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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars PRINCE CASPIAN by C. S. Lewis
Prince Caspian, or, Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia (1951) is a children's fantasy novel, the second in C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. Here, Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are drawn back to Narnia, where hundreds of years have passed, and must work to overthrow a usurper and put the rightful king on the throne.

The story itself is rather...
Published on January 28, 2011 by MOTU Review

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3.0 out of 5 stars Fine for Children, Light for Adults
In the sequel to "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe", a group of humans (Telmarines) has conquered Narnia, and the essence of the plot is the struggle of good Prince Caspian against his wicked uncle, the King Miraz. The children are summoned back to Narnia to help the good Prince. C.S. Lewis is not my favorite author, but his fiction is fairly good for its simple,...
Published 10 months ago by Will Jerom


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars PRINCE CASPIAN by C. S. Lewis, January 28, 2011
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
Prince Caspian, or, Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia (1951) is a children's fantasy novel, the second in C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia. Here, Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy are drawn back to Narnia, where hundreds of years have passed, and must work to overthrow a usurper and put the rightful king on the throne.

The story itself is rather straightforward: the Pevensies are in Narnia to do a job and get out. It's all business, and the spirit of adventure the reader finds in the best books of the series is mostly absent here; it doesn't help that the story follows the same basic structure as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, only without most of that book's epic feel and emotional power. And yet the world of magical characters and Lewis's own wit and sprinkling of profound Christian principles carry the story and make it an enjoyable read in spite of its flaws.

A prominent theme in Prince Caspian is the virtue of faith and belief; some of the children experience degrees of doubt in Aslan, and many of the Narnians have lost faith in him altogether. Other themes include chivalry and, as is always the case with Aslan, grace.

Prince Caspian suffers from some storytelling issues. The novel starts with the Pevensie children, follows them briefly, and then jumps to Prince Caspian's backstory, which takes up nearly half the novel. When the story returns to the Pevensies, they spend most of their time doing little more trudging through the woods. Prince Caspian almost certainly would have worked better if Lewis had written the whole thing from the point of view of Caspian himself (along the lines of what he did with Tirian in The Last Battle), although this would only further highlight the fact that the Pevensies have very little to do throughout most of the novel (and half of what they do is squabble).

On the whole, Prince Caspian is probably the weakest book in the Chronicles of Narnia, but even so, it's still worthwhile.
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4.0 out of 5 stars they start to feel rather like they've been there before, August 3, 2014
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie are all waiting for the train to return to school when something unexpected happens. One minute they are on the platform, the next they are in Narnia. Though they've only been away from Narnia a year in our world, it appears much more time has passed in Narnia. The children aren't quite sure where they've been whisked away to. They finally come upon a place to shelter in a ruined building and, though it doesn't look familiar at first, they start to feel rather like they've been there before. The placement of the well and the layout of the rooms finally gets them to thinking this must be Cair Paravel, their old home when they were kings and queens of Narnia. Though, for this much ruin to have taken place, it has to have been hundreds of years since they were last here.

Prince Caspian is told by his nurse stories of an old Narnia where there are talking beasts and Aslan is the high king. Miraz, Caspian's uncle, hears of this and quickly gets rid of the nurse and hires a tutor for Caspian. Miraz does not want anyone discussing the old Narnia; he likes it much better the way it is now with him as the ruler of Narnia. The new tutor teaches Caspian and helps him escape when it is learned that Caspian is to be killed so he will not take his rightful place as King of Narnia. Caspian flees his home and soon comes upon an unlikely group of animals; they are talking beasts. Trufflehunter (a badger) and Trumpkin (a red dwarf) turn out to be Caspian's strongest allies and assist him on his journey to evade Miraz's army. With the assistance of the talking beasts and the Pevensie's, Caspian must fight to take his rightful place in Narnia.

This installment of the Narnia series brought back more of the wonder that I was longing for and missed in The Horse and His Boy. I liked meeting the new characters in this book. Caspian is someone you can root for and I liked Reepicheep, the brave mouse.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fine for Children, Light for Adults, November 13, 2013
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This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
In the sequel to "The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe", a group of humans (Telmarines) has conquered Narnia, and the essence of the plot is the struggle of good Prince Caspian against his wicked uncle, the King Miraz. The children are summoned back to Narnia to help the good Prince. C.S. Lewis is not my favorite author, but his fiction is fairly good for its simple, light style. Very readable for kids, still light entertainment for adults, there are a few points of subtle commentary on human nature that make it still engaging reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The first fantasy series for children, July 19, 2013
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This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
Somehow a grandchild must have borrowed this book and failed to return it. It had to be replaced so the set will be complete when it's time for the great grands to begin the series. I first used the series when I was a fifth grade teacher of religious education. Oh, the wonderful discussions we had. Then the books were read by my children and grandchildren.
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5.0 out of 5 stars best series ever, March 2, 2013
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
this whole series is the best ever, I have been reading it since my cousin handed me the first book when I was 12 and bored out of my mind. I mean that literally, I read it at least once every year. I was really disappointed that Hollywood felt the need to change the stories so drastically, I would not have recognized "Voyage of the Dawn Treader", if Edmond and Lucy had not been named. They changed all the movies but #3 was the worst. This series is so captivating and thrilling that no changes are really necessary. I wonder if the screen writers even bothered to read the book or just worked from the description on the back.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Train to another world!, January 30, 2012
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This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
Lucy, Edmond, Susan , and Peter had returned safely to England after their visit to their uncle's house and then to Narnai through his wardrobe. And now the war's over and they are back in school but desperately want to go back to Narnia.

As they are waiting for a train to come a hole opens in the wall and when they go through it they recognizer the place as Narnia. But then they find the city of Care Paravel in ruins with only a few pillars and some of their old things left. It had been hundreds of years in Narnia but only one year in our time since they had ruled Narnia.

Only their journy they meet Tumkin and Prince Caspian and they all work together with the help of other Narnian's to gain back Caspian's throne from his evil uncle who is destroying Narnia. In the end Aslan comes and helps them, but he tells Susan and Peter that this is their last time in Narnia because they are too old, but Edmond and Lucy will be able to come back sometimes soon.

I really liked this book. The first one, The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe is still my favorite but I like this one too.

Originally posted on 3 Book Bees Blog
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sweet Old Edition: Not Like New Movie, January 10, 2012
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
If you have seen the new movie based on this book, I am so sorry to say the book and movie wre very different. I've heard the older film is more like the book, but in my opinion the book is much much better. In fact this is one of my favorite Narnia books.

It is a suspensful thriller without the changes made to it for the bog screen. What I really liked was how Edmund developed into a stronger character by remorse and wisdom. I also liked how Lucy was given so much insight and how that effected the story.

It all builds down to the end like a funnel and the journey is fun. A nice cozy read for children and adults. Although you should note that there are some things like virant language and battle scenes within that journey...not much, but some.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The edition I had as a child...classic, September 24, 2010
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
As another reviewer pointed out, this is meant to be the second in the series. This edition is the one I had (and still have) as a child. Not quite as gripping as The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, but C.S. Lewis is a genius. Interesting fairy tale on its own, even more interesting to delve deeper and find the religious meaning and symbolism.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prince Caspian recovers his kingdom and becomes King Caspian, November 6, 2009
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This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
A year has passed for the Pevensie children since their return from Narnia after the events related in "The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe". "Prince Caspian" starts with Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy waiting on an empty, sleepy, country station platform awaiting a train to take them to school. It is then that they find themselves magically transported back to Narnia, but a Narnia 1300 years into the future. When the Pevensie children were last in Narnia they were kings and queens, now they are ancient legends and their castle Cair Paravel is abandoned and overgrown with apple trees. The children assist Prince Caspian to regain his rightful throne with the help of a number of talking animals and fantasy beings.

One of the pleasures I found in the Narnia books is the author's flair for conjuring enchanting names for his characters. The names seem to resonate the personality of the individual or the imaginary creature without being obvious or juvenile. One imaginings Lewis pronouncing these names in order to ascertain there oral appropriateness for parent who read these stories to their children. Some examples I particularly admired are Wimbleweather and Caspian. When you see "Wimbleweather" it could only be a big awkward giant and Caspian rings with authority and leadership - like a King!

`Caspian" is listed as book 2 in many editions of the Narnia stories and it stands to reason that most readers will read it after "Wardrobe". The fact is that the author wanted "Caspian" to be read 4th after "Magician's Nephew", "Wardrobe" and " Horse and His Boy". The reason for this is that by reading the books in the sequence the author wished some of the Narnia mysteries are resolved for the reader.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the published order set!, August 26, 2008
This review is from: Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia) (Paperback)
If the description and picture on this item is at all accurate, this is indeed the published order set... This is the first Narnia set my parents bought me when I was young and I've read the covers off it -- and sadly I've not been able to find a good hardcover set published in Lewis' original publishing order. All the book publishing companies seem to think chronological order is necessary. If you are looking for the original order - this is it!
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Prince Caspian: Book 2 in The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia)
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