "Consequently, prayer is not the center of this book. Getting to know a person, God, is the center." Another source of the frustration that many people feel when they reflect on their prayer lives comes from working on this discipline in the abstract, separated from the rest of life. This is why Miller advocates a praying life, a life of prayer and not just small moments of prayer. This is something that needs to be learned over time and that needs to be nurtured. "A praying life isn't something you accomplish in a year. It is a journey of a lifetime."

Miller teaches prayer in thirty-two (!) chapters divided into five parts. In the first part, he writes about praying like a child, writing about the childlike trust and wonder that so moved Jesus and caused him to use children as an example to his disciples. Miller wants readers to learn to talk with their Father, to learn to love spending time with their Father, to learn to be helpless as children are before their father and to learn to cry "Abba" continually just as Jesus did. In Part 2 he encourages readers to "trust again," to put aside the cynicism that is endemic to our culture. This cynicism is a large part of what keeps us from enjoying God and trusting him in prayer. Part 3 is dedicated to learning how to petition God, to ask for things in prayer and to do so with confidence. He shows why we find it so hard to ask and teaches the grounds by which we can ask. He then looks at God's promises regarding daily bread and "your kingdom come" along with Jesus' extravagant promises that "whatever you ask in my name, I will do." The fourth part is about living in the Father's story, about seeing prayer as part of the grand story God is weaving into the lives of his people. The fifth and final part, "Praying in Real Life," is the most practical part of the book, teaching real-life praying through journaling, using prayer cards, and so on. This is the small bit of practical application that follows a lot of good teaching.

A Praying Life is a very quotable book that offers many excellent lines, sentences, reflections. Here is just a single example of one that caught my attention. Miller asks, "How would you love someone without prayer? I mean, what would it look like if you loved someone but couldn't pray for that person? It was a puzzle to me. I couldn't figure out what it would look like. Love without being able to pray feels depressing and frustrating, like trying to tie a knot with gloves on. I would be powerless to do the other person any real good. People are far too complicated; the world is far too evil; and my own heart is too off center to be able to love adequately without praying. I need Jesus."

From the earliest chapters to the last, the book is full of good teaching. Miller says very little that is not immediately supported by Scripture and, even in a book that is full of stories of his family, is able to keep himself out of the limelight. This is a book foremost about God--the God who asks his people to come to him and to come with him in confidence that he hears and answers prayer. He offers constant challenges to first understand prayer properly and then to pray, knowing that God desires that his people pray.

I do want to point out what I consider a weakness in the book, and it has to do with some of the people Miller quotes. Those who have read other books on prayer may well see that Miller is indebted to the mystics; he has clearly derived at least a portion of his theology and practice of prayer from them. At times there is a certainly mystical quality in what he teaches. We can begin to see the source of this in the several times he quotes Thomas Merton. Now I do know that many people quote Merton as an authority on prayer; I have not read his books on prayer so cannot comment. However, necessarily, as a Roman Catholic Trappist monk, Merton's theology will get worse the closer he gets to the cross. Hence I think an author would wish to quote him only with the utmost care. My concern with Miller's book is that he may lead people to investigate Merton and read there not only what Merton wrote on prayer but also what he wrote on other subjects. Thus there is good reason to be just a little bit cautious here. This mystical emphasis on prayer runs as an undercurrent through the book, not destroying it but at times, I feel, detracting from it.

Leave aside that concern, I still do not hesitate to recommend A Praying Life. Perhaps the greatest strength of this book is Miller's unrelenting emphasis that prayer cannot be an add-on to the Christian life; it cannot be supplemental but must always be instrumental. This book will equip you to understand prayer properly and, on that firm foundation, to commit yourself to it, with confidence that God is willing and able to hear and answer your prayers.
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40 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Warm, Gritty Treatment: Yet Much More Must Be Said, February 8, 2012
By 
N. C. Moore (Winston-Salem, NC United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
I'm somewhat ambivalent about this book. Partly because many raving reviews led to high expectations on my part and partly because this is an odd book. The phrase that kept coming to my mind while I read it was "A Praying Memoir" for that's what it felt like. Though perhaps more often than necessary, Miller gave dozens of personal stories that gave the book a helpful, earthy feel. I appreciate the author's grittiness and willingness to take all the frustrations of a praying life seriously. The book was a strange mixture of really helpful thoughts followed by too many antidotes and personal details. I can however, see how this would appeal to some readers.

Using the Lord's prayer in the Garden as the primary model, Miller's treatment of Biblical teaching on prayer was very sparse and thus widely assumed. This is not to say that he did not have some helpful observations, just that this work lacked a Biblical treatment of prayer. His focus was much more on how to fit that practically into life. It should also be noted that there are several places where it is evident that Miller has been influenced by the Mystics. His mystic streaks detract some from the value of this work.

The most helpful parts of the book to me included his thoughts on what it means to become like a child in prayer, praying 'in God's story,' and his prayer card system.

While reading "A Praying Life," I simultaneously read C.S. Lewis' "Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer" Though I wasn't expecting many similarities, these books couldn't be more different. Lewis' thoughts were, as one might expect, much more philosophical as Lewis tried to grapple with the many extravagant promises regarding prayer in the Scriptures. Lewis seemed unable to come away with many conclusions. This reminded me that the current corpus of literature has a massive gap regarding the subject of prayer. This makes me judge Miller's effort more positively because prayer is quite mysterious. There is something good to be said for Miller's admirable attempts to, in spite of many unresolved mysteries, provide us a gritty memoir of how to pray. Notwithstanding this commendable effort, may I suggest that the reception of this book suggests that the church needs to do a whole lot more thinking (& writing) on the subject of prayer?

If you are looking for a deeply intimate, highly practical treatment of how to incorporate prayer into your life, this may be helpful to you.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review, June 5, 2009
This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
I hate praying. I don't think it works and I think it's foolish. But I read this book anyways (because I owed my wife) and I have been forced to rethink my prior position. There is a lot of honesty in this book about why praying is so difficult, and for me, that gave it a lot of credibility. Paul Miller articulated a lot of my cynicism and frustration with prayer (both corporate and individual), and gave me reasons to question my outright dismissal of God as a personal God. I'm not totally convinced (Hell will freeze over before I start praying for parking spaces), but this book challenged me, at the least, to attempt to re-establish a personal relationship with God.
If you're a gung-ho Christian who has the world figured out, you'll hate this book. If you're a frustrated cynic like me, I would heartily recommend it.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There is hope, April 29, 2009
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This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
This book is an easy, encouraging read which makes me WANT to pray without feeling guilty about what a loser I am. Paul Miller's openness about his own life and struggles makes him feel like a friend in my home rather than an intellectual writer who has arrived at greatness and is telling me about it from a distance. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to be engaged in prayer but feels discouraged, distant, confused, too tired or bored with the whole idea. The author doesn't make claims to fix your prayer life in 30 days but rather to point you to the One to whom you pray for a life-long conversation with Him.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book I've read in years!, August 15, 2009
This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
As a lifelong Christian, I've heard a great deal of teaching about prayer and read a good many books on the topic. I've been taught to model my prayers on The Lord's Prayer. I've learned the ACTS method (Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, Supplication). I've been encouraged to trust God for impossible answers, and above all, I've been made very aware of my spiritual shortcomings with regard to the discipline of regular, personal prayer.

Like many, I have tended to view prayer as a spiritual discipline I need to accomplish. So I try harder to do this prayer thing -- this spiritual event accompanied by certain kinds of emotions and feelings. When I fail, I am overcome with guilt. When I don't pray, I find it hard to start praying again. It seems I just never measure up to my perfect ideal of what my personal praying should be. Don't get me wrong, I've enjoyed wonderful seasons of prayer. I've had many spiritually high moments in prayer. I've seen God work through my prayers. But I don't have the level of spiritual stamina at praying that I would like.

Given this context, I jumped at the chance to participate in a 30 day challenge which included reading Paul Miller's "A Praying Life: Connecting with God in a Distracting World", from NavPress. The specific challenge was to read the book, and post about the results of a personal 30 days of real prayer, implementing the principles from the book in my own prayer life. Thanks again, Michelle Bennett for that challenge. I'm so glad I read this book.

"A Praying Life" is easily the best book I've read in the past several years. Miller speaks with an uncommon grace, and his book plants the spiritual discipline of prayer squarely upon the truths of the Gospel. A praying life is the goal, not regular disciplined moments of spiritual ecstasy. Miller's book is distinguished from others I've read in that it stresses prayer's connection with the gospel, it explains how a lack of prayer betrays a lack of dependence on God, and it illustrates through Paul Miller's own personal family stories, how prayer connects with all of life. In short, the book makes a praying life seem real, and possible.

I wish I could say after these 30 days, that my prayer life has been completely revolutionized. But after reading the book, I can definitely say my thinking about prayer has. I want to share a few of the principles that came home powerfully to me as I read this book.

First, I was reminded that Jesus invites us to pray. And our prayer is part of a life lived in confidence in the Gospel.

"Jesus does not say, 'Come to me, all you who have learned how to concentrate in prayer, whose minds no longer wander, and I will give you rest.' No, Jesus opens his arms to his needy children and says, 'Come to Me, all who are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest' (Matthew 11:28, NASB). The criteria for coming to Jesus is weariness. Come overwhelmed with life. Come with your wandering mind. Come messy....

"We know that to become a Christian we shouldn't try to fix ourselves up, but when it comes to praying we completely forget that. We'll sing the old gospel hymn, 'Just as I Am,' but when it comes to praying, we don't come just as we are. We try, like adults, to fix ourselves up.

"Private, personal prayer is one of the last great bastions of legalism. In order to pray like a child, you might need to unlearn the nonpersonal, nonreal praying that you've been taught." (pg. 29-30)

"Prayer mirrors the gospel. In the gospel, the Father takes us as we are because of Jesus and gives us his gift of salvation. In prayer, the Father receives us as we are because of Jesus and gives us his gift of help. We look at the inadequacy of our praying and give up, thinking something is wrong with us. God looks at the adequacy of his Son and delights in our sloppy, meandering prayers." (pg. 53-54)

Second, I was challenged to see that when I don't pray, I am basically telling God I'm good enough that I don't really need him. Ouch! This point has really revolutionized how I think about prayer. I have more of a desire to pray, even though I'm still not "good enough" at it. Although I'll never really be good enough, still I want to show my dependence on God in praying constantly for specific help.

"If you are not praying, then you are quietly confident that time, money, and talent are all you need in life. You'll always be a little too tired, a little too busy. But if, like Jesus, you realize you can't do life on your own, then no matter how busy, no matter how tired you are, you will find the time to pray. Time in prayer makes you even more dependent on God because you don't have as much time to get things done. Every minute spent in prayer is one less minute where you can be doing something 'productive.' So the act of praying means that you have to rely more on God." (pg. 47)

Third, prayer really is about being helpless. We come to Christ in the gospel as a helpless sinner. We are to have faith like a helpless child. We should pray as helpless Christians. We really do need our Savior's continual help! This last line should get the "duh!" award. But so often we live like we really don't. The more mature we become as Christians, the more aware of our sinfulness and helplessness we should be. And thus we should pray more.

Fourth, I learned that "we don't need self-discipline to pray continuously". Instead "we just need to be poor in spirit".

"Poverty of spirit makes room for his Spirit. It creates a God-shaped hole in our hearts and offers us a new way to relate to others." (pg. 64)

"If we think we can do life on our own, we will not take prayer seriously. Our failure to pray will always feel like something else -- a lack of discipline or too many obligations. But when something is important to us, we make room for it. Prayer is simply not important to many Christians because Jesus is already an add-on." (pg. 57)

A big theme of the book is how suffering is often the context where we learn to pray. It grows us and shows us our true need. It helps make prayer important.

Fifth, prayer is not about some special feeling or perfect spiritual experience.

"Instead of hunting for the perfect spiritual state to lift you above the chaos, pray in the chaos. As your heart or your circumstances generate problems, keep generating prayer. You will find that the chaos lessens." (pg. 72)

Too often we seek the perfect spiritual state, when we really should just pray to God out of a heart full of need.

Sixth, I learned that prayer changes things. As we pray we should look for ways our prayers are having an effect. We should seek to use prayer to change the hearts of those we love. Our problems and all of life's difficulties can be shaped and met with prayer.

"When you stop trying to control your life and instead allow your anxieties and problems to bring you to God in prayer, you shift from worry to watching. You watch God weave his patterns in the story of your life. Instead of trying to be out front, designing your life, you realize you are inside God's drama." (pg. 72)

That's the secret of the praying life. It's not your own story, it's God. He becomes the One in control. By prayer we see Him working. By prayer we let Him into our lives.

Seventh, I was given a practical method of prayer which I've begun to adopt. He explains how to have a prayer card -- a 3.5" notecard -- for each major area in life that you pray about. Have one for each of the members of your family and pray a specific verse for them. Add individual requests to the card over time. Keep track of answers to prayer. I've slowly begun to create cards and I find them easier to use than a prayer list. It's more personal and focused on the subject or person at hand.

I've only scratched the surface of what is contained in the book. It is very readable, because Paul Miller interweaves personal stories of his children and life together with various prayers he has. He shows how prayer helped him deal with situations and persons. How prayer was answered slowly over time in the lives of his children. How prayer allowed him to parent well, and love others rather than react negatively.

I'm confident that if you pick up A Praying Life, your prayer life will improve as well. May God challenge us all to have praying lives.

Disclaimer: This book was provided by NavPress for review. I was under no obligation to offer a favorable review.
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27 of 34 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Encouraging book, though not overly deep, November 5, 2010
This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
In A Praying Life: Connecting With God in a Distracting World, Paul Miller offers us a different kind of book on prayer. This book has things that I found wonderfully encouraging and helpful. At the same time, this work is not an exhaustive work on the doctrine of prayer.

Positives

So many books on prayer offer lists of how to pray without seeming to be a part of real, modern, human life. Miller's book does not fall into this trap. Paul Miller is about as real in his description of his prayer life as any author I have read.

Miller's work is full of helpful stories and illustrations that help us to connect with him in his prayer life. Paul and his wife have an autistic daughter. As you might imagine, his stories of praying with his wife for the benefit of their daughter are touching and helpful to others who have experienced prayers that were answered by God in different ways than they expected.

I personally found myself encouraged by the way that miller talked about prayer in such a non-mystical way. Sometimes, in books on prayer, readers may get the impression that those who do not pray for hours at a time are missing the point of prayer. Of course, there is nothing wrong with long seasons of prayer. Yet, Miller shows how prayer can be beautiful for a Christian in the middle of the confusion of daily life.

Negatives

While I enjoyed this work, it was not the deepest handling of the issues of prayer. Miller teaches us more from his experience than from a systematic theological strategy. Miller cautions readers against being mislead by their own impressions while "listening to God," but then does not offer a deep theological defense of how this issue is to be handled.

Conclusion

I enjoyed A Praying Life, and would certainly recommend it to Christians who are struggling with their own lives of prayer. I think many will find the ideas present in this work encouraging and helpful. While the book is not as theological as some might want, it certainly has much to recommend it.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended, practical and accessible work on prayer!, June 9, 2009
By 
Shaun Tabatt (Cottage Grove, MN USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
If you were to ask the average Christian on the street for a list of the top five things they struggle with, I'm willing to bet that prayer will more often than not appear at the top of that list. Some may say the busyness of modern life steals away too much of their time. Others may say they feel like prayer just doesn't make a difference. While I'm willing to concede that time management challenges and feelings may affect our outlook on prayer, I'm not willing to accept these and other similar excuses as the sole reasons people struggle with or altogether avoid prayer. All excuses aside, I think the reality of the situation is that prayer can be downright difficult. Each of us attempts to approach God in prayer through the context of our own religious training and upbringing or for some, the lack thereof. Many of us are able to recite from memory the rote prayers we learned during our childhood. So many of these prayers are full of Biblical truth and deep theological meaning, but years of monotone repetition have left them feeling old and powerless. On the other end of the prayer spectrum you will find what some call "vending machine" prayers. These sorts of prayers consist of nothing more than our never ending list of wants and felt needs, addressing God like he is the proprietor of a heavenly candy store or a cosmic Santa Claus. Like the rote prayers of our childhood, these too will leave us feeling disappointed and frustrated with prayer and ultimately with God.

If this sounds all too familiar, chances are you could be one of the many who have been living in the midst of a lifelong struggle with prayer. Based on your experiences `til now, you may seriously wonder if there is any hope for long-term sustained change in your prayer life. Like me, you've probably read other books on prayer, only to shortly thereafter end up right back where you began. While I can't speak to all of the reasons those other books might have come up short for you, I can recommend a new book that has the potential revolutionize your prayer life. The author of this new book is Paul Miller. Paul is the director for SeeJesus.net, a discipling mission and developer of interactive Bible studies. As a part of his work for SeeJesus.net, he has developed The PrayerLife Study and Seminar, which were the basis for Paul's new book published by NavPress titled: A Praying Life: Connecting with God in a Distracting World. This book consists of thirty-two chapters, organized into six parts. They are as follows:

* Introductory material (Preface, Introduction, Chapters 1-2)
* Part 1: Learning to Pray Like a Child (Chapters 3-8)
* Part 2: Learning to Trust Again (Chapters 9-11)
* Part 3: Learning to ask Your Father (Chapters 12-18)
* Part 4: Living in your Father's Story (Chapters 19-25)
* Part 5: Praying in Real Life (Chapters 26-32)

Paul shares what he has learned over a lifetime of pursuing God in prayer. Much of what he shares is rooted in concrete examples from his own experiences, especially his experiences in the midst of the story God is weaving as Paul has been praying and caring for his family. The many personal examples throughout this book give a ring of authenticity to what Paul is asking us to do in our own prayer lives. This isn't just something he put together for a seminar and reworked for a book, he is practicing what he is preaching. There are many good things I've taken away from this book and have begun incorporating into my own prayer life. Without giving too much away, I'll list a few of the highlights below:

* Approach God the Father as a child with boldness, honesty, and need.
* Pray alone, but pray aloud.
* Start out simple (5 minutes) and increase your prayer time from there.
* Run away from cynicism and learn to trust God again.
* Prayer is an integral part of all of your life, talk to God about the big things and the small things.
* Understand that your life is part of a story God is weaving. Prayer shapes both you and your story.
* Keep praying when there seems to be no answer to prayer or even the "wrong" answer to prayer.
* Prayer cards and prayer journals will be helpful tools to better focus your prayers and show you how God is working in the midst of your story.

In all honesty, this is one of the best books on prayer I've read in quite some time. As I worked through the chapters, I began to evaluate my own prayer life and started to see quite a few areas where I was left wanting. Paul's personal stories helped me to see that there are many things I could do different and better when it comes to praying for my own family and other relationships. On a practical level, I'm especially excited to try incorporating prayer cards into my daily prayer routine. I highly recommend this book to anybody who has struggled with prayer or wants learn more about how God can work in the midst of a life filled with prayer. This book will be beneficial for personal reading, but the length of the chapters also makes it ideal for a small group or Sunday school setting. Readers who enjoy this book may also want consider Love Walked among Us (NavPress, 2001), also by Paul Miller. You can learn more about Paul and his ministry at [[...]

Paul Miller is the director of seejesus.net, a discipling mission and developer of interactive Bible Studies. In addition to A Praying Life, Paul has written Love Walked Among Us (NavPress, 2001). Paul and his wife Jill have six children, two daughters-in-law, two sons-in-law, and seven grandchildren. They live near Philadelphia, PA.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prayer + Life, September 23, 2011
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This review is from: A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World (Paperback)
What a neat book. Who's it for? Well, anyone who wants to make prayer a bigger part of their life. Those who have trouble praying on a consistent basis, or those who want to feel more connected with God through prayer will also enjoy this book.

And how does the book accomplish these lofty goals? Well, I could break down each chapter, but in a nutshell, it suggests re-framing how you think about your relationship with God, goes on to discuss the barriers to praying, and then gives you simple tools and ways of praying that he has found help people learn to pray.

So that's the basic "framework" of the book. Woven into these subjects are various stories, many of them from the author's family, which to me, gave the book a "real-world" feel to it. When you have trouble praying consistently like I do, the last thing you want is a book giving you a long list of ideas that have no practicality in your day-to-day life. Not here, in fact I feel like the subtitle of the book summarizes this book the best - connecting with God in a distracting world.

Don't have time to pray or want a fresh look at things? Check it out, you'll probably be surprised how much more you can learn about something that you've been doing for a long time.
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A Praying Life:  Connecting With God In A Distracting World
A Praying Life: Connecting With God In A Distracting World by Paul E. Miller (Paperback - May 29, 2009)
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