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Prince Otto Paperback – May 15, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-8132052524 ISBN-10: 8132052528

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 174 pages
  • Publisher: Tutis Digital Publishing Pvt. Ltd. (May 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8132052528
  • ISBN-13: 978-8132052524
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,337,517 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in 1850 in Edinburgh, the son of an engineer. He briefly studied engineering, then law, and contributed to university magazines while a student. Despite life-long poor health, he was an enthusiastic traveller, writing about European travels in the late 1870s and marrying in America in 1879. He contributed to various periodicals, writing first essays and later fiction. His first novel was Treasure Island in 1883, intended for his stepson, who collaborated with Stevenson on two later novels. Some of Stevenson's subsequent novels are insubstantial popular romances, but others possess a deepening psychological intensity. He also wrote a handful of plays in collaboration with W.E. Henley. In 1888, he left England for his health, and never returned, eventually settling in Samoa after travelling in the Pacific islands. His time here was one of relatively good health and considerable writing, as well as of deepening concern for the Polynesian islanders under European exploitation, expressed in fictional and factual writing from his final years, some of which was so contrary to contemporary culture that a full text remained unavailable until well after Stevenson's death. R. L. Stevenson died of a brain haemorrhage in 1894. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was a novelist, poet, short-story writer, and essayist. In 1883, while bedridden with tuberculosis, he wrote what would become one of the best known and most beloved collections of children's poetry in the English language, A Child's Garden of Verses. Block City is taken from that collection. Stevenson is also the author of such classics as Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

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Customer Reviews

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Tom Nelson on March 13, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Winds of Wharhalen "Prince Otto" is a great departure from better known Robert Louis Stevenson works. For example, Treasure Island and Kidnapped are adventure stories aimed a young male readers longing for travel and excitement. The Master of Ballentrae and The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde explore the dark, sinister side of human nature. In none of these famous works does romance play an important part. "Prince Otto", however, is ultimately a love story, although it may not seem apparent early in the book. The Prince and his wife, Princess Serafina, in their roles as heads of state and royalty, have grown apart from each other. As the story progresses, they undergo momentous transformations as they begin to lose these superficial veneers that mask their humanity. The unlikely catalyst for this transformation is a web of court intrigue that includes power struggles, treachery, and deceit. The story is vividly and beautifully told by the writer, whom I believe is the most readable of 19th century authors.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Chip Hunter VINE VOICE on May 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a difficult book to classify. It is certainly not an adventure story (like most other RLS novels) or a mystery. While almost humorous, it is not written as a comedy, and it can only be loosely categorized as a romance. Telling a seemingly serious story, of the downfall of a German prince and the rise of democracy, the tone of the story belies that seriousness and lends itself more to a comedy. The primary characters are foppish and overly dramatic, giving this story the aspect of a satire on the courts of old Europe. Nothing too blatant, but you can't help but get the feel of the author's sarcasm as he describes rough country folk, pampered courtiers, and emotional royalty.

That being said, this does tell a complete and almost fairy tale-like story. As Otto and Seraphina blunder into loosing everything, they wind up gaining even more. A tale of growth, love, and shedding the petty stuff, PRINCE OTTO has all the makings of a serious story with worthwhile lessons, desperate chances, and a happy ending. Throw in Stevenson's not-quite-satirical prose and the not-quite-respectable characters and you've got a curiously light-hearted read with a dangerously serious plot. Here's respect to Stevenson for pulling off this unexpected and uniquely entertaining novel.

Recommended for those that enjoy something different every now and then.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jesse Rouse on December 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
I am a great admirer of Robert Louis Stevenson's books, as I find in them some of the greatest adventure stories the human imagination has brought forth. Stevenson's work has a quality that is different from the adventures of most other authors: boyish imagination. When we read something by someone like Alexandre Dumas, the element of adventure is still there, but it is missing something of the "boyishness" or innocence of Stevenson's adventures. Dumas' work was informed by real life interation with people, while Stevenson's work tended to be more from imagination than from experience. His books are the things he wishes he himself could do, but could not because of his tuberculosis.

Now, I came to this book expecting to find the same adventure and imagination that I found in Treasure Island, The Master of Ballantre, Kidnapped, etc., but I was severely dissapointed. Wikipedia said of this book that it was "Stevenson's second full-length narrative, an action romance set in the imaginary Germanic state of Grünewald." This is simply not true. There is no action or adventure in this book. It is a story about Prince Otto of Grunewald, a middle-aged man with a weak characted who is an admitedly poor ruler whose wife rules behind his back by means of Herr von Gondremark, with whom she is widely held to be having an affair. The whole story is basically about the Prince attempting to be a good prince and husband, but failing, the whole time revealing the flaws in his charatcer. While this sounds like a set up for comedy, Stevenson takes a completely serious approach to it, eliminating even that possability of enjoyment.

This book is nothing short of a character study in the manner of Jane Austin.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Johnjohn on February 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
What a let down of a novel. Interesting to read a great writer floundering when writing another genre. Characters two dimensional, tale contrived, and Stevenson out of his depth when attempting satire. Basically I reckon his heart wasn,t in it and it shows.
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