Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Preacher, Vol. 7: Salvation Paperback – September 1, 1999


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, September 1, 1999
"Please retry"
$26.21 $8.98

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Preacher (Book 7)
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (September 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563895196
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563895197
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #253,834 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Garth Ennis is my favorite author.
The Good Docta
Salvation ends with a long-awaited confrontation and flashback sequence that set up the series well for what is apparently going to be its concluding storylines.
Howard Whitman
Start with "Gone of Texas (volume 1), because with this series it's highly neccesary to read the collections in order.
Ron Tothleben (tothleben@hotmail.com)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Richmond VINE VOICE on January 16, 2000
Simply astounding that some critics feel this the least of the Preacher story arcs to date! Writer Ennis is still perfectly comfortable writing this incredible character in fascinating, if decadent situations. This time out we get to meet Jesse's delightful and utterly enchanting mother, a creature inspired by the painting of Wyeth. Other new enticements include Cindy, the female deputy sheriff; Lorie, the cyclopean girl with an unexpected perspective on the world; Skeeter, the cuddly mongrel whose loyalty and obedience to Jesse proves to be more than merely a life enhancement; and the entirely despicable Odin Quincannon, whose personal perversion intrigues, while it disgusts. Writing such complex characters at this level of sophistication is no easy feat, but Mr. Ennis does so masterfully. Steve Dillon's art perfectly catches the nuances of the characters and their setting. This is truly a virtuoso performance and truly a grand reading experience. Preacher is not for everyone, certainly; but if you love a superb story well told and are not offended by the seamier side of life, there's little better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sean Connelly (Sean_Connelly@emerson.edu) on September 10, 1999
Preacher is the flagship Vertigo book, and has been ever since the demise of Sandman and the general dropoff of interest in Hellblazer (another book which Ennis and Dillon are responsible for revitalizing. Salvation is no different from the last 6 graphic novels in terms of quality, but it does offer an interesting departure from the books main theological focus. The story of Rev. Jesse Custer taking over the reigns of the law in small town Texas is definetly new territory for Ennis and Dillon. Ennis' writing as usual is above par, as is the fabulous penciling of Mr. Dillon. The addition of Pamela Rambo as the regular colorist has lent a wonderful atmosphere to the art, each panel seeming all the more real for the wonderful color's and extures she lends to the already immaculate pencils of Dillon. In general, a wonderful read if you've been into the series from the start, and works wonderfully as a jumping in point, although I can't suggest enough reading the entire series. Wonderful job, all around.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ron Tothleben (tothleben@hotmail.com) on October 13, 2001
I think this volume is exactly what the series needed. A nice diversion of the things that were going on so far. A little break from the bombastic story it was turning into. But most of all, back to the typical bizarre-humor-action Ennis writing that hasn't been this good since volume 2 (the collection about Jesse's childhood in Angelville).
A little about the story:
After witnessing 'that nasty event' with Cassidy and Tulip (see previous volume "War in the Sun") Jesse turned around and split. He drove into this little in-the-middle-of-nowehere town called "Salvation" and became sherif of it.
There he went to live with Lorie, the sister of his childhood friend Billy-Bob (see volume 2 "Untill the end of the World"), and another woman called Jodie. A woman who will later on in the book turn out to be a lot more than 'just a woman'. Especially for Jesse. The red line in the story is Jesse having his own private war with the local redneck, bigmouthed meatcompany owner. His quest to find God is off for now.
Next to the mentioned things, the gap between 'now' and the moment he fell from the plane gets filled in as well.
There's also another meet-up between Jesse and 'Spaceman', the man who went to Vietnam with Jesse's father. This also makes for another great warstory, Garth Ennis' guilty pleasure.
Next to "Untill the end of the World" this is probably the best collection of the series. It's a little less forced than several of the trades that have gone (shortly) before and Ennis lets himself go to just tell an entertaining story. Some things are uncovered, but never forced. Ennis goes all out putting humor in the clash between Jesse and 'The Meatman'. If you haven't read a Preacher collection yet don't get this though !
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By PiratePrentice on September 27, 1999
Verified Purchase
Salvation is a detour from the main Preacher storyline. That's not necessarily a bad thing. It's just that there is absolutely nothing new here at all. Custer goes to a small texas town and takes care of the bad guys. So what? In the process, Ennis espouses the same old predictable, tired themes...Be nice to misfits and people who look funny...Nazis are bad, bad bad... Black people should be treated as well as white people. Now there's nothing wrong with these ideas, but it's getting old.
Steve Dillon is a good artist, but his limitations in character drawing is really showing. He is utterly unable to draw unique character faces. The one-eyed woman, for example is just a Cycloped Tulip. Everyones' eyes look alike.
It's still one of the best books going, and definitely worth the read. The requisite weidness and violence is all there.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 12, 2000
Out of all 8 of the Preacher collections I truly found this one to be the best. Ennis and Dillon have always been great and though they may have been hard pressed to top War In the Sun, somehow they managed to succeed with a story that brought Reverend Jesse Custer back to his routes. Sure we all love Tulip and Cassidy (well, maybe not so much Cassidy any more) and even though they were abscent from the book, (along with Arseface and Starr) the Salvation storyline was a nice break from main storyline. This book contained all the violence and black humor that Preacher is known for and probably the most twisted villian Ennis has ever come up with. If you are a Preacher fan, this is a must and though the first part of Salvation deviates from the main story line, by the end, you will finally get to find out what happened to Jesse's eye at the end of War in the Sun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?