Customer Reviews


71 Reviews
5 star:
 (35)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (14)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


115 of 127 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An important book
Like one of the other reviewers here on Amazon, I am an intelligence analyst for the US government. Unlike that reviewer, I personally witnessed how the Bush administration fabricated, twisted, distorted, "cherry-picked" and otherwise misused intelligence to justify the war in Iraq. Many of us on the inside pretty much knew that this war was already a done...
Published on July 3, 2004

versus
12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Poorly written, but the info. is compelling
First, I must say that many of the reviewers are correct about certain recurring weaknesses throughout this book. The book is poorly organized, repetetive and lacks focus. Yet the final part of the book ("Deception") does a decent job of collecting some of the frighteningly hollow evidence that was used to make a case for war in Iraq.

Whether or not you agree...
Published on November 30, 2004 by Christopher P. Kelly


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

115 of 127 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An important book, July 3, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
Like one of the other reviewers here on Amazon, I am an intelligence analyst for the US government. Unlike that reviewer, I personally witnessed how the Bush administration fabricated, twisted, distorted, "cherry-picked" and otherwise misused intelligence to justify the war in Iraq. Many of us on the inside pretty much knew that this war was already a done deal more than a year before it actually happened - Final decisions technically may not have been made, but it was obvious from observing what went on on a day-to-day basis that the war was going to happen. If it had not been for Colin Powell, it probably would have happened much earlier. It was my personal experience in the run-up to this war that led me to read Bamford's book. I was curious to see how right he would get it. In the end, I feel he did a decent job. He has gathered good information, and he has been fairly thorough.
The only issues I really had with the book were that it seemed to meander or repeat itself in parts - a slight lack of organization, at least when you hold the body of the book up to his thesis - that we went to war in Iraq based on a pretext. I also was a little bored, personally, with the first two-thirds of the book, dealing with the events surrounding 9/11. Not that he didn't have good information there or that it wasn't well written, it just wasn't the reason I picked up the book. I was expecting more Iraq, less 9/11. I also felt that Bamford could have gone into more detail on the myriad of reasons that the administration actually had for invading Iraq. As Paul Wolfowitz acknowledged after the war, WMD was simply the easiest one for all the decision makers at the NSC to agree on. I also think Bamford gave a little too much credence to the idea that the President was motivated by the earlier Iraqi assassination attempt on his family.
I have seen reviews saying that Bamford approaches anti-semitism in his discussion of neoconservative ties to Israel and the question of Israeli pressure on the US to go to war. What Bamford presents here, however, are facts. It is a fact that many neoconservatives who are now in government have, previously, worked for organizations that basically put them on Israel's payroll. Many have worked for Israel-sponsored groups lobbying the US government on behalf of Israel. They have pushed to sway US foreign policy in directions that are very pro-Israel and very anti-Palestinian. It is clear that these individuals have Israel's interests at heart. What is not clear to me is whether they have the same loyalty to the United States. The Israeli government was also very enthusiastic for the Bush administration to go to war against Iraq, and was very emphatic in urging us not to delay the invasion. They also contributed at least some of the bad intelligence which helped support the administrations's push for war. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon was publicly quoted (in the Israeli press) before the war as saying he intended to talk to President Bush and request that we move on to deal with Iran and Syria once we were done with Iraq. It is a fact that some US troops on the ground in Iraq, toward the "end" of the initial fighting, were under the impression that they would be moved to the Iranian border in preparation to invade Iran. In the end, it is a fact that our invasion of Iraq was more clearly in Israel's national security interests than it was ours.
Is this a "Bush-bashing" book? No. The author presents the facts, and the President just doesn't come off looking very good. Sorry about that, but the truth hurts sometimes. The President may not have been the one that made a conscious decision to mislead the American public, but it happened on his watch, and he bears the ultimate responsibility for it. He is not the only one responsible, of course. Many in the upper level of the intelligence community simply rolled over and let this happen. And then of course there's the case of Ahmed Chalabi and friends, who knowingly fed false information to US intelligence in order to manipulate US foreign policy. This war was a result of poor leadership, bad intentions and sloppy intelligence work.
What I find particularly disturbing are the reviews here on Amazon who pan this book not for its substance but its politics. These reviewers display the typical knee-jerk defensive reaction of the right (I'm an independent, just for the record) in attacking the author's politics instead of attempting to refute his arguments.
Read the book and form your own opinions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


126 of 142 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The one book to read if only one, not a substitute for many, June 27, 2004
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
I know Jim Bamford personally, and consider him to be one of the most capable of researchers and most objective of writers on intelligence matters. His deep personal relationships across the U.S. Intelligence Community make him the best possible reporter.
For those of us steeped in the literature, that routinely read both the daily reporting and the regular books, much of what Jim has put together here will be repetitive. This is, however, the very best book to read if you only have the time for one book on the topic of 9-11, the failure of U.S. intelligence, and the corruption of U.S. policy in using 9-11 as a pretext for invading Iraq and giving Bin Laden the best possible (i.e. most stupid) strategic response to 9-11.
This is the ideal book for any citizen who wants a professional "once over" tour of the various intelligence and policy pieces that broke down and allowed 9-11 to happen, and then allowed the entire "balance of powers" construct from our Founding Fathers to fly out the window. If you want to go deeper, see my thirteen Lists and 479+ other reviews of national security non-fiction.
The book is especially strong on the Rendon Group being used to illegally propagandize American citizens with U.S. taxpayer funds, on the abject failure of George Tenet in revitalizing U.S. clandestine operations, on the failure (treated more kindly) of Mike Hayden to bring the National Security Agency into the 21st Century, and on the very unhealthy merger of the U.S. neoconservatives that captured the White House, and well-funded Zionists in both America and Israel who essentially bought themselves an invasion of Iraq--a remarkable coincidence of interests: Jews paying to invade Iraq, Iranians using Chalabi to feed lies to the neo-cons so they would be deceived into thinking Iraq would be a cake-walk, and Bin Laden never daring to dream the entire U.S. population and all arms of government--including a passive media--would "sleep walk" into what this book suggests is one of the dumbest and most costly strategic errors in the national security history of the USA.
This book is not, despite some of the ideologically-motivated reviews below, an attack of George Bush Junior, as much as it is an appalled and informed review of how a complex government collapsed in the face of 9-11, and a handful of ostensibly patriotic and very myopic individuals were able to abuse their personal power because all of the professional counter-forces: the diplomats, the spies, the military professionals, the Congress, the media--every single one was not sufficiently competent nor sufficiently motivated to mandate a more balanced policy process that could understand the many global threats (terrorism and Iraq are actually two of the lesser ones), devise a comprehensive long-term strategy, and execute that strategy using *all* of the instruments of national power, including strong global alliances that lead all governments to fight all gangs in the most effective fashion possible.
We let kids play with matches, and they burned down the house.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


108 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An American horror story, June 8, 2004
Lest we forget, the first 60 pages of A Pretext for War give a harrowing replay of the hijackings of 9/11, as seen first from the Air National Guard's Northeast Air Defense Sector, tracking the planes on radar as they pursue their deadly course. The personal details, conversations and horror-struck impressions are a reminder of the shock felt by all caught in the glare of this monstrous enterprise.

During the attacks on the World Trade Towers, President Bush remained in the classroom photo-op in Florida and General Myers, the acting military commander, spent forty-five minutes in the office of Senator Max Cleland, interviewing for the position of top brass in Cent Com, unaware that the worst attack in this country's history was occurring. The extent of our lack of preparation is shocking at this point, inexplicable. The missing third plane was not yet located. One hundred and ten minutes after takeoff, the forth plane, American Flight 11, came to a fiery end and the attacks were over at last.

In the meat of the book, Bamford covers the spy apparatus in this country, from the Cold War efforts of the NSA to George Tenet's meteoric rise as the head of the CIA during the Clinton Administration and the importance of Presidential Daily Briefings. Piece by piece, Bamford builds a solid structure of information, moving toward his conclusion: we are not much better off now, two years later, in the area of surveillance in other countries. Then he segues into the parallel growth of Osama bin Ladin's efforts to establish an anti-American legion of American fighters, in spite of active interference by Saudi Arabia and the freezing of bin Ladin's assets. Critical to his cause is the continuing support of America for Israel's treatment of the Palestinians. The May 1996 Israeli "Grapes of Wrath" Invasion of Lebanon and the massacre at Qana gave bin Ladin his battle cry, but the incident was barely covered by the American press.

This book addresses certain specific issues that are pertinent to the direction of the country since the Iraq War, namely the current condition of our government agencies: CIA, DIA, FBI, NSA, etc., and whether they have incorporated the drastic changes necessary since the end of the Cold War. Some of the topics covered, thoroughly, I might add, are: manufactured intelligence in pursuit of a vote for war in Iraq, bypassing Congressional oversight of major policy decisions, Chalabi's part in supplying information and the money he received for that information, the Niger uranium connection, the pro-Israeli Neo-Cons, Bush's connection with Sharon, and redrawing the geopolitical map of the Middle East.

The COG, or Continuity of Government, has existed since its inception during the Eisenhower Administration. In its current form, a decision was reached not to reconstitute Congress, but to operate without this branch of government. A critical element in the balance of power, Congress is excised from the shadow government, including those next in line for succession, Majority Leader Dennis Hastert and President pro-tem Robert Byrd. Within a few hours after the decision, senior officials quietly disappeared from Washington, turning up in selected "doomsday" sites in Virginia and Pennsylvania.

After carefully reading Bamford's A Pretext for War, my main concern is the balance of power between the branches of government. Without Congressional oversight, there is no release of public information and no control of abuses that may arise. There is still a credibility gap in terms of what public information is accessible. The condition of our intelligence gathering agencies is critical and if they have been inept or remiss, these problems must be faced, even if the agencies are exposed to public scrutiny. As well, the continuing lack of Congressional oversight is troubling.

Bamford doesn't pull any punches in his assessment of the problems facing America in the current state of crisis. After reading Woodward's Plan of Attack and Dean's Worse Than Watergate, I am even more concerned about the state of our nation and the lack of transparency in the current administration. In addition, Richard Clarke and Paul O'Neill's assertions make more sense when viewed in context with all the information recently published. Certainly, 9/11 permanently changed our world, but the blanket use of discretionary powers to protect us from the terrorists has created a host of other issues that must be discussed and exposed to the light of day and the democratic process. Luan Gaines/2004.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars INDICTED: the Bush Gang, the Neocons, the CIA and NSA, June 21, 2004
By 
Autonomeus (a world ruled by fossil fuels and fossil minds) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
Bamford's "A Pretext for War" is a solid indictment of the Bush Administration's lies. I find it hard to imagine that anyone who actually reads it would vote for Bush this November.

The title of the book is somewhat misleading in that the longest section is not on Iraq, but rather on 9/11 and the failure of the intelligence agencies. There is not a lot new here for anyone who's been paying attention, and especially with the official investigation now reaching a conclusion, but it's still invaluable documentation. Bamford's coverage of the CIA's "Alec Station," which focused exclusively on Osama bin Laden (UBL) after the Kenya bombing of 1998, is shorter than Coll's in "Ghost Wars" (see my review), and is more critical. Bamford seems to side with the FBI against the CIA, criticizing the UBL unit for focusing on paramilitary covert operations, none of which came to fruition, and not systematically gathering intelligence. This led directly to 9/11 when the CIA failed to notify the FBI when some of the future 9/11 operatives entered the U.S. Another group of 9/11 operatives lived just miles from the NSA HQ in Laurel, Maryland and used internet chat groups in Kinko's to communicate with Atta, the 9/11 plot leader!

This leads to Bamford's indictment of the intellligence agencies:

1) The NSA is no longer effective with the rise of the internet, the widespread use of encryption, and the rise of transnational networks instead of centralized governments as the enemies.

2) The CIA is no longer effective, partly because it was shaped by fighting the USSR, and has not adapted to the new threat environment, but mainly because it has no HUMINT -- human intelligence. Bamford makes the point that John Walker Lindh managed to join Al Qaeda, but the CIA has had absolutely noone inside it or any other Islamic terrorist groups.

Pages 283-381, the chapter called "War Room", is the most important part of the book, the part focusing on the systematic abuse of intelligence that created the pretext for the invasion and occupation of Iraq. This story too has been told before (notably in "The Lie Factory" in Mother Jones), but is conveyed here at length in an accessible form. As Richard Clarke emphasized, Rumsfeld, Cheney & the Bush NSC focused on Iraq immediately after 9/11, despite the lack of evidence. As Rumsfeld said (in transcribed meeting notes): "get best info fast; judge whether good enough to hit S.H. at same time. Not only UBL. Go massive. Sweep it all up. Things related, and not."

Then unfolds the story, grounds for impeachment, of the creation of the Office of Special Plans in the Pentagon, manufacturing bogus intelligence, much of it from Chalabi & the INC, to do an end run around the CIA & State Department. Douglas Feith, David Wurmser & Abram Shulsky were the operatives who ran this op, reporting to Wolfowitz & Rumsfeld at the DOD, Libby & Cheney in the White House, and Perle's neocon advisory group. This led to the creation of the WHIG (White House Iraq Group) in August 2002 which led the selling of a war on Iraq to the American people and the world. Bamford dissects and exposes every detail of the lies, from Niger uranium to aluminum tubes, etc, etc, and also reveals an interesting detail most Americans don't know -- there was a parallel disinformation effort in Israel, and in March of 2004 there was a Knesset investigation which found that as in the U.S., the pretext for the war on Iraq, WMD, was all based on speculation, and not on facts.

The final part of the book turns again to the failings of the CIA and NSA. The CIA under Tenet caved to political pressure and failed to oppose the OSP/neocon lies. The NSA shamelessly spied on Blix, the U.N. and U.S. allies in order to gain intel to sway their U.N. votes.

An important fact is noted more than once by Bamford, a fact that I doubt many Americans are aware of -- the CIA only controls 15% of the "U.S. Intelligence Community." The DOD controls the other 85%, including the NSA (National Security Agency, charge of computer SIGINT), the NRO (National Reconnaissance Office, in charge of spy satellites) and the DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency). So if intelligence is going to be reformed, and heads are going to roll, it's not enough to replace Tenet, responsible for 15% of the problem -- Rumsfeld's 85% responsibility head should roll too.

Regime change this November!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


40 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a riveting and disturbing read, June 11, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
bamford provides a riveting and gravely disturbing picture
of how ideology blinkers the critical evaluation of the world
as it is and leads to the propagandistic abuse of a trusting populace. this is, of course, a general theme with reliably anti-democratic consequences for every politically and theologically monolithic ideology. it happens that america is presently experiencing the predictably unhappy consequences of ideological leadership, so it is a story of american opportunities missed and american lives imperilled (to terrorism
and war in iraq) because of the adoption and craftily calculated propagation of the neo-conservative agenda by the present administration. this book is, among things, a compendium of detail for those who doubt the reach and effect of this ideology. it also provides enormous insight into american intelligence gathering communities with respect to their own intrisic,
historical failings as well as to how these failings have been compounded by bush administration desires and policies.
those who were confronted with a moral dilemma concerning how to explain clinton's wagging finger and televised lies about his sexual dilliance(s) to their children, should be absolutely stupified by the task of explaining to a new generation the catalogue of orchestrated talking-points recited by dozens of people in the bush adminstration who wittingly led americans to sacrifice their children and the lives of others in a war
known to insiders to be indefensible on the basis of evidence, but declared all the same, because its adherents sincerely believed it was necessary, despite all credible evidence. if this is not frightening, then you're probably incapable of being scared. if this book doesn't encourage you to re-evaluate your support for the present adminstration, as have numerous lifelong republicans in the intelligence community, then the administration's propaganda as described by bampton has no better example of its success. i'm sure that administration apologists will trash this book (after all, they are ideologues), as they've done to many recent investigative books, but don't let them discourage you from a captivating and mind-opening read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Objective and deeply troubling, June 17, 2004
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
This is a very important book which makes clear precisely how and why we are bogged down in Iraq. Contrary to what some of the other reviewers have written, the book is not anti-Bush or (getting really ridiculous) anti-semitic. Bamford is a fine historian/journalist who describes the public officials responsible for leading Bush to a war he would not have chosen if he had the facts. But he didn't have them because certain officials cooked them to suit their own agendas. This needs to be exposed and Bamford does it in a cool, moderate tone with ample back-up. Call names if you will. But read this book, and learn.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


34 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This tops all the recent books, June 15, 2004
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
Much better than "Plan of Attack" and "Against All Enemies", etc. You want the truth?" Bamford has the courage to tell the part of the story that no one else will. We should all be able to handle the truth now and wake up to who pushed us into this Iraq mess and why. Soldiers and civilians are dying for this "elite" group. They should be brought to justice for their lies and deceptions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


32 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book will be a reference work for American history., June 18, 2004
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
The Bamford book is huge in it's ramifications. He is a careful analyst, and a good structuralist in his writing. I happen to believe his research, but I am not overly uncritical if I need to be. I strongly recommend this book, and that is on the basis that is is packed with vital, need-to-know information that Americans deserve to have.
Ross Bartlett from El Cajon, California, seemed oddly dissonant in his review. I therefore went over to his review listings for a surf. Well, well: turns out Ross doesn't "read" all the books he reviews. I strongly suspect that he uses the Amazon 'preview' feature to skim a page or two.. I note from his list of "reviewed" books that he is a tireless troll working for the Hard Right - I call these ugly Americans 'Psycho-patriots', because they are mindless about their dogma.
Dear old Ross, a man fossilized in time and in belief (he seems to be a (heh heh) *Mormon*.... is using Amazon review priviledges to uncritically slam books he may not even have read - how much one considers this an indictment of the rabid Right Wing in American politics is up to you - I think it's pathetic.
Ross, do please mail me hbalfour@optushome.com.au and get a bigger serve of what you obviously need.
Buy the book, learn how deeply you have been betrayed by your government. Lend the book to others. Get angry, then take action.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing, Simply Disturbing, June 30, 2004
By 
Robert M. Logan (Folsom, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
Despite the weighty subject, this book reads like a novel. Some reviewers pan it as a work of fiction. You owe it to yourself to read this book and decide for yourself.
James Bamford asserts that the current Bush administration commenced its service with an agenda to topple Saddam Hussein, end involvement in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and rearrange the dominoes in the Middle East. Bamford's premise is that the Bush administration, with the able assistance of its neo-conservatives previously employed by the Israeli government, manipulated the inadequate intelligence it received to increase public support for its war on Iraq. Along the way, tax dollars were used illegally to propagandize American citizens while the inept US media mutely watched. Additionally, the NSA spied on the UN Security Council and Hans Blix, the chief of the Iraq weapons inspectors.
Despite the complexity of the story author James Bamford writes, A Pretext For War is very readable and in fact is very interesting. Initially, Bamford follows the 9/11 terrorists and then the President and other US officials. The second section of the book traces the intelligence gathering. The third and final section of watches the Bush administration as it weaves the events, gathered intelligence and speculation into a tapestry of its own design
I recommend the well written reviews posted by Robert D. Steele and "autonomeus".
In the "how I would improve this book" category, I would like to have read more on the FBI / CIA turf battle over the terrorist investigations. In particular, more details about John P. O'Neill who headed the bureau's Counterterrorism Division. Finally, the noted fact that George Tennet, as Director of the CIA only controlled 15% of America's intelligence empire while Donald Rumsfield as Secretary of Defense controlled 85% of the intelligence was mentioned twice in the book (p 214 & p 353). Once would have been enough.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The power of lies: we all were wrong, March 28, 2006
By 
Luc REYNAERT (Beernem, Belgium) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies (Hardcover)
This book contains the analysis of two events: the 9/11 attacks and the war in Iraq. In both cases the evaluation of the intelligence community is devastating: the 9/11 attacks and the war in Iraq could eventually not be prevented; the first one because of incompetence, and the second one because of the cowardice of the CIA chief, who didn't fight or resign in protest, but chose simply to go along with all the lies.

The step by step description of the 9/11 events follows the official version. E.g., the collapse of Tower 7 of the WTC is due to blown debris which set the steel building on fire. Some official sources spoke of 'demolition'.

For a more critical evaluation of the events I recommend the works of N.M. Ahmed and D.R. Griffin.

Concerning the war in Iraq, the intelligence community knew that Saddam had no WMD and that there was absolutely no link between Saddam, Al-Qaeda and 9/11. But the Bush administration put the CIA under tremendous pressure to find 'something' that could justify a preemptive war. The administration didn't need serious intelligence reports. They wanted the CIA to serve their own agenda: rearrange the map in the Middle East by overthrowing Saddam and put a pro-Israel regime in his place.

When the bogus evidence became available, a massive disinformation campaign was launched in the gagged media in order to deceive the Americam people.

The author's description of the Iraq quagmire is a horror story.

Militarily, the poor, the young, those with the least education, those from small and rural towns paid with their lives, although they tended to vote for Bush.

In Iraq, the use of cluster bombs in residential neighbourhoods is leaving ten of thousands of live bombs in the backyards. 'The US military were killing and maiming the very people it had come to liberate.'

For the author,the regime change in Iraq is not the solution: (quoting T. Hamad) 'For all people in the Arab world, the Palestinian problem is the only problem they have with the US.'

The conclusion of the author is also a question mark: 'It is now clear that the original justification for the Iraq invasion was fraudulent. It was simply a pretext for war long advocated by a small group of hard-line neoconservatives'. 'The question mark to be answered is: How much of a factor support for Israel played in the ultimate decision?'

Quoting N. Guttman in Haaretz:'(there is) new life into the assertion that Israel and not American interests lead to the war in Iraq.'

James Bamford has written a courageous, but immensely sad book full of cynical behaviour.

A must read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq, and the Abuse of America's Intelligence Agencies
Used & New from: $0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.