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Who Wants to Be a Millionaire


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  • ABC-licensed board game version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire
  • The box contains 1,000 game cards, 5 question-and-answer card consoles, lifeline tokens, instructions, and plenty of fake money
  • For 2-5 players
67 new from $9.95 19 used from $3.51 65 collectible from $1.99

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Product Information

Technical Details
Brand NamePressman Toy
Item Weight0.3 ounces
Product Dimensions14 x 10.5 x 3.1 inches
Item model number5000
Material Typeplastic and cardboard
Manufacturer Part Number5000
  
Additional Information
ASINB00004DTNF
Best Sellers Rank #68,503 in Office Products (See top 100)
Shipping Weight4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
Date First AvailableDecember 13, 2006
  
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WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.


Product Description

Amazon.com

Now you can finally prove that all that prize money Regis Philbin gives away is rightfully yours--and you can do it in the comfort of your own home, thanks to the official, ABC-licensed board game version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. Faithful to the TV show, this board game gets all the details just right--from the Lifelines to those laughably easy $100 questions. Players take turns filling in as Regis, quizzing each other from nearly 2,000 questions. As the prize money keeps doubling, someone's inevitably going to get stuck--and that's where the Lifelines come in: Phone-a-Friend (either a fellow player or an actual phone call); Ask the Audience (your fellow players); or ask to see the 50:50 option (cards slip into a plastic console that lets the host cover up a couple incorrect answers). The first one to win that ever-elusive million dollars is the champion. The box contains 1,000 game cards, five question-and-answer card consoles, Lifeline tokens, instructions, and plenty of fake money. Gather family and friends (two to five people can play) and start up a game of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire--you might never watch TV again. --Paul Hughes

Product Description

Now you can experience the excitement of trying to become a millionaire, just the way it's done on TV's hottest game show! Who Wants to be a Millionaire Board Game gives each player a chance to play host while the others try to win more and more money by answering entertaining and challenging questions. Stuck for an answer? Use the same lifelines they do on TV. You can even phone a friend for the correct answer! The player who becomes a millionaire or ends up with the most money wins! For 2 to 5 players, ages 12 to adult. Made in USA.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Over-all it is a fun game and really brought our somewhat distant family together.
Heather
The lifelines differ from the show slightly, but are designed such that a player will never necessarily get screwed over by someone with bad intentions.
The Banker's Nephew
This game is okay if you have a group of 5-6 people, but if you have four or less, it can be a little difficult to use lifelines.
"milaskopa"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

79 of 81 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 2, 2000
It is great! It has almost 2000 questions (20 times more than the PC game), and you can take turns being the host! The game is enough fun for the whole family. Highly recommended. Hopefully, they will sell question additions later in the year.
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 26, 2000
A friend brought this over to our house one get-together evening, we had so much fun, he ended up leaving it for us. Not only did we learn from the questions, it gave my husband a chance to do his oh so funny (so he thinks) Regis impression. Of course in this version, even Regis plays!
Since then we have regularly added our own little playful additions, such as a red plastic phone for those all important call-a-friend moments, we play teams and count on our own for asking the "audience", and some of us get a kick out of humming, (one friend uses a kazoo), to supply the music!
This is a great game for non-serious adult fun. The CD-Rom version is terrific too--but we like the old-fashioned interaction that friends can have with a board game.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 2000
I always find it interesting looking through the past reviews. I think my favorite was the person who said that they didn't like it because the ways of doing the Ask the Audience and Phone A Friend lifelines was too difficult to figure out, and that the game lacked drama because the money wasn't real.
Jeez.
The two aforementioned Lifelines are done in a very creative way; everyone or just one person (depending on the Lifeline of choice) secretly votes on what answer they think is correct. The host then checks the real answer and throws in the corresponding vote card, so at least one response is correct. It's an excellent way to simulate an audience of a couple hundred that is *almost* always right, and the nagging fear that the person on the other end of the phone line isn't too sure about their answer. Of course, you're also competing against the people who are supposed to be helping you, so consider how devious the group is before deciding if that's going to be your final answer. As for the game lacking drama due to the lack of real money... you must be kidding. It sounds like this person was expecting enough real cash stuffed in the game box to actually play at home, yet still have the game cost about 30 dollars.
OK back to your regularly scheduled review... This is one of the most impressively done games I have seen in a long time, almost rivaling the quality of imported German games. There are plenty of questions in the box; you won't start repeating anything but the sub-1,000 questions for a long time. The new method of play, with up to 4 people facing off while the host does the questioning, is ingenious.
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83 of 90 people found the following review helpful By tropic_of_criticism on August 6, 2000
This version of Millionaire-At-Home works both better and worse than its CD-ROM counterpart. It's definitely better than even the CD Second Edition in terms of the number, variety, and level-appropriateness of questions. The questions much more closely approximate those on the television series than either of the two CD-ROMs. And the Phone-a-Friend lifeline is much closer to the show in that you actually CAN phone a friend, unlike on the CD-ROM.
Where the board game fails is in the implementation of the other lifelines and in its dumbfounding lack of music.
The 50/50 doesn't particularly work. On the show, it's effective because Regis himself has no control over anything, and because the player's ramblings appear to determine which responses are pulled. Here, the person playing host potentially has too much leeway in deciding which choices will be nixed. To be fair, the CD-ROM isn't much better at capturing the actual feel of this lifeline, either--its throwaways are predetermined by code--but its approximation is at least fairer.
Similarly, the Poll-the-Audience option fails miserably. Instead of being a more-or-less sure bet, this lifeline depends entirely on the benevolence of the people you're playing against. There's no "audience" in this game, because everyone's a player. It's in their interest to mislead the person currently in the hot seat. Consequently, you'll likely get the wrong answer if you choose this lifeline-which goes against everything we learn from watching the show.
But the biggest drawback of this edition is the lack of music. The show is entirely built around the music. Without music, Millionaire is nothing special. The music is the origin of 90% of the drama.
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41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 11, 2000
I love the show and watch it all the time. I was really excited when I saw it was coming out as a board game. But I was sadly disapointed by this game. It does not even come close to the feeling of the TV game. It plays very slow. The person who plays the host, or even if you rotate every question is constantly putting cards away and pulling new ones out of the box and putting them in their plastic card holder and passing out money..... This really slowed down the game. And if you play with four people you have to go around and ask everyone if they have there final answer and if they need to use a life line it doesn't really work well. Other then the 50/50 the other two life lines do not work. We were not sure how we should poll the audience because we where playing aginst everyone in the room? And phone a friend works the same way. We tried every way possiable to modify this game to "make it work". We tried teams, one person at a time, change all the life lines to 50/50, but it never really gives you the feel of the show. I think this game was rushed in development. If you must have it, get it. The questions are fine, but if you want something fun I would save your money and play Trivial Pursuit until something better comes along.
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