Your Garage botysf16 Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it PME Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Patriotic Picks Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer WienerDog WienerDog WienerDog  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis Segway miniPro STEM


Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on February 18, 2013
Keep this book with you at all times. It is a reference work for honest and honorable living. Epicurus reminds us that we are all the same and we have a duty to ourselves and our communities to live the honorable and virtuous life.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 3, 2013
I am still working through this, but here is a glimpse of what intelligent people thought before organised religion, particularly monotheism, got power hungry.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 22, 2013
Amazingly, this book of roughly 50 sentences (about 1 per page) is riddled with errors. The translations are also confusing or corrupted in several places. You would be much better off to just Google "Epicurus quotes" than to pay any money for this hack effort at compiling some of them. Properly translated, the sayings of Epicurus are beautiful and thought-provoking. This is just sloppy, sloppy work. Shame on whoever published this.

For those interested, here are examples of the above criticisms (the typos and indecipherable phrasings are not mine, but the author's, as actually found in the book):

"If all pleasure had been capable of accumulation,--if this had gone on not only be recurrences of time, but all over the frame or, at any rate, over the principled parts of human nature, there would never have been any difference between one pleasure and another, as in fact there is." - p. 9 (indecipherable translation, typo)

"The just person enjoys. the greatest peace of mind, while the unjust is full of the utmost disquietude." - p. 17 (period in the middle of the sentence)

"We must take into account as the end all that really exists and all clear evidence of sense to which we refer our opinion; for otherwise everything will be full of uncertainty and confusion." - p. 22 (sloppy translation)

"There never was an absolute justice, but only an agreement made in reciprocal association in whatever localities now and again from time to time, providing against the infliction or suffering of harm." - p. 33 (now and again from time to time??)
11 comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 17, 2012
This is a must for everyone. Pure enlightment and old wise which means actual thruth and freedom of spirit. The world could be different.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.