Start reading Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions [Kindle Edition]

Dan Ariely
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (659 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.99
Kindle Price: $8.58
You Save: $7.41 (46%)
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 65%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.
Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Book Description

"A marvelous book… thought provoking and highly entertaining."
—Jerome Groopman, New York Times bestselling author of How Doctors Think

"Ariely not only gives us a great read; he also makes us much wiser."
—George Akerlof, 2001 Nobel Laureate in Economics

"Revolutionary."
New York Times Book Review

Behavioral economist and New York Times bestselling author Dan Ariely offers a much-needed take on the irrational decisions that led to our current economic crisis.



Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Irrational behavior is a part of human nature, but as MIT professor Ariely has discovered in 20 years of researching behavioral economics, people tend to behave irrationally in a predictable fashion. Drawing on psychology and economics, behavioral economics can show us why cautious people make poor decisions about sex when aroused, why patients get greater relief from a more expensive drug over its cheaper counterpart and why honest people may steal office supplies or communal food, but not money. According to Ariely, our understanding of economics, now based on the assumption of a rational subject, should, in fact, be based on our systematic, unsurprising irrationality. Ariely argues that greater understanding of previously ignored or misunderstood forces (emotions, relativity and social norms) that influence our economic behavior brings a variety of opportunities for reexamining individual motivation and consumer choice, as well as economic and educational policy. Ariely's intelligent, exuberant style and thought-provoking arguments make for a fascinating, eye-opening read. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“This is a wonderful, eye-opening book. Deep, readable, and providing refreshing evidence that there are domains and situations in which material incentives work in unexpected ways. We humans are humans, with qualities that can be destroyed by the introduction of economic gains. A must read!”

Product Details

  • File Size: 743 KB
  • Print Length: 382 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0061353248
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books; 1 Exp Rev edition (June 23, 2009)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002C949KE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,538 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
183 of 192 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
This book and Dan Ariely have recieved a lot of media attention, so I approached the book with some skepticism, thinking that it might be overhyped. I'm pleased to report that my skepticism turned out to be unwarranted.

The book has many strengths, the main one being that it convincingly presents many ways people are wired and/or conditioned to be irrational, usually without even being aware of it. This eye-opening revelation can be a bit disheartening, but the good news is that we can fix at least some of this irrationality by being aware of how it can arise and then making a steady effort to override it or compensate for it. That's not an easy task, but it can be done. As a simple example, I've programmed a realistic exercise schedule into my PDA, and I've been very consistent with my exercise because of that. The PDA imposes a discipline on me which I couldn't otherwise impose on myself (as I know from experience).

The book is also well written, and I would even say enjoyable to read. The many experiments described in the book are presented in a lively way which elicits interest, and Ariely goes into just the right amount of detail -- enough to convey the basic experimental designs, results, and plausible interpretations, without boring the reader by getting into esoteric points which are more appropriate for journal papers.

The one criticism I have of the book, which applies to most of Western pscyhology, is that most of the described experiments used US college students as subjects. That raises a serious question regarding the extent to which the results can be generalized to people of the same age who aren't college students, people of other ages, and people outside the US.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
342 of 374 people found the following review helpful
By Drifty
Format:Hardcover
I have been thinking about economics seriously for nearly 30 years. Classical economics is built to no small degree on the notion that people will generally act in their own best self interest, after rationally and intelligently examining their options. This fit my world view fine in my first career as an engineer (BS and MS in Electrical Engineering).

From my 2nd Career as a Business Development person (MBA), I began to have to deal with people's tendency to not entirely think things through.

Here in this book, we have a professor who runs socioeconomic tests on his MBA students. These students are smart enough, worldly enough, experienced enough, and educated enough to approximate the standard economic assumptions and produce reasonably rational behavior.

Guess what. Even among broad experiments conducted on multiple MBA classes over time, one can predictably pre-bias the outcome of a particular run of a socioeconomic experiment by what seeds you plant in the class members' minds before the experiment. For example, in one experiment in estimating prices, the author requires his students to write the last two digits of their social security numbers on the top of the paper. Simply the act of writing a high number (e.g., 88) versus a low number (e.g., 08) produced statistically significant correlatable influences on the students' later price estimates. Those compelled to write "88" at the top of their papers would reliably estimate higher prices than those compelled to write "08" at the top of their papers, to a statistically significant degree.

Extrapolating to "real life." Watching Fox News will tend to make you more conservative without you knowing it. Watching MSNBC news will tend to make you more liberal without you knowing it.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
279 of 310 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the fuzzy world of being human. February 19, 2008
Format:Hardcover
Dan Ariely is the guy you'd want at your dinner party. He's witty, smart and also very inclusive - sharing his passion for the way humans tick in a way that makes us feel great about the fact that, rational as we like to think we are, we make bad snap decisions, we cheat and we get ruled by our heart precisely when the facts are screaming "go the other way!" There's a lot in this writing which celebrates our human-ness. Why do we do this?
What Ariely has done here is shift a lot of the thinking developed by such pioneers as Kahneman & Tversky who worked in behavioural economics, and moved it into the everyday sphere. And he's done a great, insightful job. Where the behavioural economists are focused on financial decisions (why we buy high and sell low - and confound the assumptions of the classic economists who assume 'the rational man,) Ariely eschews the technical language and walks us through everyday examples of our often fuzzy and quite irrational decision-making.

The result is utterly engaging - and this easy 300 page read still has academic rigour and strong foundations. Ariely cites many experiments and examples, and shows that we often get things wrong because we frame things the wrong way, mis-judge probabilities, apply heuristic rules of thumb that don't always work, or we just plain let our emotions rule.

We love to think that we're educated, rational and moral. Yet who hasn't overestimated the upside on a sure-fire investment, bought some clothing that we knew was a mistake even as we bought it, or got our wires crossed between work-rules and social rules? This book is fascinating, entertaining and very, very illuminating.

- Recommended for the general public, but I'd urge marketers, market researchers and business people to read this one carefully.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars For anyone who wishes to gain a deeper understanding about how we make...
Dan Ariely offers insight about the Human decision making process. I enjoyed the book, and it provided me with new ideas for my students to work on in the SMART Lab. Read more
Published 5 days ago by J. Mirabal
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging and Enlightening
Dan is a fascinating, entertaining and easy to understand speaker and writer. In this amazing book you will learn how the decisions we make may be influenced far more than we... Read more
Published 14 days ago by Dharbour60
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my new favorites
I love these types of books, and this one was great. The author blends both humor and facts together in a way that are a lot of fun to read, so by all means get this book. Read more
Published 16 days ago by Jtown
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good read
A very good and also interesting read that lets you view the world around through a different lens and perspective.
Published 21 days ago by ramzi
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting insight into human nature and how we make decisions.
I think this is a great book about how humans make irrational decisions. It opened my eyes to some of the ways that people think that I had not thought about previously.
Published 1 month ago by TH26
5.0 out of 5 stars Outside the paradigm of economic history
Ariely in his book Predictable Irrationality lends new understanding of the psychological drivers for purchasing. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Stewart Paulson
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, long on anecdotes, short on references
I love this book for so many reasons. It's enlightening to get an inside look at human behavior in everyday transactions. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Best one
It's not that I have read a lot of books, but in terms of quality and relevant information about human behavior and society it was a great experience reading it.
Published 1 month ago by Ricardo Lassalle Soto
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent observations about our irrational behaviors
This book has a great pattern. A hypothesis – followed by an experiment (or multiple) – followed by some explanation, and finally some more lessons that can be drawn from the... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Aniket
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic
Dan Ariely is my new favorite economist. A lot fewer of his "experiments" are backed by traditional lab research, but the examples he uses are easier to understand and more... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Rachel
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Book Extras from the Shelfari Community

(What's this?)

To add, correct, or read more Book Extras for Predictably Irrational , visit Shelfari, an Amazon.com company.


More About the Author

Dan Ariely is the James B Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University.

Dan publishes widely in the leading scholarly journals in economics, psychology, and business. His work has been featured in a variety of media including The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Business 2.0, Scientific American, Science and CNN. He splits his time between Durham NC and the rest of the world



Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category


ARRAY(0xa5824564)