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Presumed Innocent Mass Market Paperback – April 5, 2011


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; Reprint edition (April 5, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1455500402
  • ISBN-13: 978-1455500406
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 4.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (215 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #820,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Chicago defense attorney Turow, formerly a U.S. prosecutor, capitalizes on his intimate knowledge of the courtroom in an impressive first novel that matches Anatomy of a Murder in its intensity and verisimilitude. With the calculating genius of a good lawyer (and writer), Turow, author of the nonfiction One L, draws the reader into a grittily realistic portrait of big city political corruption that climaxes with a dramatic murder trial in which every dark twist of legal statute and human nature is convincingly revealed. The novel's present tense puts the reader firmly in the mind of narrator Rusty Sabich, a married prosecuting attorney whose affair with a colleague comes back to haunt him after she is brutally raped and murdered. Sabich's professional and personal lives begin to mingle painfully when he becomes the accused. His is a gripping and provocative dilemma: "Sitting in court, I actually forget who is on trial at certain moments. . . . And once we get back to the office, I can be a lawyer again, attacking the books, making notes and memos." Turow's ability to forge the reader's identification with the protagonist, his insightful characterizations of Sabich's legal colleagues and the overwhelming sense he conveys of being present in the courtroom are his most brilliant and satisfying contributions to what may become a literary crime classic. 125,000 first printing; $125,000 ad/promo; movie rights to Sidney Pollack; Literary Guild dual selection; author tour.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Spellbinding...The suspense is relentless...Surprise follows surprise...The work of a profoundly gifted writer"—The New York Times --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

More About the Author

Scott Turow was born in Chicago in 1949. He graduated with high honors from Amherst College in 1970, receiving a fellowship to Stanford University Creative Writing Center which he attended from 1970 to 1972. From 1972 to 1975 Turow taught creative writing at Stanford. In 1975, he entered Harvard Law School, graduating with honors in 1978. From 1978 to 1986, he was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago, serving as lead prosecutor in several high-visibility federal trials investigating corruption in the Illinois judiciary. In 1995, in a major pro bono legal effort he won a reversal in the murder conviction of a man who had spent 11 years in prison, many of them on death row, for a crime another man confessed to.

Today, he is a partner in the Chicago office of Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal an international law firm, where his practice centers on white-collar criminal litigation and involves representation of individuals and companies in all phases of criminal matters. Turow lives outside Chicago

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 24, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I still pick up my battered paperback copy of "Presumed Innocent" from time to time and reread my favorite scenes, which probably speaks to the worth of Scott Turow's novel as much as anything. But ultimately I think the strength of this novel is that it works well on both parts of the law & order equation, that is to say, both in the courtroom in terms of the legal drama as well as outside where the detective elements come into play. At heart "Presumed Innocent" is a basic horror story, about a man who may be convicted for a crime he did not do. However, the twist here is that we are not sure if we believe our narrator, Rusty Sabich, once the fair-haired chief deputy prosecutor in the Kindle County D.A.'s office.
Rusty Sabich's boss, Raymond Horgan, is in a dogfight for the election with Nico Della Guardia, a former lieutenant. When one of their colleagues, Carolyn Polhemus, is found brutally murdered, Horgan gives Sabich the job. What Horgan does not know is that Sabich and Polhemus had been involved in an affair, which ended badly. Only Sabich's wife, Barbara, knows about the affair, and she has as much trouble dealing with her husband's obsession over the dead woman as she did with the affair. Sabich begins the investigation but there are no suspects, no leads, and no hope of finding the killer. But when Horgan loses the election, Sabich is stunned to find himself the new administrations one and only suspect for the Polhemus murder.
The fact that Sabich was a prosecutor becomes a key part of the legal dilemma in which our narrator finds himself.
Read more ›
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 19, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having seen the movie a long time ago, and having read a couple of Turows later books, I was very pleasantly surprised that not only did I not feel I ruined the book by knowing how it all turned out I also felt that this book was his strongest story.
Intrigue, romance, lies, betrayal, sex, murder, powerful attorney's and a story with twists and turns, this is a must read for any that are interested in the genre and haven't gotten around to reading it yet. Turow is a master at writing dialogue, it seems to flow naturally off the page and it makes all the characters believable and either likable, dislikable or downright hated.
I would certainly recommend reading this before seeing the movie if I had my choice, but don't skip it even if you already know the ending. The writing here is just plain excellent and I give this one a very strong recommendation.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amy E. Latta on February 16, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just finished this book last night, at 2:30 am, less than four hours before I have to get up to go to work. It's that good. It took me two days to read the first third, and one day to read that last two-thirds....I could not put this book down. At the end, I felt like, I should have guessed who the murderer was, but I never had a clue. I even had to re-read the pages over again to make sure that what I was reading was real. Amazing how I, in the end, felt sadness for people I had loathed the whole time and then felt compulsions for people I originally felt sorry for. Nothing is as it seems and everyone is suspect. There were times when I actually laughed out loud at something a character said, and then felt like crying over some other scene. The words and characters just lept from the page.
It pains me to hear everyone say that this is the best of this kind, since I am just now returning to reading mysteries after years of "not having enough time." I want more! Please tell me that there are other books this exciting out there, because anything less will be too disappointing!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "pmaha" on February 5, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just read a review on this site that made me wonder if that reviewer and I had read the same book. Her obvious disappointment with the characters and plot was sad to read. "Presumed Innocent" was a fascinating read I thought. Rusty Sabich is accused of murdering his colleague and, unbeknownst to his accusers, his ex-lover. He tells his own story, and if Scott Turow is a lawyer first, his career as a writer must follow a very close second. First person narrators are barely to be believed if they are telling their own stories. The fragmented technique used by Turow to tell Rusty's story has two vital uses. First, it reflects the state of his mind: he narrates in vivid flashback and in first person present. Rusty is a fragmented man himself. He is emotionally fragile and is being pounded on by elements he feels he cannot control. Rusty believes that he was in love with the dead woman and for the kind of man that he unfolds into being, this is not at all difficult to accept. He makes himself out to be quite dispassionate, but all his actions reveal that he is very passionate and needs to be around people who are as well. Watch out for storytellers who are promising to be objective and truthful. They rarely ever are and more lie in what they say about situations and others than in what they say about themselves directly. Also, this is a wonderful technique to leave the reader wanting more. Turow does not protect his reader from harsh realities in the world of a prosecuting attorney: rape, murder and violent acts. The seemingly large number of characters do not detract from Rusty's story, as they all have their roles to play in the telling.Read more ›
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