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Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (and How to Take Advantage of It) Hardcover – January 5, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang (January 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080909469X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809094691
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #76,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Poundstone (Gaming the Vote) dives into the latest psychological findings to investigate how and why prices are allocated. Beginning with the controversial lawsuit in which a jury awarded $2.9 million in damages to a woman who had spilled a scalding cup of McDonald's coffee on herself, the author presents a readable history of how we are subtly manipulated into paying more (or less) for goods and services—and the research that attempts to explain our baffling and irrational susceptibility to pricing. The idea of anchoring and adjustment—setting an arbitrary number to subconsciously drive higher or lower estimates—is just one of many research areas explained at length. While Poundstone's case studies are vivid, the abundance of theories and experiments might prove overwhelming for the casual reader. Nevertheless, the scope of the analysis—its attention to economic abstractions as well as real-world consequences—braids together theory and practice to leave an indelible impression on the reader. Grocery shopping will never seem so simple again when one realizes how much work goes into assigning a price to a box of cereal. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Poundstone, author and columnist, reviews innovative work in psychology called behavioral decision theory, or the study of how people make decisions. We learn how people estimate numbers, the process of making wild guesses, jotting down offers and counteroffers, and rating anything on a scale of 1 to 10. Extensive research on pricing strategies has been conducted, and marketers have learned what people will pay is changeable and consumers can be manipulated. The book cites numerous experiments, including how juries award damages in court; reserve price research, or the maximum a buyer will pay; the way smart people are influenced by mere words and by the way choices are framed; sale prices are more powerful motivators than charm prices (those slightly below a round number); and money and chocolate are the most popular motivators in behavioral decision experiments. This collection of experiments and related findings is essentially an academic work for a variety of students. --Mary Whaley

More About the Author

William Poundstone is the author of two previous Hill and Wang books: Fortune's Formula and Gaming the Vote.

Customer Reviews

The chapters are short (typically around 4-5 pages long), which made them very easy to read.
Lawrence
Well, as it turns out, the underlying framework behind both of these questions is carefully discussed and elucidated in this very book!
rbnn
I found the book to be well written, entertaining enough that i finished its 336pp in three evenings of enjoyable reading.
D_shrink

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Oliver Fritsch on January 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I ordered this book after a good review in the Wall Street Journal.

From the title it sounds like a fairly dry book on pricing theories for a professional marketing audience.
In reality it is a very entertaining, well researched book about how prices are set from all kinds of businesses, how consumers react to them - and why.

Having worked in marketing and as an entrepreneur for 20 years, I have come across some of the stories quoted in the book already. However, I was not aware, that a German professor (Hermann Simon) runs the biggest pricing consulting firm in the world, that restaurant menus are better designed without leading dots before the price (otherwise they guide the eye to the lowest priced item) or that supermarkets yield a $2 higher average shopping cart revenue if the path through the market goes counterclockwise instead of clockwise.

It will take some work to extract pricing lessons for your own business (you actually have to READ the book first!) but it is pleasant enough!

Oliver Fritsch
Cendesic Marketing
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104 of 113 people found the following review helpful By Michele on January 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book after hearing the author interviewed on NPR. In the brief two-minute (or thereabouts) interview the author mentioned some factoids that sounded fascinating and whetted my appetite for more.

Now having read the book, I have to say that, although I learned things about the human mind I never knew before, I was disappointed in how dry the book was overall. The first half was devoted to the history of psychophysics, and numerous experiments conducted over the last hundred or so years. These experiments have served to establish just how quirky, irrational and suggestible the human mind is with regards to numbers, and pretty much debunk the established notion among economists that humans behave rationally when it comes to numbers, always making decisions that will best benefit themselves (the mythical Homo Economicus). Although these experiments were all new and surprising to me, reading about them felt like reading a college textbook. Not exactly my idea of pleasure reading!!

Just about exactly halfway through the book, Poundstone gets more interesting. This is when he starts citing real-world examples of how savvy businesses take advantage of the mind's susceptibility to numbers (often using the service of "price consultants"), all with the intent of getting clueless customers to part with more of their hard-earned money. This part of the book was truly fascinating, as he talked about how super-pricey designer boutiques arrange merchandise in their stores, how restaurants design their menus, and how new and unknown artists price their work to gain attention.

Alas, this part of the book was all too short, as Poundstone soon lapsed again into talking about more experiments.
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76 of 85 people found the following review helpful By rbnn on February 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There is an intriguing irony (if not synchronicity) to my purchase of this book.

The story is, I had been trying to buy this book for a few weeks from Amazon.

But I couldn't (without incurring shipping fees), because Amazon had delisted the hardcover book from their catalog. Why would Amazon refuse to sell a new book by a prominent author? Well, ostensibly it was "retaliation" for the book publisher's (Macmillan's) request that Amazon charge higher prices for Kindle books published by Macmillan. Leaving aside the question of why users without a Kindle should have their ordinary book access restricted because of a pricing dispute over a product they do not want, the imbroglio raises two salient issues about pricing:

(1) Why is $9.99 (what Amazon wanted to charge) the "right" price for a Kindle e-book? Why not $12.00 or $14.00 (which Macmillan wanted to charge)? If you read some of the Kindle users' blogs, they are adamant that $9.99 is the right price, and that $14.00 is too high - but how do they know?

(2) Why would Macmillan care if Amazon charges too little for Kindle pricing anyway? It doesn't directly affect their profits (Amazon makes up the difference).

Well, as it turns out, the underlying framework behind both of these questions is carefully discussed and elucidated in this very book!

As to issue (1), Poundstone argues that much of what we think of as "fair" pricing is nothing more than a collection of cognitive fallacies and biases. The most important of these fallacies are the contrast effect (pricing taking on significance from neighboring prices) and the anchoring effect (we are drawn to a particular number).
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By BEL8490 on May 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
From "The recursive Universe" (1984) till "Fortune's Formula" (2005), I am a longtime mostly happy reader of Poundstone. This time, I'm not.
The present book is a loose collection of newspaper like items, 57 in total and grouped into four parts. Nowhere in the book I found an explanation
what the parts stand for. Nor is there any introduction explaining the structure of the book or its goals. Neither is there any conclusion at the end.
Googling the internet on Kahneman, Tversky and Thaler would probably catch 80 percent of the contents, if not more. But Poundstone did that for me.
Is it worth its price? According to Max Bazerman, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School on the backflap:
"If you can get this book for under $100, grab it! After you read it, you will better understand why the price you paid felt like a bargain".
I got the book for $17.81 (march 2010). Given the set anchor and the priceless project theory, I should feel happy. But I don't.
Which could explain why its current (may 2010) price is under $15.

You can get a free flavour of the anecdotical topics covered in the book at: [...]
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