A Princess Found: An American Family, an African Chiefdom... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.96
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Princess Found: An American Family, an African Chiefdom, and the Daughter Who Connected Them All Hardcover – July 7, 2009


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.83 $0.01



Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (July 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312378793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312378790
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.3 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,405,355 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

As a biracial child adopted into a nurturing white middle-class family in West Virginia, Sarah Culberson experienced warmth, stability and personal fulfillment while growing up. Like most adopted children, Culberson had questions about her biological roots, and as a biracial child dealt with the additional emotional burden of negotiating the world of racial identity. After being questioned by a teacher as to why she wore blue contact lenses, a stunned and embarrassed Culberson begins the journey to find-and embrace-her roots. Her story quickly becomes extraordinary, as she discovers her father is not just alive and living in Africa, but is part of African royalty, making her an African princess. This entertaining, informative, inspiring memoir is told through two narratives taken up in alternating chapters: one details Culberson's story of growing up, going off to college, and ultimately establishing a life for herself in the arts; the other recounts her father's incredible story of falling in love with Culberson's American mother, his struggle to keep his family alive during Sierra Leon's brutal civil war, and the remarkable reunion of father and daughter.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School—Popular with her classmates and loved by her adoptive family, African-American Sarah Culberson has never truly felt that she belonged. After graduating from high school and moving away for college, she began to seek the truth about her biological parents. She eventually hired a private investigator and learned that while her mother was a white woman, now deceased, her father is African royalty—the chief of a Mende tribe. She eventually traveled to Sierra Leone and saw firsthand both the poverty and the beauty that exist in the war-torn nation. Interspersed with Culberson's story are chapters chronicling her father's life in a village ravaged by rebels. She describes his years as a refugee in a crowded and unsanitary city and the return and rebuilding of his home and school. This eloquently written memoir covers the isolation an African-American child can feel in a predominantly white environment; the technical aspects and emotional turmoil of a search for biological parents; and the contrast between American wealth and African poverty. The author realizes the high expectations placed on her by her father's tribe, not only because she is an American, but also because she is their princess. Teens will relate to her search for a balance between her ancestry and familial obligations and her life in the United States. The narrative style keeps the memoir moving forward yet the historical and cultural information it imparts is as significant as its entertainment value.—Karen E. Brooks-Reese, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
It's well written and is a compelling story.
Kim W. Zook
The author skillfully tackles the story of Sarah Culberson's personal journey of discovery as she seeks out her biological parents.
M. L. Casey
This book is a wonderful journey of courage and discovery.
Story Circle Book Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Warren on August 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Crack open the cover of A Princess Found, and you will be swept up into the simultaneous biographies of a very normal young woman from white America, and of the African father she did not know, as he runs the gauntlet of daily survival in the Sierra Leone of the late 1990's, then the most dangerous place on earth.

Though I knew the story before I began chapter one, I could not put this book down until I finished the first half. The narrow escapes, time after time, of Joseph Konia Kposowa and his family, from attacks by the notorious rebel soldiers of Liberia's then President Charles Taylor - the same RUF child-soldier death squads for which Taylor sits imprisoned at the Hague today - had me riveted. Those who have read Ismeal Beah's "A Long Way Gone" will find the terrain familiar, and no less terrifying.

Poignant and repeatedly ironic is the parallel story of Sarah's middle class life as a mixed race, adopted girl in middle America. Candidly echoed and explored are the deep-seeded insecurities familiar to anyone close to those, or who were themselves, adopted as infants. Well described is the additional layer of mixed race geneology and sociological observations in America. Authentic, important similarities to President Obama's insights in "Dreams Of My Father" run deeper than the two books' cover designs. This story is very American.

In the interest of full disclosure, I am happy to admit my friendship with Sarah Culberson. I first met Sarah in 2007 when she agreed to be Featured Guest at the Royal African Ball, an event organized by the Consular Chamber of Commerce to fund secular school development in sub-Saharan Africa.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Zachary C. Herries on September 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I've been following Sarah and the progress her foundation is making in her home town of Bumpe, Sierra Leone now for several years. Her insightful journey shows that miracles can and do happen. She illustrates her identity issues as a bi-racial woman raised in a predominantly white town, and the inner struggles she faces coming to grips with her biological parents. After reading this book, I feel more aware of the struggles that Africa faces, and that one person can make a difference.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Story Circle Book Reviews on October 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
As a bi-racial actress, dancer, and teacher, Sara Culberson gradually comes to realize that she wants, and needs, to know her biological and cultural background. Her need isn't born of deprivation or secrecy. She loves the white family that adopted her as a baby and raised her in West Virginia. Her quest is about personal growth and the truths that make adults feel complete and comfortable in their own skin. This book is a wonderful journey of courage and discovery.

Like all adopted children, Sarah built fantasies and illusions about her biological parents and her adoption. As an adult, she began to understand this and to want to replace myths with facts. Since her adoption was a closed, her parents don't have much information to offer. However, they openly answer Sarah's questions as best they can. To learn more, a search for her birth parents is Sarah's only option. Thought gradually evolves into action after a fellow church member tells Sarah that she knew her birth mother.

The warm welcome she received from her birth mother's family, along with the love and support of her adoptive family, left Sarah hungry to know more and ready to take the risks, although the search wasn't always smooth. At one point, she met with the rejection she feared most and it caused her to back off from her search, but eventually, she faced her fear. She also received encouragement from unexpected places. One such person, a hairdresser from Nigeria, knew African culture and customs and assured Sarah that she'd be welcomed.

As I read about her birth father, Joe Kposowa--his youth, his immense responsibilities, and the gigantic cultural differences--there's no doubt that he made the right choice when he signed the papers to relinquish his right to be Sarah's father.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kim W. Zook on July 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I love this book! It's well written and is a compelling story. Sarah tells of her life as a bi-racial girl growing up with a white family in a white town in West Virginia, and then tells the story of her biological father's struggles with the civil war in Sierra Leone at the same time. I couldn't put the book down, always wanted to find out what happened next!

Sarah is a friend of mine - I met her in early '07 and found her to be an amazing young woman, with an interesting and compelling story. You will love her story, her enthusiasm, and her commitment to the Mende people of Sierra Leone, where she is considered a Princess.

Great job Princess Sarah!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Lee W. on August 30, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this a most heart warming account of this extraordinary woman. I also felt a chill come over me when I realized that her mother was a classmate of mine in high school. We graduated in 1959 from a small high school in West Virginia. I played in our school band the same year her mother was the "Buckwheat Festival" princess. What a small world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search