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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raise a smart knightess!
Being the mom of a little diva myself - luckily a knight in disguise - I always worry about the `princess' effect on girls of any age. I necessarily do not consider the princess syndrome evil, but like the author, do feel a major need to balance the princess effect with other down-to-earth measures. Finding this point of view in the introduction, I was all too ready to...
Published on December 20, 2011 by LadyInRead

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A terrific resource for parents of little girls.
Princesses.
You know who I mean. Those young women who haven't realized that we aren't playing dress-up anyone. The ones who must look perfect - pearls and plastered makeup - before going out for the mail. The girls who are waiting for someone to ride up on a horse and rescue them. The girls who refuse to allow others to see their intelligence because it's not...
Published on March 28, 2012 by Gina Hott


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raise a smart knightess!, December 20, 2011
By 
LadyInRead (San Jose, CA, US) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
Being the mom of a little diva myself - luckily a knight in disguise - I always worry about the `princess' effect on girls of any age. I necessarily do not consider the princess syndrome evil, but like the author, do feel a major need to balance the princess effect with other down-to-earth measures. Finding this point of view in the introduction, I was all too ready to dive into the book to figure out how to help myself help my little ones grow into strong, independent, self-reliant, beautiful-inside-and-out individuals! I am glad to say this book is perfect for this.
I love the ideas she imparts that we can use at any age - some of them are here:
* using `wish lists' (add items to a wish-list and set a waiting period for them, revisit - you might find you do not want/need it anymore, else, figure out what needs to be done to get it)
* reinforces the idea of parents being role-models with lots of surprising places where we fail (for example, how many times do you ask them to respond to you immediately or soon, no matter what they are doing, after trying to teach them perseverance? I am guilty)
Each chapter is organized clearly:
* Main idea of chapter - the `Princess' Symptom problem and the `Heroine' Value to instill.
* A brief overview of the chapter
* The `Princess' Symptom - the whys, hows and whats
* Steps and ideas to overcome/work on avoiding the Princess Symptom
* The `Heroine' Value - the whys, hows and whats
* Steps and ideas to instill these characters that make up the value
* Age-Appropriate solutions for the `Princess' Symptom (Ages 2-3, 4-5, 6-8) - though this part only addresses these age-groups, these can be applied across ages.
There are also two helpful and informative appendixes which give a list of good books and play ideas to instill healthy values while resolving the issues of the `Princess' symptom.
All in all, a wonderful book.
Disclaimer: I received this book from NetGalley and did not receive any other compensation other than the digital review copy. This is my honest review of the book.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Book!, December 14, 2011
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
As a father of two girls I am always looking for advice on how best to help my girls live well adjusted lives and I was amazed to find that this book has so much within it to help all of us who are Dads of Divas. With the world being what it is these days I am always concerned about my daughters' self esteem as well as what they see in the media as I know that for some girls the portrayal of women does not always provide for self-empowerment. This book addresses this and so many more issues in a way all can understand. I also have to say that I loved the fact that the writer knew her stuff. As someone who has been studying this for some time she provides down-to-earth examples and advice for all without coming across as preaching or as talking down to her audience. This was a great book that I would highly recommend to all!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Important Read for Parents of Girls, December 28, 2011
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
Wonderful book for all care givers of girls. Mandatory read for all.

The 411: As the mom of a 6 year old spitfire and a Daisy leader to 10 girls I love reading books about creating balance and confidence in young girls. I worry about the preteens in my life who seem to be going through so much already. As a young girl, (and sometimes still do) confidence was something I completely lacked. There was no one protecting, monitoring or filtering out what I saw or heard. I see it now with so many of my female friends, family and more who ask young kids if they have a boyfriend, or girlfriend in school and the kids are only 4 - 12 years old. So many think it is cute when young children have a crush or wear "sexy" clothes. Personally I find it repulsive. When Goddess was a toddler and anyone said she was pretty, I would follow with she is smart too! Little girls grow up hearing things like "pretty, sexy, thin, etc" and these words sit with them and if they are not these things or if they are, they feel THIS is what matters. Dr. Hartstein's method doesn't have to be followed to a T but it is a great place to start.

Dr. Hartstein reminds us that raising a smart, strong, empowered girl starts with what she is learning at home. Check yourself and make sure you are sending the most positive message. Evaluate your own morals. Girls grow up way to fast.

I love the age appropriate break down in each section too. From ages 2-3, 4-5, 6-8 you can help your daughters create a strong sense of self which will enable them to make the right decisions that will help them the rest of their lives.

My hope for Goddess is that she keeps your spirit. She is funny and doesn't conform. She knows what it means to have a good heart, to help people, and she is confident in her mastered abilities. However, as a people pleaser she is often hurt by words like, "I don't like you," "You are not my friend," "You are stupid", the annoying things other kids say when they don't have others telling them how to be a nice person. I simply ask her, "Are you stupid?" or "do they talk to you?" When she says No or yes respectively I remind her that words only hurt us if we let them. If you know you are NOT those things or Don't do those things, ignore them.

Read this book cover to cover and I believe it to be a great resource for girls of all ages. Monitoring yourself is key to raising a well balanced girl. When I think about all my daughter may have to go through in life and love. The heartbreaks, confusion and hurt of boyfriends, girlfriends, family and more I pray I can teach her everything I have learned in Princess Recovery and lessen all the above.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great advice for raising confident-not entitled-girls, January 20, 2012
By 
kwiemers (San Jose, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
The author makes a compelling argument on the harm of the princess culture on girls. She provides advice and tips for different ages. Some of the advice seems rather simple, but simple often works best. The advice also applies to mothers and adult women. I saw where some of my attitudes have been shaped by a princess culture that was not as strong as it is today. The book could use better organization. Descriptions of princess behavior and attitudes are immediately followed by advice and tips for countering it, so it is easy to miss all of the author's suggestions.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, June 17, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Enjoyed reading, it was interesting there are some things that when I have daughters one day I can go back and reread:)
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A terrific resource for parents of little girls., March 28, 2012
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
Princesses.
You know who I mean. Those young women who haven't realized that we aren't playing dress-up anyone. The ones who must look perfect - pearls and plastered makeup - before going out for the mail. The girls who are waiting for someone to ride up on a horse and rescue them. The girls who refuse to allow others to see their intelligence because it's not ladylike.

Don't let your daughter fall into this trap! Grab this book and learn how to help her - and hopefully others - avoid the Princess Syndrome and instead become a heroine.

Hott Review
We all know how hard it is to stop the `Princess Syndrome' once it's started but we aren't positive how to help our daughters - and other girls in our lives - overcome this rampant philosophy.

While I didn't agree with everything the good doctor wrote, I really feel that this book will be a terrific resource as we propel our daughter through her formative years.
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0 of 64 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I need help about this, March 3, 2012
This review is from: Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters (Hardcover)
I put this as one star to get the attention of those who have purchased this. Would this book be good for a 15 yr old? I have a beautiful daughter who just doesn't see it.
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Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide to Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters
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