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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Put down the embroidery needles; let's kill a Zombie!
Let's start off with some reviewer honesty, here. I've never been fond of Zombie stories, or movies. C'mon, who could be afraid of something that walks with the efficiency of a two-toed sloth, while shedding body parts. More than once, I've shouted, 'don't scream---just run.' Now Vampires, my favorite creatures of the night, they're a different story. You can't run...
Published on April 29, 2010 by Shiloh True

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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More Zombies But Less Austen: Yet Another Moster Mash Up, Slight but Fun
When you remove the novelty from a novelty novel, you end up with something akin to "Dawn of the Dreadfuls." Mind you, there is nothing particularly wrong with Steve Hockensmith's prequel to the surprise hit of last year, "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies"--it just seems somewhat unnecessary. I will defend "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" as an ingenious experiment, but...
Published on March 23, 2010 by K. Harris


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5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic We All Can Read, April 20, 2010
By 
The library had Dawn of the Dreadfuls available so I picked it up first. This book is a prequel to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (It takes place 4 years before) and it is written in a more modern fashion.

Author Steve Hockensmith shows us how the Bennet sisters learn to be lethal zombie slayers.

Beginning with a corpse awakening during his funeral, the zombie action never lets up.

Mr Bennet attempts to teach his daughters, Elizabeth, Jane, Mary, Lydia and Kitty the ways of the ninja. He soon brings in the help of his Master Mr. Hawksworth (although Mr Hawksworth is hiding a secret)

With the girls trying to defeat the zombie horde through strength, Elizabeth meets Dr Keckilpenny who believes, through study, he can find the answer.

Which man will win Elizabeth's heart: Hawksworth or Keckilpenny? Or will a zombie eat her heart?

This book is a terrific read. It has action, romance and a lot of humor. I particularly enjoyed the head-cleaving in the cemetery scene. "Come join us for a picnic!"

Ah, classic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars So fun, April 16, 2010
By 
Michele Lee (Louisville, KY) - See all my reviews
Reviewed for [...]

Yes, it's another mash up, a prequel to last year's smash hit Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. The dreadfuls fit rather well into the repressive, judgmental setting of Regency England (and into "stuffy" literature similar to what many were required to read in high school English class). The tone is wry, utterly sarcastic, yet intelligent as well. The story pits a young family of girls, whose father makes them pariahs by inviting a ninja master for the Orient to his home to train them, against the trickling return of the undead hordes from long ago and against love, society and preconceived notions. What follows is a classic comedy of errors.
This book is simultaneously a mocking of classic literature, and a glorious example of fine writing, a metaphor for war against the aging and loss of innocence of children, and a call to stand up for what's right and not what's deemed proper by society. Austen's work hasn't been abandoned to a hack looking for easy money with this volume, but has been imprinted upon by an award winning, savvy writer who simply gets it, and deftly reminds readers that literature can be fun and unexpectedly poignant as well.
Highly recommended for libraries, particularly those looking to expand a bare bones horror collection or meet the need of readers who prefer more mainstream tale to the hardcore horror books.
Contains: Gore, poop jokes
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4.0 out of 5 stars Imaginative, irreverent and a little gory, this book is an amusing take on Jane Austen's characters., April 14, 2010
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Dawn of the Dreadfuls is an inventive, irreverent read. For those who love the charm of the regency era but also have a slightly twisted sense of humor.

For those unfamiliar with the premise of this book this is the prequel to the publisher's earlier book, Pride Prejudice and Zombies. Pride Prejudice and Zombies was an original and outrageous take on Jane Austen's original Pride and Prejudice but in an alternate world where the young Bennet girls are young ladies looking not only for marriage but also intent on fighting and killing the dreadful zombies which have invaded England.

In this prequel, the author tells how the Bennet girls discover that their father is actually a Zombie slayer. And their mortification when they realize their heritage is to become part of England's defense as slayers, too! The girls meet some very interesting characters such as a zombie doctor, their master of martial arts as well an old flame of Mrs. Bennet's. I have to admit, these were vastly amusing and fresh characters. (However, I could not help comparing the 'spoofed' characters to the tone and feel of the original characters and felt the reinvented characters such as Elizabeth somewhat wanting.) I did feel the twists and turns the author created were well paced and surprisingly fun.

While not out right horror the images of dead zombies will make you laugh in glee or cringe a little at the mayhem. However, if you are purist and in love with the original Jane Austen books you may feel it a desecration to beloved characters.

Imaginative, irreverent and a little gory, this book is an amusing take on Jane Austen's characters in an 'alternate' universe. I enjoyed it and found it light and fast paced read for those with a quirky, off beat sense of humor. It was a solid book but I wouldn't run out and immediately buy another in this series. This story was fun and a little campy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Written well but still slow in pacing, April 14, 2010
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There is no doubt in my mind that Steve Hockensmith's Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies) is well written. It is well written and perfect for the time of Jane Austen's England while retaining a certain irreverence needed for this re-imagining of the P&P story.

That said, it was a slow read for me. I had a friend read it as well to get her opinion. I didn't tell her if I liked it. Just for her to read it.

She said the same thing: Characters were pitch perfect. Setting as well. Loved the addition of the dreadfuls. Mr Bennett as sensei was great. Bennett sisters as zombie-slayers was also great.

BUT it was a slow read.

So we took one star off the rating for the slow read to give a 4-star rating.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable Read, April 11, 2010
Dawn of the Dreadfuls is a prequel to last year's hit Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and takes place four years before. In this book, zombies (aka "unmentionables" or "dreadfuls") took over the world before any of the Bennet children were born during a time called "The Troubles". They now have risen again and it's up to Mr. Bennet to train his daughters to be the protectors of the community even though it would make the community shun the girls for unladylike behavior, much to the dismay of Mrs. Bennet.

I never read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but am an avid Jane Austen fan and when I won Dawn of the Dreadfuls from [...], I couldn't wait to read it. I think the author did a great job of capturing the characters and putting a Jane Austen flavor to this book. I felt it was very believable...or as close to being believable as you can get when zombies are involved anyway. It was satisfyingly gory and I would probably compare it to "Shaun of the Dead" or "Fido" but only not quite as funny. I was also surprised that I found the romantic triangles with Lizzie and Jane to be as intriguing as they were. I obviously know who each end up with, yet was pulling for different suitors. Being such a Darcy fan that I am, it really struck me as odd a few times. I ran out and bought Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and can't wait to read what is next for the Bennets.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I hope these girls wash their hands before dinner, April 6, 2010
By 
Monkdude (Hampton, Virginia) - See all my reviews
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I have yet to read the first super popular book in the series, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, written by Seth Grahame-Smith, but Steve Hockensmith is more than up to the task with this prequel. I just bought Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith the other day (the front and back cover art won me over), and I can't wait to get started on that one.

You don't need to read the first book in order to enjoy Dawn of the Dreadfuls. There is plenty or action, humor, gore, and enough back story to get anyone caught up to speed. All of the characters are quite amusing as well. What's not to love about five young girls being trained to kill zombies properly by their father?

Dawn of the Dreadfuls isn't anything worth gushing over too much, but it's very entertaining and should please most horror fans.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable Even For Those Who Have Never Read Austen, April 5, 2010
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Here is where I perjure myself. I was an English major in college, but I have never read Pride and Prejudice. I'm always up for a good book, no matter what style of writing it is in, so I decided to give Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls a chance. And I'm actually quite glad that I did.

The pace of the book is great. It doesn't take long to get the action moving and it goes along at a good clip. This novel isn't the first one that marriages Jane Austen and Zombies (although, in the book, saying the "Z" word is not acceptable - a nice little quirk of Regency England that the author put in), but it is the prequel. Regardless of this fact, the author didn't assume that every reader would know exactly what was going on, and instead gave us a bit of a back story during the dialogue, helping to make those people who haven't read the first book from feeling left out.

I have to admit that at first I was going to give this three stars. It wasn't the best book I've ever read, and there are definitely some things that I wish I'd seen more of during the book. Then, however, I started got to the end of the book and realized that I was extremely interested to know what happened in Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and that I was extremely satisfied with the ending, so the author definitely did his job. While, to me, this isn't 5 star material (although I have a feeling the previous book is), it's definitely a great, fun, easy read, no matter whether you've read the first book in the series, or the original Austen novel, or not!
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5.0 out of 5 stars P & P and more zombies, with a free hand, April 4, 2010
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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies was a tour de force, a clever blending and infiltration of P & P by, yes, zombies. There's now a prequel, unencumbered by the need to incorporate Austen's text. Does it work? Yes, it does. And it is even more fun than its predecessor/sequel.

Did you ever wonder how Mr. Bennet got so detached from his family and his responsibilities, and what the roots are of his disagreement with his wife? One answer is here. Did you ever wonder how the Bennett daughters got to be such good zombie fighters? The answer is here. Did you wonder why Lady Catherine de Bourgh has such a fine reputation? One answer is here.

Steven Hockersmith has put together a fine and funny satire; one of his original characters, the limbless but flirtatious and gallant Captain Cannon, is a great satirical achievement. Another of his inventions is a doctor who keeps a zombie in the attic and to experiment on...another echo of a familiar Regency story. The Bennet family show their personalities well in his hands, and Mary gets to be a heroine at last though she does not eclipse her older sisters (as is her ambition).

And there's lots of satirical zombie mayhem.

In short, an entertaining read that avoids the curse of the prequel and offers a few flashes of brilliance. What are you waiting for?
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Dead don't Seem to like Caskets., April 1, 2010
By 
TorridlyBoredShopper "T(to the)B(to the)S" ("Daddy Dagon's Daycare" - Proud Sponsor of the Little Tendril Baseball Team, USA) - See all my reviews
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Everything has a start - and that start normally defines who and what you will see for the rest of something's life. In Dawn of, that start begins in a nice little setting - a funeral - where some people come to mourn, sme come to give opinions, and some come to start their unlife. That is where it all goes wrong and right (depending on what you want from the story) and where you see certain people become killing machines for the undead. Its a good thing, too, because think of the next set of years without those swords doing their dance. There would be no highbrow motions, no places that say "I am better than the living and the dead," and no top halfs sliding off to meet the ground. That would be sad, too, all things considered.
Me - i liked the last book and I liked this one.

In some ways, this book has some parts that are better than the first. It still holds the style it is supposed to hold, and i think it keeps the same shape that it is supposed to have. I know a lot of people were not happy with the last book, either, and if you are one fo those you should not fault those of us that are. I judge this as a zombie book, seeing the humor in it, while holding no il will for the first Pride and Prejudioe. One is a masterpiece and the other one is a nice "what if," suspending belief that existed during that day.

Without wasting a lot of time with a huge description, I would say to buy it if you liked the last, to try it out if you sort of liked the last, and ignore if you simply can't stand what this does. It is written a bit better this time around, not having to have all the confines of the last book. That makes it fun and funny, mocking all sorts of things and having a good time at the expense of so many icons. Personally, I find that to be fruitful, making me laugh a lot more than I thought I would and to be engaged more than I thought possible.

I would have bought it in a second, but happened into it. Good things come from the undead cravings.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A fun read especially if you remember the classic, September 1, 2014
By 
A fun read especially if you remember the classic. This book takes the Bennet family and places them under a zombie attack. It's much better than it sounds. The send up of the Victorian language and sensibilities. The author does a good job of staying true to character and era. A great light read for a Winter afternoon.
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