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Preserving Memory: The Struggle to Create America's Holocaust Museum Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press; 1st edition (October 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231124074
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231124072
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #565,763 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Passages in this discussion of the selection of artifacts?children's shoes, leg braces, bundles of women's hair?to be exhibited in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington are harrowing to read. At the same time, the bureaucratic infighting and political tugging on the President's Commission on the Holocaust and its successor, the United States Holocaust Memorial Council, tend to trivialize the raison d'etre of the museum: about what sort of building to erect that would be a "good neighbor" to others on the Mall, about whether to include articles that once belonged to Gypsies and homosexuals who were also victims, about commemorating other genocides like the slaughter of the Armenians in 1915. Ultimately, Linenthal's (Sacred Ground: Americans and Their Battlefields) carefully researched account seeks to answer the vexing question of the "place" of Holocaust memory in American culture. Illustrations not seen by PW.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Linenthal (religion and American culture, Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh) describes the 15-year effort to create a national museum commemorating the Holocaust. He begins with the creation in May 1978 of the President's Commission on the Holocaust during the Carter administration. He then covers issues related to the location, design, and construction of the museum building. Linenthal's most significant contribution is the chapter on defining and representing the horror of the Holocaust. He skillfully describes the dilemmas facing the organizers of the exhibits, such as how to depict the story of mass murder and yet personalize it, how to represent the Nazis and other perpetrators of the Holocaust in the exhibit, and whether non-Jewish victims should be included. Linenthal tells the story of defining and representing America's memory of the Holocaust with sensitivity and thoroughness. For all collections.?Mark Weber, Kent State Univ. Lib., Ohio
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David L. Kupfer on July 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book may appeal to a small audience, but it tells a great story. It describes the lengthy but worthwhile struggle of a group of people doing what seemed impossible at first: building a museum that was in Washington and the present , but about events that took place in Europe in the past. And finding a way to make it relevant and moving to all those seeking inspiration for how to live morally in their world. The writer finds a way to make the struggles come alive, as the Holocaust Commission found a way to create a museum that was Jewish but of value to all visitors, a story of horror that could be at home next to the grassy Mall and marble elegance of Washington DC. It made me want to examine and re-examine every square inch of the museum now that I understood how much love and work had gone into it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Preserving Memory is the story of how the United States Holocaust Museum was made. After reading this book, I'm rather amazed the museum was made at all. On November 1, 1978, President Carter issued Executive Order 12093, creating the President's Commission on the Holocaust. Twelve commissioners were sworn in on February 1, 1979. Thus began the road to the Making of the United States Holocaust Museum. Some of the Commissioners were survivors of the Holocaust. With their background, some of them wanted to be very sure of what they were doing. There were many battles over almost everything to do with the museum. To further complicate things, in dealing with the White House, some things became almost political battles. The museum began to be built in the late 1980's, and was opened in April 1993. This is a great book, but it requires a lot of perseverance to read it. Some of the story tends to bog down, which is why I gave it four stars. Still, if you love history and can stick with it this is a book worth reading. A well written book that explains much about the memory of the Holocaust.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Crossfit Len on January 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
A Highly informative and yet very readable account of the building of the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC and the politics behind it. This is one of those books that by the end you have learned alot.
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0 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Kennedy on September 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I haven't read the book yet, but it arrived as promised and in good condition.
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