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Primes and Programming Paperback – September 24, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0521409889 ISBN-10: 0521409888

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 24, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521409888
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521409889
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,143,772 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An interesting, sophisticated introduction to number theory..." American Mathematical Monthly

"Of the many volumes I have seen about `number theory and computing', this delightful, if unorthodox, introductory text is probably the finest...a great strength of this book is its emphasis on computing and on computing examples. There are several programs included in the text, often different algorithms for achieving the same computational result, and both theoretical and practical reasons for preferring one method over another are discussed. The programming language is Pascal, which is perfectly appropriate...[and] there are a great many numerial exercises and examples...only the deadest of students could possibly consider this dry; the author has brought life and energy to the subject by his presentation." Duncan Buell, Mathematical Reviews

Book Description

Primality has recently become of commercial importance because it is related to the security of codes. This introductory book describes some of the more elementary methods of factorization and primality testing that do not require detailed knowledge of other areas of mathematics.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By D. Taylor on January 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is definitely an introduction, but since "introduction" is in the title of the book, you've been warned. The book is really about number theory, the programming part is very basic and much of it left to the reader/student as exercises. The programs are written in "old school" Pascal, which was the pedagogical language of choice in the pre-Internet era (I was schooled in the pre-internet era myself). This book takes little account of algorithmic efficiency (although, it does show how to get double-precision arithmetic out of Pascal). If you're looking for an approach from scratch, this is your book. If you're a mathematician looking for an emphasis on programming and algorithms get Hans Riesel's "Prime Numbers and Computer Methods for Factorization" -- a more advanced book. If you're a programmer, much of the material (and sometimes more) is also in O'Reilly's "Algorithms in...[Perl, C, C++]" in the "number theory" chapters and would make better additions to your library.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By UMESH NAIR on March 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a book to enjoy. Learn a great deal of Number theory and almost everything about prime numbers, including topics like cryptography. The Pascal programs are clear, and will help you to learn the theory in an enjoyable way. I would expect to have a second edition implemented in Java or C++, with additional code for multiprecision arithmetic. A great book to have, if you are new to number theory. However, if you are looking for a broader coverage, the right book is "Introduction to Number Theory with computing" by RBJT Allenby and E.J. Redfern. If you do not care computing, and want to have in-depth knowledge on Number theory, "An Introduction to Number Theory" by Hardy and Wright is the best (though it is not easy-readable!). If you want to have a short but complete introduction to Number theory, get "Higher Mathematics" by Davenport.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
The book is a practical introduction to Number Theory and the exercises are gradual and accesibles. I will be pleased if in a next edition a diskette with the programs is included.
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