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Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars Hardcover – March 25, 2014


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Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars + Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round + Canning for a New Generation: Bold, Fresh Flavors for the Modern Pantry
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Running Press (March 25, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762449683
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762449682
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 6.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,029 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“An essential guide for anyone enrolled in a farm-share, growing a backyard garden, or just looking to extend the life of seasonal produce.”
--The Philadelphia Inquirer

About the Author

Marisa McClellan is a full-time writer, teacher, and blogger at Food in Jars (three times nominated by Saveur magazine for a Best Food Blog award, and winner of Best of Philly from Philadelphia Magazine). Her writing appears on The Food Network blog, Saveur.com, and Food52.com. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband. Visit her at foodinjars.com.

More About the Author

Marisa McClellan is a food writer, canning teacher, and dedicated farmers' market shopper who lives in Center City Philadelphia with her husband Scott McNulty. She's the author of the blog Food in Jars and spends most of her days cooking up jams, fruit butters and pickles in her 80 square foot kitchen. Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches All Year Long is her very first cookbook.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Great recipes, easy to follow, fun read!
Karen Morss
I shouldn't have worried, because this book is chock full of new offerings that are fun and different, and promise a great season of canning and preserving.
Rookiecookie
I love that this book has recipes and instructions on small batch canning.
Jessica McCormick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Joanne on April 3, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I am new to canning and have acquired about 8 or so books of recipes and such already. This was my latest acquisition. I just made Raspberry Habanero Jam using up some our last summer's bounty of frozen berries. My son had habaneros from his garden we also froze whole. The recipe makes 2 half-pint jars from 1 1/2 lbs of berries and one habanero to infuse the berries while heating. It was to be left in there the whole time but I took it out after 5 mins to my taste. The recipe was very easy and sealed right away. I didn't think I would like to make any jam/jelly that didn't use purchased pectin, bc some recipes I have seen w/o pectin were too time-consuming, using cut up green apples, seeds, etc., as a natural pectin source. I have too many other food projects taking up my time to do that. Marisa's jam recipes ALL exclude pectin too, but with no need to mess around with apples. This recipe used sugar (1 1/2 cups) and a bit of lemon juice, that's it. It worked up in the pan in 15 mins, simple occasional stirring. You determine it's done 'by eye,' not by freezing a plate and putting a drop of fruit on it. If you see a 'trail' after running a spatula in the pan of hot berry mix, you pretty much are done. I love recipes like this. This week I made a 'spicy mango salsa' using about 3 small diced Ataulfo mangos, a small diced red pepper, cider vinegar, brown sugar, shallot, etc...it all goes into the pot at once. Simmer 5 mins or so to reduce liquid. It makes 3 half-pint jars. I will be serving that with a pork tenderloin soon! I just yesterday made Carrot Relish (the Easter Bunny is coming soon), and that made 3 half-pint jars. Uses shredded carrots, red pepper, onion, vinegar, sugar, some spices, etc...easy. Add solids to the liquids, simmer a few minutes. Done.Read more ›
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Rookiecookie on March 27, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a long time reader of Marisa's blog, Food in Jars, I knew that her book was coming out in the spring. I wasn't certain if there would be anything offered that hadn't already been posted in her blog. I shouldn't have worried, because this book is chock full of new offerings that are fun and different, and promise a great season of canning and preserving. One of the greatest features of Marisa's book is that these recipes do not require a huge outlay of cash for massive quantities of ingredients or huge blocks of time to process. This artisanal approach to preserving should go a long way to attract more people to a rewarding and satisfying past time. Great job, Marisa!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By M. Hill TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover
As an experienced canner I have become skeptical, if not outright alarmed by a number of the recent books on canning that dismiss safety precautions as something unnecessary and old fashioned, when in fact they represent modern methods established to eliminate potential dangers - an improvement of methods that our great great grandmothers used. No point wasting time and money or possibly putting our friends and loved ones at risk. If just starting out or in doubt, check with your county extension service which usually provides safety information and canning information/recipes at no cost designed for the part of the country in which you reside.

Being safe does not have to be complicated and this book is a perfect example of clear, straightforward instructions that incorporate proper safety methods. I would add that before use jars first be washed, either in the dishwasher or by hand, as an initial step although sitting in hot water would probably take care of most issues.

Instructions on how to properly preserve food are a necessity and, in this book, done as painlessly as possible, but the fun part are the recipes, and this is where the book truly shines. The author has taken some usual canning recipes and re-invented them. If you look at enough canning books you see many of the same recipes presented almost in identical form over and over again. Corn relish recipe, dilly beans and peach jam are just a few and granted are a good starting point, but now I want more complex flavors than those I was satisfied with when I began canning.

This book is the perfect example of why I keep searching out new recipes -- the author has created interesting combinations like Salted Brown Sugar Peach Jam, Pear Jam with Chocolate and even Pickled Nectarine slices.
Read more ›
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Linda H, Birmingham on March 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For someone, such as myself in particular, who has always been fearful of attempting a canning experiment, this is just the book to get you started. It contains detailed instructions about the equipment needed, outlines how-to recipes, and these are designed for small batches. It takes the fear out of taking on a large project and failing. I still do not think I am ready to tackle a large food canning project, but with this book it will give me confidence for what I can do in the future. It is a great instruction that I never learned in Home Ec class. Thank you, Marisa, from Food in Jars!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Ki on April 14, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love this book. I started canning maybe about eight years ago, starting with the requisite strawberry jam. It was fantastic, but who really wants eight pints of strawberry jam? We live in an age when most of us are no longer feeding large families. And, even though I have a backyard garden, I am unlikely to grow enough of any one thing to need to preserve on that scale. But, I want to be able to pick up produce from the farmer's market and lay in by, particularly to have something interesting and locally-based for the barren winter months.

One of the big challenges of canning is that, barring tomatoes, dill pickles, and jams, a lot of recipes for preserves ended up less appealing that whatever you could buy shipped in from the grocery store. So, a lot of work goes to waste. This book, the perfect follow-up to Food in Jars, starts to change that. It's preserves that you're actually going to want to dive into, mid-winter.

So far, given it is just the beginning of the growing season, the only thing I have tried is the rhubarb chutney. This has been such a huge hit that I am going to have to make another batch. My pickiest friend devoured it at dinner last night! If I never made another recipe out this book, this chutney is worth the price of the book. Next, pickled asparagus!
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