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Pride and Prejudice [Kindle Edition]

Jane Austen
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,317 customer reviews)

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Book Description

In this historic romance, young Elizabeth Bennet strives for love, independence and honesty in the vapid high society of 19th century England.

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife."

Next to the exhortation at the beginning of Moby-Dick, "Call me Ishmael," the first sentence of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice must be among the most quoted in literature. And certainly what Melville did for whaling Austen does for marriage--tracing the intricacies (not to mention the economics) of 19th-century British mating rituals with a sure hand and an unblinking eye. As usual, Austen trains her sights on a country village and a few families--in this case, the Bennets, the Philips, and the Lucases. Into their midst comes Mr. Bingley, a single man of good fortune, and his friend, Mr. Darcy, who is even richer. Mrs. Bennet, who married above her station, sees their arrival as an opportunity to marry off at least one of her five daughters. Bingley is complaisant and easily charmed by the eldest Bennet girl, Jane; Darcy, however, is harder to please. Put off by Mrs. Bennet's vulgarity and the untoward behavior of the three younger daughters, he is unable to see the true worth of the older girls, Jane and Elizabeth. His excessive pride offends Lizzy, who is more than willing to believe the worst that other people have to say of him; when George Wickham, a soldier stationed in the village, does indeed have a discreditable tale to tell, his words fall on fertile ground.

Having set up the central misunderstanding of the novel, Austen then brings in her cast of fascinating secondary characters: Mr. Collins, the sycophantic clergyman who aspires to Lizzy's hand but settles for her best friend, Charlotte, instead; Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Mr. Darcy's insufferably snobbish aunt; and the Gardiners, Jane and Elizabeth's low-born but noble-hearted aunt and uncle. Some of Austen's best comedy comes from mixing and matching these representatives of different classes and economic strata, demonstrating the hypocrisy at the heart of so many social interactions. And though the novel is rife with romantic misunderstandings, rejected proposals, disastrous elopements, and a requisite happy ending for those who deserve one, Austen never gets so carried away with the romance that she loses sight of the hard economic realities of 19th-century matrimonial maneuvering. Good marriages for penniless girls such as the Bennets are hard to come by, and even Lizzy, who comes to sincerely value Mr. Darcy, remarks when asked when she first began to love him: "It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley." She may be joking, but there's more than a little truth to her sentiment, as well. Jane Austen considered Elizabeth Bennet "as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print". Readers of Pride and Prejudice would be hard-pressed to disagree. --Alix Wilber

From Library Journal

Austen is the hot property of the entertainment world with new feature film versions of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility on the silver screen and Pride and Prejudice hitting the TV airwaves on PBS. Such high visibility will inevitably draw renewed interest in the original source materials. These new Modern Library editions offer quality hardcovers at affordable prices.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 547 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008476HBM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #240 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still in love with Darcy April 28, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
I admit it! I am smitten by Darcy and have been since I was 13 years old. I return to him and Lizzy at least once a year, usually at a low point in my life when I am in dire need of simple pleasures. A re-read of Pride and Prejudice is guaranteed to revive my spirits and firmly knock me out of any thoughts of wallowing in self-pity or doom and gloom. So what a treat it was to get this e-book for absolutely nothing!

You cannot read Jane Austen's novels without being struck by just how skilful she was at deploying the English language. That is why I can continuously go back to her books with no risk of boredom. I find myself completely caught up in the sheer brilliance of her work.

But, as I openly admitted before, I really go back time and again to get my annual Darcy fix. Why do I love Darcy?:

1. He's obscenely rich
2. He's good looking
3. He's intelligent
4. He is brooding and arrogant - the original "bad boy" of literature
5. He is smitten by Lizzy who is clever, vibrant and atypical of what men desired in her era
6. He loves his sister
7. He realizes the error of his ways and consciously embarks on a self-improvement project for Lizzy - Let's face it, all women believe that they are capable of changing their man for the better (well, in our opinion anyway)
8. He is not afraid to take drastic action against injustice

These characteristics are fairly standard for the male heroes in romance novels, but there are few of these heroes are able to compare favourably with Darcy. So I will probably continue to be smitten by him for the foreseeable future, and that's fine, because it really is no hardship to read Austen's masterpiece every year.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars used to hate it January 31, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
In high school, my enjoyment of old European art was always hampered by my gratitude that I'm not any of these exasperating people or in any of their stifling situations. I felt so blessed and superior that I escaped sitting around mending bonnets all day, waiting to go on a walk- how boring and pathetic! Upon rereading this years later, I was able to let go of these old prejudices and more objectively view the characters in the situation they were in. That was when I realized Austen is a genius: I saw how much she understands and subtly, humorously conveys, and how little I'd understood before. Now I actually consider this to be a work of rationalist literature, in addition to a brilliant romantic comedy.

In my previous reading, I thought that the only intelligent, reasonable character was Mr. Darcy, and that everyone else's problems was brought on by their own idiocy, of which their unjust hatred of the virtuous, blameless Mr. Darcy was only further evidence. This time around, I realized that he caused some of these problems himself. Mr. Darcy's arrogance caused problems he could've easily avoided by being slightly nicer. Instead, he prided himself in his bluntness and in his own virtuousness, thus causing people to resent him, because who likes someone who thinks he's better than you, even if he actually is? Similarly, Lizzy demonstrates all of our tendencies to like and be less questioning of information coming from someone who flatters us. This causes us to have errors in judgment and believe things we would otherwise be more critical of. Mr. Darcy shows an amazing ability to step outside personal biases and view things from other's perspectives- a rationalist romantic hero! Austen understood the female wish: a rich, moral, loyal man completely rational about all things, except for his irrational love for his weird woman.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jane Austen January 23, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Still a great story;even after multiple readings. Timeless. Will read it again in the future. A personal favorite of Jane Austen"s work.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is soooo funny! August 16, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Ok. I'll admit I've read this book many times. If I'd read the Bible as many times, I'd be a theological genius or savant or something. I'll also admit I own the complete finished works of Jane Austen in hardback, though I seldom read her other works anymore. I've been out of grad school for 35 years, after all. Furthermore, I will admit I have 3 copies of P&P on my Kindle. One of those copies is AWFUL--riddled with editorial errors attributable to digital input glitches. The other is a bit better, but this version I had to get because it was free and it was illustrated. If you have a Kindle Fire and if you are fairly obsessed with color, as I am, you will enjoy this particular version. Here's why:

(1)It is written from a publication of the work close to the author's original spelling and phrasing--not true of today's more modern English versions of the work. Can't be having weird spellings and grammar quirks in high school and college English lit classes here. It confuses the students, who already wonder what's so great about this British old maid writer from a couple centuries back.
(2)It incorporates the illustrations from not one but two different printings of P&P--illustrations done after the author was deceased, mind you, but charming and roughly contemporaneous with her period, nonetheless.
(3) Because it has two different sets of illustrations, it is fascinating to see the different depictions of the characters. Interesting that the men seem to me to look similar in both sets of illustrations, and some of the minor female characters (who are not prominent in these illustrations) seem to look the same, but the principals are different. Lizzy is dark haired in one set and golden haired in the other. Jane is golden haired in both.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars One of My Favorite Novels
I love this book. I've read it many times--not to mention having watched the movie at least a dozen times. Read more
Published 1 hour ago by Reading Fanatic (CMP)
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for casual readers
Very hard to read. You have to read it slowly to understand the Old English Way of speaking. Very good storyline. It ended too abruptly.
Published 11 hours ago by F. Z. Francisco
5.0 out of 5 stars boring at first but amazing middleish on!!!
Amazing after chapter 30 a little slow before then :) made to read for English but really enjoyed it after getting into it
Published 11 hours ago by Halla
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful.
Never did like this book. Please find a willing producer and make it a 3D movie maybe it would appeal to me and others. YUK!!!
Published 18 hours ago by LaRita Murrell
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a classic!
There's not much to be said - You either love literature or you don't.

For those who do, it's a wonderful read.
Published 22 hours ago by Kevin
5.0 out of 5 stars Have conquered my own pride and prejudice reading this
Pride and prejudice – words figuring heavily in my relationship with classic literature. Truthfully, I’ve never had a keen interest in the classics. Read more
Published 1 day ago by Lit Lovers Lane
5.0 out of 5 stars Favorite Book
This book holds the heart of women inside. I have read it more than 10 times and will read it 100 more times.
Published 1 day ago by Nichole
5.0 out of 5 stars My fave!!!
This is one of my all time favorite books about this time period. Defiantly a must read if you haven't read it:)
Published 1 day ago by Frednisha Jackson
5.0 out of 5 stars Love the humor in this book
I am a great fan of Jane Austen, and this book is probably my favorite. I love her sense of humor.
Published 2 days ago by Aina Johansen
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite Jane Austen novel
I have loved this novel since the first time I read in it when I was in 7th grade. I'm so happy to be able to have a digital copy that I can pull up and read anytime I want.
Published 2 days ago by criosti
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More About the Author

Though the domain of Jane Austen's novels was as circumscribed as her life, her caustic wit and keen observation made her the equal of the greatest novelists in any language. Born the seventh child of the rector of Steventon, Hampshire, on December 16, 1775, she was educated mainly at home. At an early age she began writing sketches and satires of popular novels for her family's entertainment. As a clergyman's daughter from a well-connected family, she had an ample opportunity to study the habits of the middle class, the gentry, and the aristocracy. At twenty-one, she began a novel called "The First Impressions" an early version of Pride and Prejudice. In 1801, on her father's retirement, the family moved to the fashionable resort of Bath. Two years later she sold the first version of Northanger Abby to a London publisher, but the first of her novels to appear was Sense and Sensibility, published at her own expense in 1811. It was followed by Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815). After her father died in 1805, the family first moved to Southampton then to Chawton Cottage in Hampshire. Despite this relative retirement, Jane Austen was still in touch with a wider world, mainly through her brothers; one had become a very rich country gentleman, another a London banker, and two were naval officers. Though her many novels were published anonymously, she had many early and devoted readers, among them the Prince Regent and Sir Walter Scott. In 1816, in declining health, Austen wrote Persuasion and revised Northanger Abby, Her last work, Sandition, was left unfinished at her death on July 18, 1817. She was buried in Winchester Cathedral. Austen's identity as an author was announced to the world posthumously by her brother Henry, who supervised the publication of Northanger Abby and Persuasion in 1818.

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