Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $6.78 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by bacobooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: *****FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING with Amazon Prime. Great Buy*****
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $4.85
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Pricing the Priceless Child: The Changing Social Value of Children Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.22
$20.98 $14.50

Frequently Bought Together

Pricing the Priceless Child: The Changing Social Value of Children + Huck's Raft: A History of American Childhood
Price for both: $49.46

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (August 8, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691034591
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691034591
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #395,739 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"[The] argument about the future of childhood will go on, and it must now include the facts, point of view, and even taxonomy brought forward in Pricing the Priceless Child."--Neil Postman, The Washington Post



"[Zelizer's book] is an imaginative work on an important topic, which will surely find an appreciative audience among historians."--Nancy Tomes, Reviews in American History


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this thoroughly researched and well-written book, Zelizer tackles a formidable and important subject: the shifting economic and social value of American children. Her point of entry into the discussion of the history of childhood rests on a clearly defined thesis: as the economic value of children decreased in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, children's emotional and spiritual value gained ascendancy. Zelizar examines the vital roles of child labor and child work -- two very different, but related, concepts -- in the formation of the modern American child, neatly and compellingly charting the relationship between the nineteenth-century forebear and its twentieth-century counterpart. For example, the early twentieth-century child factory laborer represents the concept of child labor -- children who help to support their family by turning over their wages and working extra hours. The mid-to-late-twentieth-century child indulges in "child work" such as baby sitting or delivering papers, often earning an allowance he or she can keep since the object is to teach a child the values of money and responsibility. Zelizer offers explanations and rationales for such phenomena as the early twentieth-century rise of playgrounds in urban areas, the struggle of child actors to keep their hard-earned fortunes, and the history of the rise of black-market babies in the twentieth century. Zelizer's study is compelling for any reader and a must-read for anyone interested in children's history or children's literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Aaron Swartz on May 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
When one begins reading about the history of childhood, one book is almost universally cited: this one. And with good reason -- it's a clear compelling study of a surprising change in the way children were viewed. Each chapter picks a particular topic (child labor, child burial, wrongful death) and amasses copious evidence to show a massive change in the way children were viewed, from purely economic actors (who aided with their parent's work) to priceless bundles of joy.

The evidence is artfully collected but hearing the same story again and again gets to be a little old. I wish that instead of simply amassing more evidence, Zelizer stepped back a little and investigated the causes of such a massive change or at least provided us with more details about her theory.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Derek Donwerth on September 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
Zelizer was able to present the shifting attitude of Americans toward children, especially the way we have shifted from placing an actual economic value on children toward valuing children almost purely on their inherent value as children. Countless examples are presented throughout the book showing the difference in attitudes toward children in the early twentieth century, and the progression into the mid-twentieth century. The only problem I felt was present was how repetitive the theory was when applied to different examples, but I feel like this is the nature of the topic covered so I don't feel like it is a very big problem.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa6bbbaa4)