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Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures Hardcover – June 1, 2010

4.3 out of 5 stars 251 customer reviews

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From Publishers Weekly

Former FBI agent Wittman, who created the agency's Art Crime Team and pursued a lifelong interest in antiques and collectibles, goes undercover to hobnob with infamous art thieves. The ineffective, the stupid, the clever, and the dangerous; Wittman befriends them all, in order to betray them, a fact that causes him a certain amount of angst. Among other challenges are bumbling agency bureaucrats and government turf wars when attempting to recover stolen art abroad. A fatal car accident that Wittman was involved in early in his career shaped his perspective: "I understood that because someone made a mistake in judgment, it didn't make him evil. My newfound ability to see both sides of a situation-to think and feel like the accused-was invaluable." Wittman keeps the narrative interesting, and reveals himself as something of a renegade: "Under the FBI's strict undercover rules, you're only supposed to work one case at a time. I never followed that rule." Keep the lies to a minimum, he advises, and avoid working in your home town.
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Review

“Almost every case he recounts has enough intrigue and suspense for a Hollywood screenplay.”--The Washington Post

"Genius... Riveting.... Should be a TV series."--Los Angeles Times

"A rollicking memoir... investigative details dazzle... PRICELESS can read at times, not unpleasantly, as if an art history textbook got mixed up at the printer with a screenplay for THE WIRE."--The New York Times

"Riveting... superbly crafted... absolutely, hands down the best book ever written on art crime."--Associated Press

“I can’t think of a better title for a book than this one, PRICELESS.  Because this non-fiction story is priceless, a spellbinding narrative of an FBI agent’s journey into the crazy murk of what is perhaps the most fascinating criminal activity of all, high-stakes art theft into the millions upon millions.”--Buzz Bissinger, New York Times bestselling author of FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS and coauthor of SHOOTING STARS

"Entertaining...crime buffs will receive a painless education while they enjoy a lively account of art thieves and the man who pursued them."--Kirkus Reviews
 
"Wittman's memoir, PRICELESS, is a fast-paced, gripping narrative of stolen national treasures and those who traffic in them. An undercover lawman armed with wit and adrenalin, Wittman exposes the darkest corners of the art world and brings to justice the dangerous criminals who lurk there."--Laney Salisbury, co-author of PROVENANCE: HOW A CON  MAN AND A FORGER REWROTE THE HISTORY OF MODERN ART
 
"In one riveting sequence after another, Robert Wittman reveals the art world’s underbelly as it has never been seen, through the eyes of an undercover agent whose investigative acumen is matched only by his art-history chops. A true page-turner."--Benjamin Wallace, New York Times bestseller author of THE BILLIONAIRE’S VINEGAR
 
“With suspense, intrigue, and candor, FBI agent Robert Wittman takes us inside the secret world of stolen art as he goes undercover to solve some of the most notorious art thefts of our time.”—Ronald Kessler, New York Times bestselling author of THE BUREAU and IN THE PRESIDENT’S SECRET SERVICE
 
“PRICELESS is a gem of a story, part James Bond, part art history.  If Robert Wittman didn’t already exist, Dan Brown would have made him up.”--George Anastasia, New York Times bestselling author BLOOD AND HONOR, THE LAST GANGSTER and THE SUMMER WIND
 
"More realistic than THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR, more entertaining than CATCH ME IF YOU CAN.  It's hard to believe one undercover FBI Agent rescued so many cultural and national treasures......but it's all true.”--Jack Garcia, former FBI undercover agent and New York Times bestselling author of MAKING JACK FALCONE
 
PRICELESS is a rare and riveting journey into the little-understood world of art crime.  A brilliant professional who sees both the big picture and all of its nuances, Wittman fascinates with tales of his daring adventures as an FBI undercover agent.  Demonstrating candor, humor, integrity, and sensitivity, Wittman strips away the myths, bares the truth, and tells it like it is.  He and PRICELESS are both precisely that--priceless!”--Andrea Kane, New York Times bestselling author of DRAWN IN BLOOD
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Crown; First Edition first Printing edition (June 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307461475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307461476
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.1 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (251 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #261,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By C. W. Caspari Jr. on June 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very much a page-turner. Wittman's got a lot of great stories to tell about why we should appreciate art, how some government agencies have a warped sense of priorities and of course the fascinating ways in which some of the most infamous property crimes in history have played out and his role in them.

There are suave characters, misfit gangsters and plot twists that can make you laugh or cry (depending on how much of an appreciation of art you may have - and if you don't have much of one, you will by the time you finish this book). Some of the "gangster talk" is right out of Hollywood; you wouldn't believe it if dialogue wasn't culled from bugged meet-ups and hidden video. But it's all real! And its told in a style that at times borders on gumshoe noir, which keeps the action lively.

Highly recommended for a fun summer read; I think anyone would enjoy this international thriller and might even learn something along the way.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love art history, and I love true crime stories, so I was really surprised that I didn't love PRICELESS. There were some interesting bits here and there, but I had to force myself to finish the book.

First of all, PRICELESS is very much a memoir - it's the story of the author's life, not the story of art crime. I was hoping for the story of art crime - not just Bob Wittman's personal experience with it. I didn't really want to learn all about Bob Wittman's life, but I did. He tells us what his dad did for a living, how he got into the FBI, the time he was charged with drunk driving, what he was doing on 9/11, things that are memorable to him but didn't really catch my interest.

Each chapter focuses on a particular sting that Wittman made. But...apparently undercover work isn't that exciting. Now, I can appreciate that the reality is probably a lot different than the movies, and it's interesting to get a glimpse of the unvarnished truth. But the truth is mighty dull. A lot of these undercover operations boil down to, "This guy was selling some stolen art, so I pretended like I was a broker who wanted to sell it on the black market, and once we were sure the art was authentic we arrested him." Sure, maybe Wittman's heart was pounding at the time, and yeah, it would be kind of crazy to have a fake identity and "befriend and betray" a bunch of criminals. But it's not a page-turner.

I thought Wittman's discussion of art history was really shallow. He got his entire art education by taking a course at an eccentric museum in Philadelphia. It did him a lot of good - but it didn't make him an expert. More like an amateur who doesn't realize that he's got a lot left to learn.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The most interesting elements of "Priceless" were the facts regarding art and art theft and the awe and respect with which the author describes the pieces he views and recovers.

"Americans, in particular, are said to be uncultured when it comes to high art, more likely to go to a ballpark than a museum. But as I tell my foreign colleagues, the statistics belie that stereotype. Americans visit museums on a scale eclipsing sports. In 2007, more people visited the Smithsonian Institution museums in Washington (24.2 million) than attended a game played by the Nations Basketball Association (21.8 million), the National Hockey League (21.2 million), or the National Football League (17 million)."

I was shocked by that fact. I was also surprised by the different priority level that the US places on art theft, compared to other countries. Despite the record prices being paid for historical and artistic pieces now, the penalties for their theft weren't comparable. The trails that Wittman goes through trying to deal with and change the investigation procedures in these cases was very interesting.

But the points at which I was most interested in this story, in the memoirs of this FBI agent were when he described his reactions to the stolen treasures he tried to restore to their place in the world.

"This was my first antiquity case, but as I would learn, looters are especially insidious art thieves. They not only invade the sanctuaries of our ancestors, plundering burial grounds and lost cities in a reckless dash for buried treasure, they also destroy our ability to learn about our past in ways other art thieves do not. When a painting is stolen from a museum, we usually know its provenance. We know where it came from, who painted it, when and perhaps even why.
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Format: Hardcover
Priceless has just about everything you'd want in a book, with appeal to all sorts of readers. In light of the recent art heist in Paris, this is timely and fascinating. Wittman's exploits do indeed read like a crime thriller, keeping the pages turning in a breathless fashion. I'll definitely buy more copies as gifts!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you are a fan of art and art museums, you are probably aware of some of the high profile art thefts that have been covered by the newspapers at the time and then never mentioned again. Aren't you curious about if and how they were solved, who worked on the cases, and whether the pieces were returned intact? Many of those questions are answered in this fascinating, factual account of one man's career with the FBI chasing down the thieves that got away.

He arrested my attention from the first chapter and I was forced to keep reading to satisfy my curiosity. I loved his description of the training that helped him become expert in the field and it made me want to take some time off for some classes myself.

Even if you don't know much about art, you will enjoy the clever traps the writer lays for these hapless criminals and cheer when they fall in head first.

A fun read.
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